Leadville Life

Trick or Treat Street is Ready With Sweets!

Leadville’s Trick or Treat Street will be held on the first two-hundred blocks of W. 7th Street tomorrow Friday, Oct. 31 from 5 – 9 p.m. This annual event allows children to go door to door Trick or Treating in a safe, supervised environment.

Leadville Trick-or-Treaters wait patiently at a house on W. 7th Street for their turn to get some goodies, which should not be in short supply this year, thanks to generous donations from the community.

Leadville Trick-or-Treaters wait patiently at a house on W. 7th Street for their turn to get some goodies, which should not be in short supply this year, thanks to generous donations from the community.

This year, Amanda Stinnett took over organizational responsibilities, with help from Bernadette Bifano. The team has received some generous cash and candy donations this year from ALCO, Wild Bill’s, The Mule Kick, City On A Hill Coffee, The King Family, Veterans of Foreign War (VFW), Order of the Eastern Star (OES) Colorado Chapter #2, Cloud City Medical, Lady Sage Vacation Rental, Liz Stuart/8th Street Bookkeeping, Leadville Liquors, Helping Hands, The Lafferty Family, Leadville Today, The St. Vincent Hospital Foundation, Leadville Lions Club, The Miller Family, Silver City Conoco, Neenan Construction, and The Overland Property Group (owners of the Tabor Grand Hotel Apartments).

A caped-crusader makes the rounds at Leadville's Annual Trick or Treat Street.

A caped-crusader makes the rounds at Leadville’s Trick or Treat Street.

“So many people gave anonymously or contributed candy to the event,” said Stinnett, who has collected more than $1,500 for the annual event. Hopefully that means that there will be plenty of candy supplies for all of the generous residents on the first two-hundred block of West 7th Street, who lavishly decorate their homes and give out goodies to the Trick-or-Treaters at this FREE family-fun event.

Neenan Construction and Overland are also taking extra safety pre-cautions to make sure that the kiddos are safe in the area, which has been under construction as the Tabor Grand Hotel under goes a $7 million dollar renovation. However, parents are still encouraged to use extra caution around any scaffold/construction area. Neenan also told Leadville Today that they have planned a special Halloween fence decoration for the west side of their caged area. Can’t wait to see what they come up with!

See you there . . . . if you dare!

See you there . . . . if you dare!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Get Your Spook on at the Stapleton Haunted House

The Stapleton Manor Haunted House (118 W. 7th St.) will be open Halloween Night, October 31 and then again on Saturday, Nov. 1, from 6 – 9 p.m. Come and get your spook on in a fun, safe environment located in an historic 1880s carriage house.

The Stapleton Haunted Mansion on W. 7th Street in Leadville.

The Stapleton Haunted Mansion on W. 7th Street in Leadville.

Children 13 years and younger must be accompanied by an adult. The cost is $5 per person. The event is an annual fundraiser for Full Circle of Lake County, a non-profit youth services program. Countless volunteer hours and the generosity of the Stapleton Family, who host the haunt at their home, allow this event to take place – Thank You!

Makali Beck, Youth Activities Assistant at Full Circle invites you to the Stapleton Manor Haunted House. Photo: Full Circle Facebook Page.

Makali Beck, Youth Activities Assistant at Full Circle invites you to the Stapleton Manor Haunted House. Photo: Full Circle Facebook Page.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Monster Mash Nightlife Fun at The Scarlet

For the adult set the fun can be had at The Scarlet’s Annual Halloween Bash and Monster Mash. On Halloween Night get your bones rattling to the tunes of Hayes, Epp and Bones. TheScarlet Monster MashThey will also hold their famous costume contest with cash, as well as bar tab, prizes.

The party continues Saturday night with the some live music from String Board Theory (SBT). There is no cover charge for either show, must be 21+, and the music starts at 10 p.m. The Scarlet is located in downtown Leadville at the corner of 4th and historic Harrison Avenue.

Advocates, Residents to “Take Back the Trail” Nov. 5

Submitted by The Advocates of Lake County

The Advocates of Lake County have heard from several residents who are concerned about their safety in the aftermath of the sexual assault that took place near the intersection of 12th Street and Harrison Avenue, adjacent to the Mineral Belt Trail, on Saturday. Oct. 11. at 11:30 p.m.

The Nov. 5 "Take Back The Trail" walk hosted by The Advocates of Lake County will walk from the LCIS parking lot, to 12th Street and Harrison Avenue at the Lake County Public Library. The group will return on the same route, after a presentation in the library, in a silent candlelight procession. Everyone is welcome.

The Nov. 5 “Take Back The Trail” walk hosted by The Advocates of Lake County will walk the Mineral Belt Trail from the LCIS parking lot, to 12th St. and Harrison Ave. at the Lake County Public Library. The group will return on the same route, after a presentation at the library, in a silent candlelight procession. Everyone welcome.

In an effort to ease some of the fears that residents have expressed, the Advocates will ‘Take Back the Trail’ to show the perpetrators of this crime that we do not tolerate sexual assault in our community. Many residents have expressed a need to renew a sense of safety when walking or running the Mineral Belt Trail alone. By taking back the trail, we can show support to victims of sexual assault and break the silence surrounding violence and abuse.

The sad truth is there should be one more sign added to the group on the Lake County Courthouse lawn, to represent the most recent victim of domestic violence. The display went up on October 1 in honor of domestic violence month. The pink signs represent the number of domestic violence victims in Lake County from Jan-Sept of this year. Photo: Leadville Today.

The sad truth is there should be one more sign added to the group on the Lake County Courthouse lawn, to represent the most recent victim of domestic violence. The display went up on October 1 in honor of domestic violence month. The pink signs represent the number of domestic violence victims in Lake County (from Jan-Sept of this year). Photo: Leadville Today.

If you would like to join the Advocates to “Take Back the Trail” please meet at the Lake County Intermediate School (LCIS) parking lot on Wednesday, Nov. 5 at 6:30 p.m. The group will walk the Mineral Belt Trail from the LCIS parking lot to the Lake County Public Library where there will be refreshments donated by Cookies With Altitude and conversation in the community room upstairs at the library. At 8 p.m. the group will walk back to the LCIS parking lot in silence with candles to represent the silence that surrounds sexual assault victims.

If you love the Mineral Belt Trail and want to show your support to keep Leadville safe, please join the Advocates on November 5 to ‘Take Back the Trail’. Please bundle up and bring flash lights. For more information about this event or The Advocates, contact 719-486-3530.

Advocates_Logo

Established in 1983, the Advocates of Lake County’s mission is to assist any victim of crime, violence, or other traumatic event, primarily victims of domestic violence and sexual assault. The Advocates work for positive social change, seeking to promote a safe and healthy community. Contact 719-486-3530. Obit_Spacer_Thin

Friends and Neighbors of the Victim Rally Support

Friends and neighbors have also rallied together to help the victim of this recent violent crime. Victim Support copy
So if you can, please consider donating directly to this victim by contacting Jewlee Washburn at 970-389-2814. Gift cards, special presents and cards, or cash donations are being collected.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Police Chief Leake to Release Update on Case Today

Amid growing community concerns, and a lack of details regarding the Oct. 11, 2014 sexual assault case in Leadville, Police Chief Mike Leake informed Leadville Today by phone yesterday that an update will be released today.

Police Chief Mike Leake

Leadville Police Chief Mike Leake

“I plan to provide an update regarding the case by the end of tomorrow (Oct. 28),” stated Chief Leake.

Since the crime occurred within the city limits, the Leadville Police Department (LPD) will act as lead investigator for the case. Chief Leake added that the investigation is ongoing and that his department would be conducting more interviews regarding the case today.

Leadville Today will immediately post those updates to this report as they become available. However, it’s important to note where things go from here, legally.Police_Press_Release

Since the LPD is the lead investigator on this case, they have the burden of gathering evidence, conducting initial interviews, including making an arrest, if their investigation leads to that course of action, and essentially helping to build the case against any suspects/perpetrators.

DA Bruce Brown will ultimately decide what charges - if any - will be filed in the sexual assault case.

DA Bruce Brown will ultimately decide what charges – if any – will be filed in the sexual assault case.

Once the LPD concludes their investigation, they turn their findings over to the District Attorney Bruce Brown. From there, DA Brown reviews their findings,to determine what charges, if any, are to be filed.

District Attorney Brown confirmed in a phone interview with Leadville Today that his office is in regular communication with the Leadville Police Department and Chief Leake regarding the case.

All parties seemed to concur that investigations take time. Stay tuned for any official updates from law enforcement.

 

Animal Planet to Film in Leadville Next Month

Calling all pet owners! This is your chance to have your ailing critter seen at a FREE veterinary clinic in Leadville AND become an Animal Planet TV sensation!

Your up your ailing ass and sign up for the FREE Vet Clinic with Animal Planet in Leadville Nov. 5.

Round up your ailing ass & sign up for the FREE Clinic with Animal Planet on Nov. 5.

Leadville Today received a call from Emmy Award-Winning Producer Madeleine Pollak regarding an upcoming Animal Planet Primetime TV series. So, on Wednesday, Nov. 5 there will be a mobile veterinary clinic in Leadville, offering FREE animal check-ups. Animal services/surgeries will also be offered at a reduced rate.

Veterinarian, Dr. Jeff Young, one of Colorado’s premier Vets will be traveling to Leadville to offer the animal clinic and all visits will be filmed for the Animal Planet Primetime TV series.

Animal Planet“We are hoping to find some alpacas, goats, cows, donkeys, reptiles, birds, that have some kind of ailment,” explained Pollak. However, they will accept all kinds of animal and be scheduling appointments based on an animal’s needs.

So, if you’re interested in signing up, here’s what you need to do. Email Madeleine Pollak at mpollak1@aol.com with the following information:

  • What kind of animal
  • What kind of ailment/illness/issue they are having – be as specific as you can
  • Age of your animal
  • Your email and phone number
  • Please include in the subject line what type of animal you have.

For more information about Pollak Productions, Inc. visit their website: www.pollakproductions.tv.

 

Lake County Issues Two Same-Sex Marriage Licenses

The first same sex marriage license was issued in Lake County on October 10, 2014 at the Lake County Courthouse.

Chuck Williams (Left) and Lee Trujillo (right) were issued the first same sex marriage license in Lake County on October 10, 2014. Photo: Leadville Today

Chuck Williams (Left) and Lee Trujillo (right) were issued the first same sex marriage license in Lake County on October 10, 2014. Photo: Leadville Today

“We did it,” wrote Leadville resident Lee Trujillo on his Facebook Page. “I don’t like to get giddy about things, but today is a very special day for us. We applied for our Marriage License. Actual Marriage License after 30 years together. We never expected this right to be ours, but now it is in Colorado.”

Public Record shows Trujillo and his partner Chuck Williams were issued the marriage license by Lake County Chief Deputy Clerk Kathleen Owens on October 10, 2014. The couple plan to have an official ceremony and celebration sometime soon.

For many, securing a marriage license is little more than a clerical duty. However for same sex couples applying for a license has been anything but, as the controversy has played out on the national stage. But earlier this month when the U.S. Supreme Court declined to hear all appeals on same-sex marriage, it effectively made the 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals’ ruling final, legalizing same-sex marriage in Colorado and five other states.

While the photo may be a bit fuzzy, the union is not. Lee Trujillo (left) and Chuck Williams (right) show off their marriage license, the first one in Lake County issued to a same sex couple. Photo: Padaric Smith.

While the photo may be a bit fuzzy, the union is not. Lee Trujillo (left) and Chuck Williams (right) show off their marriage license, the first one in Lake County issued to a same sex couple. Photo: Padaric Smith.

That decision led Colorado Attorney General John Suthers to say that same-sex marriage will be legal in Colorado and all 64 county clerks must issue licenses to gay couples.

Since then, according to Lake County Clerk Owens, there has been one other same sex marriage license issued, to two women. However, she noted, all of the state licenses for marriage have now been updated to read Party One and Party Two, in place of the traditional Mr./Man and Miss/Woman lines.

Best wishes to all!

 

 

Leadville Dog Park Efforts Move Forward

Local efforts to bring an official dog park to Leadville continue to move forward. The Leadville Dog Park Committee’s next meeting will be held at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 22 in the Lake County Commissioners’ Meeting Room in the Lake County Courthouse. All are welcome to attend.

The Elm Street Park in Leadville is one of the locations being considered for the new Leadville Dog Park. Graphic: Leadville Today

The Elm Street Park in Leadville is one of the locations being considered for the new Leadville Dog Park. Graphic: Leadville Today

Local efforts are being coordinated by Steve Whittington and Michelle White who advocate that a dog park would provide a place for dogs to run free for needed exercise. It would be a place where dogs and their people could mingle and socialize in friendly ways on neutral ground.

Leadville Dog Park efforts continue with the next meeting Oct. 22.

Leadville Dog Park efforts continue with the next meeting Oct. 22 at the county courthouse.

The meetings discussion topics will include updates from the committee’s meetings with the Partnership for Lake County Recreation and the Lake County Recreation Board, and discussing model dog parks and features to be considered for a local park. Local business owner, Sherry Randall offered to organize a fundraiser, and would appreciate receiving ideas for when, where, how, etc. Sherry may be reached at srandall119@yahoo.com.

The group has also established a Leadville Dog Park Facebook Page to keep people updated on their efforts.

 

 

Giving Shelter From the Storm on the MBT

By Kathy Bedell, © Leadville Today

If you’ve ever been out enjoying Leadville’s Mineral Belt Trail (MBT) and got caught in some unexpected bad weather – like an afternoon rain storm – you were probably grateful that there was a shelter nearby. Early this week, the MBT installed the fourth, and final, shelter in the southwest quadrant of the trail, between mile marker 10 and 11.

The fourth and final weather haven on the Mineral Belt Trail: Chad's Shelter. Photo: Leadville Today.

The fourth and final weather haven on the Mineral Belt Trail – Chad’s Shelter – was installed earlier this week along the popular recreation trail. Photo: Leadville Today.

This last structure – Chad’s Shelter – has been named in honor of Chad Smith, son of Dick and Charlene Smith. He would have carried on the fifth generation of the Smith Lumber business, which started in Leadville in 1900. Sadly, Chad Smith passed away in 2013; Smith Lumber closed its doors a little more than a year later, in July 2014 (link to story).

In fact, all four of the MBT buildings’ materials and labor were donated by Smith Lumber, with John Herron from Above Edge Roofing topping off the structures. Their interesting design stems from the ultimate in recycling. Each haven is made from various sized stulls, stacked on top of each other, and pulled together at the corner with a lap joint.

Handmade craftsmanship made from stulls and hard work!

Handmade craftsmanship made from stulls!

So what are stulls? Stulls are used in sacking lumber for transportation. Over the years, Smith Lumber would set the stulls aside after unloading lumber deliveries, for the express purpose of being made into a MBT shelter.

The first three shelters have been named after mining shafts in the area of where they are situated. The first shelters include the Swamp Angel Shelter, located at the Leadville overlook. The second is called Lime Lode Shelter, located as you head up California Gulch on the north side. The third shelter is the one located in Evans Gulch, named the Cummins and Finn Shelter, after the smelter in that area of the historic mining district.

So where is Chad’s Shelter? Specifically it’s between mile markers 10 and 11, in the southwest quadrant of the 11.6 mile non-motorized loop around Leadville. More informally it’s in the area where the boys scout picnic area and scopes are located. Or, if you’re familiar with the plaques along the way, Chad’s shelter sits right in front of the wildlife habitat plaque that has the picture of the bear on it.

So as the seasons turn and the chance of needed some shelter comes about with the colder weather, now you know there’s one more stull-built structure out on the trail more you. Enjoy and be sure to check out the new one when you pass by.

 

It’s Hunting Season in the Colorado High Country!

Leadville hunter Ashley McNicolas poses with the doe she harvested during September’s archery season. Photo: Ashley McNicholas.

Leadville hunter Ashley McNicolas poses with the doe she harvested during September’s archery season. Photo: Ashley McNicholas.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Public Shooting Range: Locked and Loaded for 2015

Another recreational opportunity in Lake County has just secured funding, and will move forward with construction early next year.

Lake County has been approved for $51,500 in grant funding for a 15 acre, free public shooting range located 1 mile east of the Lake County OHV Park on the power-line road. Jim Guthrie, Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPW) Shooting Range Development Grant Program Coordinator, has approved a $40,000 grant and $11,500 is from the Friends of the NRA.Shooting Range

The shooting range will provide locals and visitors a designated safe and contained area for firearm use. A 50 yard pistol range, 100 and 200 yard rifle ranges with concrete benches and a vault restroom are included. After completion, grants for a second phase will be applied for adding more benches with shelters, an improved road to the range and adding a shotgun area.

The planning for the project began early last year after the Lake County Recreation Advisory Board included a Public Shooting Range into its 2013 Recreation Master Plan. A volunteer Lake County Public Range Committee was formed under the direction of the Lake County Commissioners and the Recreation Advisory Board. Public meetings then followed with the Lake County Commissioners allocating the property to be used.

The group has begun clearing some of the land for the Lake County Public Shooting Range.

The group has begun clearing some of the land for the Lake County Public Shooting Range.

The group has begun clearing some of the land. Free wood cutting permits are available to the public from Mabel Bogeart , at the Road and Bridge office (486- 0259) for tree harvesting at the area.

Support for the project included the Lake County Commissioners, Lake County Recreation Director Amber Magee, Lake County Sheriff Rod Fenske, State Representative Millie Hamner and State Senator Gail Schwartz. CPW Area Wildlife Manager Jim Aragon and CPW Wildlife Officer Tom Martin also supported the project.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Hunters Urged Caution with Small Game

The following information was submitted by Jackie Littlepage BS, CP-FS, Director of Environmental Health/Health Inspector with the Lake County Public Health Agency.

October is the beginning of small game hunting season in Colorado. As the number of human tularemia cases in our state continues to rise, the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment reminds small game hunters to “hunt healthy” this year.

“We haven’t seen this many tularemia cases in Colorado since the 1980s,” said State Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Jennifer House. “Historically, we see cases of tularemia in hunters, and the disease is so widespread this year, we want to make sure our hunters understand the risks.”Small_Game_Hunting

“In the last 10 years Colorado has averaged three human cases of tularemia a year,” Dr. House said. “So far in 2014 we have had 11, and additional suspected cases are under investigation.”

Local health departments have received numerous reports of rabbit and rodent die-offs across the state this year. Animals from 12 counties tested positive for tularemia, a bacterial disease that can affect small game animals. It commonly causes illness and death in rabbits and rodents such as squirrels. People can get tularemia if they handle infected animals or are bitten by ticks or deer flies.

People also can be exposed to tularemia by touching contaminated soil, drinking contaminated water or inhaling bacteria. Hunters are most at risk when skinning game and preparing and consuming the meat.

Hunters should:

  • Harvest only small game that looks and acts healthy. Beware of lazy rabbits!
  • Avoid hunting in areas where dead small game has been found.
  • Wear gloves when handling small game animals, and wash your hands after removing your gloves.
  • Cook all game meat thoroughly to 160-170 F.
  • Notify your public health department or local wildlife office if you notice sick or dead rabbits or rodents.

Symptoms of tularemia include abrupt onset of fever, chills, headache, muscle aches, joint pain, vomiting, dry cough and difficulty breathing. Other symptoms are skin ulcers, swollen and painful lymph glands, inflamed eyes, sore throat, mouth sores, diarrhea or pneumonia. Tularemia often is overlooked as a diagnosis because it is rare, and the symptoms are similar to other diseases. Nine of the 11 people infected with tularemia this year were hospitalized for treatment.

Anyone who becomes ill after exposure to a sick or dead animal, or after spending time in areas where sick or dead wild animals have been seen, should talk to a health care provider about the possibility of tularemia. Tularemia is treatable with antibiotics.Small_Game2_Hunting

 

 

Obelisks in Lake County, A Monument to History

Have you seen them? There are two located in Lake County, and they are part of a sizable art project called ‘Delimitations,’ whose mission is to trace the original, 2,300-mile border between the U.S. and Mexico. Their proper name is obelisks, but they look more like mini Washington Monuments made from galvanized steel.

The number 21 obelisk seems to mimic Colorado's tallest, Mt. Elbert in its location. Can you tell its location? Photo: Leadville Today

The number 21 obelisk seems to mimic Colorado’s tallest, Mt. Elbert in its location. Can you tell its location? Photo: Leadville Today

Delimitations is a collaborative project by artists Marcos Ramírez and David Taylor. During the month of July they traveled from the Pacific Coast to the Gulf of Mexico, marking the 1821 border between Mexico and the United States. That boundary was never surveyed and its brief, 27-year history exists mainly in the form of treaty documents and antique maps.

The group’s intent is to make it visible for the first time, by placing 47 obelisks, marking the boundary line from the Adams Onis Treaty set in 1819, adopted by the US, when Mexico won independence from Spain in 1821.

That historic border runs through the Arkansas River Valley in Lake County, Colo. The artists’ journey began in late June, coming through Lake County to place markers 20 and 21, sometime in late July, according to the artists’ blog.

The 1821 Mexican/U.S.border outlined by the obelisk monuments, two of which are in Lake County. Map: Delimitations Blog.

The 1821 Mexican/U.S.border outlined by the obelisk monuments, two of which are in Lake County. Map: Delimitations Blog.

 

Since then, the obelisks have been discovered by locals and created a bit of a buzz. The first Lake County obelisk discovery was made down by the Hayden Reservoir area. In the pull-off spot for a popular fishing area, monument #21 just appeared one day. No explanation, but several clues, including a number (21), a QR code (those square bar codes you see on everything these days), and the word “Delimitation.”

So the hunt for the story began. A quick scan of the QR code printed on the side of the monument, brings those who happen to have smart phones, to the group’s blog, a fascinating account of their journey, and certainly worth the read.

It’s in that report – some of it is in Spanish, some in English – that readers will discover there is another obelisk in Lake County – number 20. Have you seen it? Can you tell where it is?

Delimitations monument number 20 has been spotted in the northern part of the county. Can you tell where? Photo: Delimitations Blog.

Delimitations monument number 20 has been spotted in the northern part of the county. Can you tell where? Photo: Delimitations Blog.

Since it was not possible for them to transport fully fabricated obelisks, they built them along the way. These monuments are made out of 20-gauge, galvanized steel, neatly stacked in pieces, ready to be assembled along the way.

So now that you know the where, the what and the how, you’ll have to check out the official blog for the why? There are lots of great photos and video, including descriptions of their journey and route.

Once you understand that, then you’ll understand why there are two Delimitations obelisks in Lake County! Then go try to find them, take your picture with one or both, and send those along to info@leadvilletoday.com or post to the LeadvilleToday Facebook Page.

Artist Marcos Ramírez assembles one of the Delimitations monuments during their journey this past summer. Photo: Delimitations Blog

Artist Marcos Ramírez assembles one of the Delimitations monuments during their journey this past summer. Photo: Delimitations Blog

Lake County Road Re-Opened After Sinkhole Repair

Local officials were notified of a 2 foot sinkhole on Lake County Road 2 by a passing cyclist at about 4:30 yesterday afternoon, Sept. 26.

Lake County Road and Bridge Crews secure the area around a sinkhole on Lake County Road 2 yesterday evening. The road is back open again this morning, but crews and officials could be present in the area as the situation continues to be assessed. Photo: Leadville Today

Lake County Road and Bridge crews secure the area around a sinkhole on Lake County Road 2 yesterday evening. The road is back open again this morning, but crews and officials could be present in the area, as the situation continues to be assessed. Photo: Leadville Today

 

“It’s about 2 feet by two feet at the surface,” explained Mike Irwin, Lake County Public Works Asst. Director. “But underneath the asphalt it looks to be about 15 x 15.”

How deep will it go? Crews work on a sizable (15 ft. x 15 ft.) sinkhole on County Road 2. Photo: LC Road & Bridge.

How deep will it go? Crews work on a sizable (15 ft. x 15 ft.) sinkhole on County Road 2. Photo: LC Road & Bridge.

Therefore the road and bridge crew had a closure in place for several hours last night, for the street, more commonly known as the road to Black Cloud/Asarco . Once crews had secured a utility locate, gravel was trucked in to fill in the sinkhole.

“As it was dark by the time we got the hole filled, it is not really smooth and the asphalt has not been repaired, so be careful diving around this area,” stated the Lake County Road and Bridge Facebook Page. “The area is marked with cones. Be safe!”

It was also reported at the scene that the sensors at the nearby Yak Tunnel water Treatment Plant were also activated, indicating that the sinkhole could somehow be related to that system. Officials from the plant will be on scene today to access the situation.

Lake County Road 2 is now open, however travel in the area is not advised, as crews ad officials continue to work in the area and assess the situation. Last night the road was closed at the Newmont Mining Building, about a half mile about the Yak Tunnel Water Treatment Plant. Photo: Leadville Today

Lake County Road 2 is now open, however travel in the area is not advised, as crews ad officials continue to work in the area and assess the situation. Last night the road was closed at the Newmont Mining Building, about a half mile about the Yak Tunnel Water Treatment Plant. Photo: Leadville Today

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Meet The Candidates On Monday, September 29

Ready or not, the political season is in full swing, as candidates and ballot pushers make their march toward the November 4 Election Day.

To that end, Lake County will have its own chance to hear from local and state candidates, as well as what ballot initiatives that voters will find at the polls at the Meet The Candidates Night this Monday, Sept. 29 at 5:30 p.m. at Colorado Mountain College.

The evening provides voters with an opportunity to get to know the candidates, and their views on various issues.

Attendees will also have a chance to submit their questions. HOWEVER, please note that organizers are asking those who will be submitting questions, to arrive early between 5:15 – 5:30 p.m. The evening will adhere to a strict time schedule so that all candidates and ballot issues may be presented.

Leadville Today will also be recording the evening’s event and have it available on the website for voters who cannot attend. Stay Tuned! Stay Informed! VOTE on Tuesday November 4!

Fall Foliage Tour for Leadville Seniors Turns “Colorful”

Extreme Leaf-Peeping. That’s what many along for the ride were suggesting to rename the annual Phylis Hakala Mineral Belt Trail Fall Colors Tour in Leadville Today, when one of the vehicles got stuck along the way.  Everyone was okay and the van got unstuck thanks to the Lake County Road and Bridge crew's assist.  “Those young people can’t have ALL the high country adventures!”

Extreme Leaf-Peeping. That’s what many along for the ride were suggesting to rename the annual Phylis Hakala Mineral Belt Trail Fall Colors Tour, when one of the vehicles got stuck along the way yesterday. Everyone was okay and the van got “unstuck,” thanks to an assist from the Lake County Road and Bridge crew. Said one wise woman on the tour: “Those young people can’t have ALL the high country adventures!”

Obit_Spacer_Thin

“Friday Nights in Leadville” Continue Thru Winter

When something works in this town, and people support it, keep it going. And so it is, with the popular summer series “Friday Nights in Leadville,” which will continue, starting tonight September 26 with a Poetry Reading.

While the summer time organizers are taking a reprieve, the series will continue under the direction of Greg Labbe.

“In the future, I hope to hold poetry gatherings about once per month, and possibly meet at a variety of venues, especially if alcohol can be involved,” laughs Labbe. “We all know where the courage to read your poetry comes from!”

So dust off your favorite couplet, and join tonight’s literary fete at 7 p.m. at St. George Church, 200 W. 4th Street. Admission is free and everyone is invited to participate. For more information, call 303-641-1128.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Matchless Mine To Close for Season End of Month

The Matchless Mine in Leadville will officially close for the summer season on September 30, according to Steve Whittington, Executive Director of the National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum, which owns Tabor’s famous mine.Matchless Mine

So if you’re in town visiting, or have out-of-town guests, this will be your last weekend to to see where Horace made his millions and where Baby Doe Tabor spent her final days.

At least until next May when the popular tourist attraction will re-open for the summer season! For more information about the Matchless Mine, including tour schedule and price of admission, visit their website: LINK.

Mosquito Pass Closed to Thru Traffic Due to Rock Slide

Lake County Sheriff Rod Fenske reported this mornng that Mosquito Pass has been officialy closed to thru traffic for the season due to a rock slide reported on the Park County side early morning on Wednesday, Sept. 24. Residents can still access the Lake County Road 3 on the west side of the pass. Motorists are asked to use caution in this area as the landscape can be unstable.

Lake County Sheriff Rod Fenske reported this mornng that Mosquito Pass has been officialy closed to thru traffic for the season due to a rock slide reported on the Park County side early morning on Wednesday, Sept. 24. Residents can still access Lake County Road 3 on the west side of the pass. Motorists are asked to use extreme caution in this backcountry area as the landscape and road conditions can be unstable.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Frozen In Time. Gilman, located north of #Leadville on Highway 24, appears frozen in time, with only the seasons changing around the hillside town, which was once alive with families and activity.

Frozen In Time. Gilman, located north of Leadville on Highway 24, appears frozen in time, with only the seasons changing around the once vibrant, hillside community.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Happy Fall! “Weather” or Not: Winter Predictions

The weather. Seems like it’s always a topic of conversation but especially this time of year. The change in seasons is more evident, as that first round of snow appears on the mountains, or when the aspen leaves turn golden.

Fall Colors are at their peak along Leadville's Mineral Belt Trail.  And don't forget about the  Phylis Hakala MBT Fall Tour this Thursday.

Fall Colors are at their peak along Leadville’s Mineral Belt Trail. Don’t forget about the Phylis Hakala MBT Fall Tour, a motorized guide for the mobility-challenged on Thursday

And most mountain people seem to take on discussions of weather with such authority, as if they have a meteorology degree. Some announce the obvious: It’s snowing! It’s dumping! Look at those clouds! There’s a rainbow on the east side!

While others seem to simply repeat things they may have overheard, the old wives tales.

Leadville weather guy Charles Kuster gives his take on how much snow Leadville residents may be shoveling this season.

Leadville weather guy Charles Kuster gives his take on how much snow Leadville residents may be shoveling this season.

“There is very little scientific evidence to predicting the weather,” stated local weather guru Charles Kuster, who also owns The Book Mine in downtown Leadville.

What? You mean, all that Doppler Radar and El Nino/La Nina stuff isn’t true?! Well, maybe in short term weather patterns and predictions, but probably no more than a week out, explains Kuster, discussing the weather in his downtown book shop one recent late summer day.

So what about when the leaves change color at a different time? Isn’t there any truth to the notion that an early Fall leads to an early Winter? Nope, states Kuster. Well, what about the fact that the animals are on the move already? That the chipmunks and other forest critters seem to be storing up a bit sooner than usual, does that matter? Nope, that has nothing to do with whether or not we will have a long, cold snowy winter. But people like to think it does, laughed Kuster.2015-USFA-Winter-Map-625x422

Now, surely there’s some truth in the “Bible” of weather, The Farmer’s Almanac? It came out earlier this month and stated that Leadville is probably going to have the same kind of winter as the last, with lots of snow. Well, they might be good at predicting, but it’s still just that, a prediction, says the Leadville weather guy, anything further out than several days is a guess, there’s nothing scientific about it!

Interview with Charles Kuster After Record Snow Fall

Wow, talk about having your weather balloon getting busted! But wait, maybe there was a silver lining in that cloud. . . .

“In all the years (decades!) that I have kept weather records in Lake County,” said Kuster quietly, just as the hope of believing in meteorologists everywhere was about to fade away forever. “There is one consistent variable that has determined how a Leadville winter may look.”

Yes, Yes, what is it!? CLICK to find out what Kuster’s answer is!Obit_Spacer_Thin

Chicken Hill is one of Leadville's most unique neighborhoods, with glimpses of yesterday framed by golden aspens this time of year.

Chicken Hill is one of Leadville’s most unique neighborhoods, with glimpses of yesterday framed by golden aspens this time of year.

Motorized Tour of MBT’s Fall Colors Offered Sept. 25

Do you know someone who would love to get out and see the Fall Colors, but might not be mobile enough to do so? Well then, make plans to get them out on Leadville’s Mineral Belt Trail (MBT) to see Autumn’s high alpine beauty next Thursday, Sept. 25 for the Phylis Hakala MBT Fall Tour. This special tour is open to those individuals who do not wish to walk or bike the trail. The tour starts at 10 a.m.

Take advantage of this  once-a-year motorized tour of Leadville's Mineral Belt Trail coming up on Sept 25.

Take advantage of this once-a-year motorized tour of Leadville’s Mineral Belt Trail coming up on Sept 25.

Once a year, since the MBT was established in 2000, the county lets a caravan of motorized vehicles on the trail during the fall foliage season. This special tour allows senior citizens and those people with physical challenges, the opportunity to observe the spectacular scenery. The event was named after long-time Leadville resident Phylis Hakala, who always made sure that the seniors and those less mobile were able to get out and experience the beautiful natural beauty surroundings.

Participants will be riding in selected vans. Contact Loretta at the Senior Center to make a reservation: 719-486-1774.Obit_Spacer_Thin

September’s St. Pat’s Parade Planned for Sept. 20

There are certain things that happen in Leadville to signal that autumn is on its way: the kids go back to school, the leaves start to change – quickly, and the St. Patrick’s Day Parade is held. Wait, what?! Isn’t St. Patrick’s Day in March?StPats_2014SeptAd copy

Well, Leadville likes to celebrate its Irish heritage TWICE a year. Besides March weather can be cold and snowy for a proper parade, so why not do it again the third Saturday in March?!

This Saturday, Sept. 20 the Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in September starts at Noon at the top of Capitol Hill (in front of the Mining Museum), and marches down historic Harrison Avenue and straight into the Silver Dollar Saloon, Leadville’s Irish bar. The Queen City Pipe Band will be returning to provide all of the lively bagpipe music that spectators have come to expect!

This one-of-a-kind Colorado happening is a spin-off of the true Irish holiday celebrated six months earlier on March 17. Today, it’s one of the Cloud City’s favorite traditions.

The great thing about September’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade is that you never really know what’s going to happen. Some celebrations are unforgettable. Like the year, three bagpipe bands made the trip up. These musicians usually play the bigger parades for the real St. Patrick’s Day, but in September pure Irish luck prevails and the celebration is on! That year, during the procession’s usual stop in front of the Lake County Courthouse, all three bands played “Amazing Grace”. There wasn’t a dry eye on Harrison Avenue as the drums and bagpipes echoed across a perfect fall day, aspens ablaze amid Colorado’s two highest peaks.

The Queen City Pipe Bands will return to perform in the annual September's St. Patrick's Day Parade in downtown Leadville.

The Queen City Pipe Bands will return to perform in the annual September’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade on historic Harrison Avenue in downtown Leadville.

Other the years it seemed that the parade might not happen at all due to a lack of funds or clashing Irish personalities. There was one year when the parade marched a reverse route, starting at the south end of the avenue; it didn’t catch on though. Not only were people confused about where to meet before the parade, but the procession also had a hard time marching past the saloon with all the good Irish whiskey!

All marchers are welcome, meet in front of the National Mining Hall of Fame & Museum on W. 9thStreet just before noon. Don’t miss “Amazing Grace” as the parade stops in front of the courthouse. After the parade, the Queen City Pipe Band will play some great Irish tunes at the Silver Dollar Saloon. And Tony will be serving up some corned beef sandwiches as well. So, grad your shillelagh, pull on that green sweater and head up to Leadville for September’s Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Slainte!

This year's parade sponsors include the Shack Club and LeadvilleToday.com. Everyone welcome to march or just come and enjoy one of Leadville's quirky celebrations!

This year’s parade sponsors include the Shack Club and LeadvilleToday.com. Everyone is welcome to march or just come and enjoy one of Leadville’s quirky celebrations!

Library’s Annual Used Book Sale This Fri. & Sat.

This Friday and Saturday, Sept. 19-20 the Friends of Lake County Public Library will hold their annual Book Sale in Leadville’s 6th Street Gym from 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.

Hit the books, hit the gym at The Friends of Lake County Public Library's Annual Used Book Sale.

Hit the books, hit the gym at The Friends of Lake County Public Library’s Annual Used Book Sale this Friday and Saturday in Leadville.Photo: Leadville Today.

 

Books will be sold two pounds for a dollar. Hundreds of boxes of books were donated to the sale by the community.

According to the Lake County Public Library’s website, the Friends of Library raise money that enables the library to move from good to great, providing the resources for additional programming, much needed equipment, the children’s summer reading program and special events throughout the year.

Librray Book SaleThe work of the Friends highlights on an on-going basis the fact that the library is the cornerstone of the community providing opportunities for all to engage in the joy of life-long learning and connect with the thoughts and ideas of others from ages past to the present. Members of the Friends understand the critical importance of well funded libraries and advocate to ensure that the library gets the resources it needs to provide a wide variety of services to all ages including access to print and electronic materials, along with expert assistance in research, readers’ advisory, and children’s services.

The Friends’ time and commitment to the library set an example for all in how volunteerism leads to positive civic engagement and the betterment of the community. For more information: CLICKObit_Spacer_Thin

Storytime for the Younger Kids Resumes Sept. 25!

Storytime_Library

The Lake County Public Library will also start it’s FREE Weekly Storytime for Preschoolers on September 25. Storytime is held on Thursday Mornings, with Children ages 3 – 5 from 9 – 10 a.m., and Toddlers from 11 – 11:30 a.m. Every week there’s a different theme, including some special guests throughout the programs which continues through mid-May 2015.

For all the details, visit the Lake County Public Library website: LINK.

 

Mining Hall of Fame Inductees Honored Saturday

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum (NMHF&M) will be inducting four new members this Saturday, September 13 in Denver.

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Musuem.

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum.

Representing the domestic and worldwide metal production, education, and health and safety sectors of the industry, this year’s four inductees cover a diverse cross-section of the mining industry.

Harry M. Conger III, Günther Franz (Frank) Joklik, Ellen Swallow Richards, and Dr. Alfred Weiss will join 223 other mining industry pioneers at the 27th Annual Induction Banquet and Ceremony to be held this Saturday, Sept. 13 at The Westin in Downtown Denver. They were selected for being visionaries, leaders, and ambassadors, both within their own sectors and across the industry at large.

2014 Inductees:

Harry M. Conger III Conger_NMHF_InducteeHarry M. Conger was a great role model and strong advocate within Homestake Mining Company and among his industry peers on behalf of environmentally responsible, safe, profitable, and high-performance operations. As Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Conger was instrumental in revitalizing and rebuilding Homestake into an industry leader in technological advances and environmental protection. Full Biography.

Günther Franz (Frank) Joklik Joklik_NMHF_InducteeThrough his contributions in exploration, project development and operations management as Kennecott President and Chief Executive, Günther Franz (Frank) Joklik did much to strengthen Kennecott as a company and assisted in restoring the competitiveness of the U.S. mining industry. Full Biography.

Ellen Swallow Richards Richards_NMHF_InducteeEllen Henrietta (Swallow) Richards is generally recognized as the woman who founded ecology. She was the very definition of a pioneer in such diverse fields as chemistry, geology and mineralogy, mining and metallurgy, environmental science, public health, home economics, and education. Full Biography.

Dr. Alfred Weiss Weiss_NMHF_InducteeDr. Alfred Weiss was a true visionary in using quantitative methods and digital computers to aid mineral exploration, plan and design mines, operate mineral production facilities, and integrate the disparate information resources throughout a mining company into a modern management information system. Full Biography.

This Just In . . . .

The clouds cleared this morning with the weather report that Old Man Winter has begun his firm march into town.

The clouds cleared this morning with the weather report that Old Man Winter has begun his firm march into town. Photo: Leadville Today

Obit_Spacer_Thin

LT100 Belt Buckle Gift to Leadville B&B Owners

When it comes to the ultra running world, the Leadville Trail 100 Run belt buckle is a highly coveted prize, especially the “Under 25” hours buckle. Now, the only thing that might bump that up a level, is if it was an “old-school” buckle, the ones that were hand-hewn, one of the “originals.”

Mountain Hideaway Owners Peri (seated) and ed(standing) Solder proudly display their LT100 Belt Buckle gift from Ultra-Runner Kirk Apt who has completed 20 LT100 Runs. Photo: Leadville Today

Mountain Hideaway Owners Peri (seated) and Ed(standing) Solder proudly display their LT100 Belt Buckle gift from Ultra-Runner Kirk Apt who has completed 20 LT100 Runs. Photo: Leadville Today

That being said, what could possibly prompt a racer to part with one of these treasured trophies? Friendship and gratitude. And that’s the reason that local bed and breakfast owners, Peri and Ed Solder of Mountain Hideaway, now have one of these prized possessions hanging on their wall.

And for those who live and breathe the ultra-running world, the fact that the buckle was presented to them by Kirk Apt of Grand Junction, well that’s note-worthy in its own right. Apt, 52, is a legend in the ultra-running world. In fact, this year, he finished his 20th Hardrock and Leadville Trail 100 (LT100) Run.

“We were so honored,” said Ed Solder, owner of the Mountain Hideaway Bed & Breakfast where Apt has stayed during the last 10 of his 20 LT100s.

“It’s the first time, in the 25 years we’ve been doing this, that anybody has ever given us something this valuable as a thank you gift,” adds Peri, Ed’s wife and co-owner of the B&B, as she proudly displayed the buckle which Apt had framed in a shadow box for the Solder’s to display.

Peri added that when Apt presented the gift to the Solders, he expressed a deep gratitude, saying that the couple had made a big difference in his life and had been a big part of the Leadville race for him. And, Peri says, “He always looks like he’s doing a hike, he never looks like he’s racing one hundred miles.”

The LT100 belt buckle will fit in nicely with the rest of the sports memorabilia that surrounds the Solders and their B&B guests. In fact, it will help to balance out the loving tribute to another superstar athlete – Nate Solder, Peri and Ed’s son and offensive lineman for the NFL’s New England Patriots.

“We’ll definitely be taking it to North Carolina,” explained Peri, as the couple plans to spend winters back east, a bit closer to all the football action. “In Leadville, the buckle is important, but back there, it’ll be a real conversation piece, something people may not have heard about or ever seen.”

And who knows, maybe that gold and silver trophy will inspire some professional football players to take on the LT100 challenge and conquer more than that 120 yards that make up their home field.

But for Ultra-Runner Kirk Apt, the 19 buckles that remain in his respectable collection will have to suffice, as he has chosen to close out his LT100 ultra-career with victory #20.

“He said it’s his last one,” explains Peri. “But he’ll be back, to crew and encourage other racers.” And maybe to visit his buckle, now proudly on display and prepared to make it’s first tour on the NFL circuit!

Another Bites The Dust – Old Moose Lodge Demolished

Demolition work on the old "Moose Lodge," in Leadville began on Monday. Sept. 7. Photo: Leadville Today

Demolition work on the old “Moose Lodge,” in Leadville began on Monday. Sept. 7. Photo: Leadville Today

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Bye, Bye, Old Blue! The corner of W. 6th Street & Poplar will be a bit less blue with the demolition of the old blue Moose Lodge.The building was condemned by the city earlier this year. The soon-to-be-empty lots are for sale. Photo: Leadville Today

Bye, Bye, Old Blue! The corner of W. 6th Street & Poplar will be a bit less blue with the demolition of the old blue Moose Lodge.The building was condemned by the city earlier this year. The soon-to-be-empty lots are for sale. Photo: Leadville Today

Obit_Spacer_ThinRocky Mountain Family Health Fair This Saturday

This Saturday, Sept. 13, the Rocky Mountain Family Practice (Dr. Lisa’s Office) will hold its annual Adult/Children Health Fair starting at 7 a.m. The health fair gives residents an opportunity to take advantage of low cost blood screening for cholesterol, prostate, thyroid, diabetes, anemia and chemistry.

It's not ALL fun and games at the Rocky Mountain Family Practice's fair, residents can also get low-cost health screenings!

It’s not ALL fun and games at the Rocky Mountain Family Practice’s Health Fair, residents can also get low-cost health screenings!

The event will provide some great health care checks for children, including low cost FLU SHOTS and vaccines (they are also able to bill insurance), dental screenings, fluoride application, including car seat checks, and some fun and games, including a bouncy house & games and a bicycle rodeo!

It will also be a great opportunity to have your child talk to an emergency responder, including the ambulance/fire truck/sheriff’s office/Leadville Police and a visit from the Flight for Life Helicopter.

The big red fire engine from Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue is always a big hit with the kiddos!

The big red fire engine from Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue is always a big hit with the kiddos!

Colorado Grand® Car Rally in Leadville Tomorrow

The 26th Annual Colorado Grand® car rally will stop in Leadville, tomorrow, September 9, from noon – 4 p.m.

The 26th Annual Colorado Grand®  car rally will be in Leadville Tuesday

The 26th Annual Colorado Grand® car rally will be in Leadville Tuesday

The nearly 100 vintage vehicles will be headquartered at the historic Delaware and parked along East 7th Street. The group will visit Leadville shops and restaurants for their afternoon break, as well as gather for coffee and dessert at the hotel.

The Leadville stopover offers an opportunity of a lifetime to see and photograph vintage race cars. En route from Copper Mountain to Vail via Hwy 24, the cars will motor into Leadville and park on East 7th St. from Harrison to Poplar, thanks to the cooperative efforts of Leadville property owners and businesses. Spectators are invited to see them free of charge. Entrants from around the world will include pre-WWII Mercedes-Benz, Ferrari, Porsche, Bugatti, Alfa Romeo, Bentley, Aston Martin, Jaguar, Maserati, Allard, and such exotic names as Amilcar, Cisitalia, Squire, Delahaye, and Talbot-Lago. US models from Chrysler, Packard and Kurtis are also part of the lineup.

Nearly 100 vintage cars will be on display on E. 7th St. as the group makes a stop in Leadville.

Nearly 100 vintage cars will be on display on E. 7th Street in Leadville tomorrow.

The Colorado Grand® is an annual charity tour for 1960 and earlier sports and race cars of distinction. Every September at the peak of the fall color season approximately the vintage cars motor 1,000 miles in five days through the Rockies in a relaxed, non-competitive event. The event generates about $300,000 annually for small Colorado charities and Western Slope towns as well as college scholarships to graduating high-school seniors in those towns. Last year The Colorado Grand® made a donation to the Lake County Advocates as a thank you for Leadville’s hospitality. Other charities the Grand® supports include the Colorado State Patrol Family Foundation, the Robert Sutherland Foundation, Flight for Life, CASA, and medical facilities in small towns. Cumulative donations since 1989 are over $3.6 million.Obit_Spacer_Thin

National Al. on Mental Illness Gears Back Up For Fall

The Leadville National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) group will host a potluck dinner on Tuesday, Sept. 9 at 6:30 pm at Annie Livingston-Garrett’s, 310 East 8th Street in Leadville. NAMI_LogoAnyone who’s interested in finding out about NAMI is invited to join us. Any questions, or directions, please contact Annie Livingston-Garrett at 719-293-2302 or 615-636-5257.

Regular NAMI Meetings Offered in Lake County

The National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) will offer a Connections Support Group starting on the second and fourth Tuesday of the month, beginning on Tuesday, Sept. 22. This is a research-based support group for those with a mental illness. NAMI_Saying

The facilitators, Verena Wallace and Annie Livingston-Garrett, will lead each group using the national group guidelines, principles of support and stages of emotional support to trauma. This group is supported by NAMI Colorado and is offered to Leadville and Lake County residents. This group operates under confidentiality and is not therapy. There is no cost for this program.

NAMI invites you to join us as we restart this program in our community after our summer hiatus. We will meet at 6:30 pm at Colorado Mountain College in Room 408, Climax Building. If there are any questions, don’t hesitate to contact Annie Livingston-Garrett at 719-293-2302 or 615-636-5257.

Celebrate Literacy with a Leadville Author

Today is Read a Book Day, so it seemed like a good time to highlight a work from a Leadville author.

Grandpa_cover_book“Grandpa and the Tortoise Shell,” is a children’s book by first time author Dave Horning, of Leadville. In this Appalachian Trail tale, Horning’s grandson Josiah tells of his Grandpa setting out to hike a 700-mile journey. With an eye towards beauty, and simple gifts for the grandchildren, Grandpa finds a tortoise shell up on a mountain trail. This same shell, on a journey of its own, ends up as one of Josiah’s prized possessions: a tortoise shell lamp that sits by the child’s bedside to keep the scary things away at night.

Horning is a Leadville Pastor and Property Manager for Grand West Village Resorts , but out on the Appalachian Trail, he was known as Padre. Horning has made two different treks on the Appalachian Trail, one in 2001 and the next in 2012. The last third beckons sometime after he retires.

Pastor Dave Horning on the Appalachian Trail.

Pastor Dave Horning, aka “Padre” on the Appalachian Trail.

It is on his second journey, where the story comes to life. “Grandpa and the Tortoise Shell” contains elements of adventure, mystery, faith, and inter-generational relationships which are delightfully woven together in this true tale

Readers young and old, will be drawn into the joy of interaction with the great outdoors, understand how treasures don’t always come from a store, and get a taste of a family that cares and shares across the generations.

Horning has already had two book signings in Leadville over the summer, since his children’s book was first released in July.

“The one during the Leadville Trail 100 race was fun because I got to share stories with other trail-lovers,” said Horning.

For those who may have missed those Meet The Author events, there are more planned.Readers can stay connected via the “Grandpa and the Tortoise Shell” Facebook page. Or you can order the book online at Amazon.com or OutskirtsPress.org.

AUthor David J. Horning at one of his two Leadville book signings this summer for his new children's book. Photo: Leadville Today

AUthor David J. Horning at one of his two Leadville book signings this summer for his new children’s book. Photo: Leadville Today

About David Horning

Dave Horning, author of Grandpa and the Tortoise Shell, has hiked two thirds of the 2,175 miles of the Appalachian Trail. The last third beckons sometime after he retires. Following the gravitational pull that brought his three sons to the outdoor mecca of Colorado, Dave and his wife Jane live high in the Rocky Mountains in the city of Leadville, Colorado. In addition to his three sons, he now has three lovely daughters-in-law, ten grandchildren, and two grand nieces, all in close proximity. Dave’s desire is to plant in readers a love for the outdoors, and challenge them to a simpler path to life and fulfillment.

September’s St. Pat’s Parade Planned for Sept. 20

There are certain things that happen in Leadville to signal that autumn is on its way: the kids go back to school, the leaves start to change – quickly, and the St. Patrick’s Day Parade is held. Wait, what?! Isn’t St. Patrick’s Day in March?StPats_2014SeptAd copy

Well, Leadville likes to celebrate its Irish heritage TWICE a year. Besides March weather can be cold and snowy for a proper parade, so why not do it again the third Saturday in March?!

On Saturday, Sept. 20 the Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade in September starts at Noon at the top of Capitol Hill (in front of the Mining Museum), and marches down historic Harrison Avenue and straight into the Silver Dollar Saloon, Leadville’s Irish bar. And the Queen City Pipe Band will be returning to provide all of the lively bagpipe music that spectators have come to expect!

This one-of-a-kind Colorado happening is a spin-off of the true Irish holiday celebrated six months earlier on March 17. Today, it’s one of the Cloud City’s favorite traditions.

The great thing about September’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade is that you never really know what’s going to happen. Some celebrations are unforgettable. Like the year, three bagpipe bands made the trip up. These musicians usually play the bigger parades for the real St. Patrick’s Day, but in September pure Irish luck prevails and the celebration is on! That year, during the procession’s usual stop in front of the Lake County Courthouse, all three bands played “Amazing Grace”. There wasn’t a dry eye on Harrison Avenue as the drums and bagpipes echoed across a perfect fall day, aspens ablaze amid Colorado’s two highest peaks.

The Queen City Pipe Bands will return to perform in the annual September's St. Patrick's Day Parade in downtown Leadville.

The Queen City Pipe Bands will return to perform in the annual September’s St. Patrick’s Day Parade on historic Harrison Avenue in downtown Leadville.

Other the years it seemed that the parade might not happen at all due to a lack of funds or clashing Irish personalities. There was one year when the parade marched a reverse route, starting at the south end of the avenue; it didn’t catch on though. Not only were people confused about where to meet before the parade, but the procession also had a hard time marching past the saloon with all the good Irish whiskey!

All marchers are welcome, meet in front of the National Mining Hall of Fame & Museum on W. 9thStreet just before noon. Don’t miss “Amazing Grace” as the parade stops in front of the courthouse. After the parade, the Queen City Pipe Band will play some great Irish tunes at the Silver Dollar Saloon. And Tony will be serving up some corned beef sandwiches as well. So, grad your shillelagh, pull on that green sweater and head up to Leadville for September’s Annual St. Patrick’s Day Parade. Slainte!

This year's parade sponsors include the Shack Club and LeadvilleToday.com. Everyone welcome to march or just come and enjoy one of Leadville's quirky celebrations!

This year’s parade sponsors include the Shack Club and LeadvilleToday.com. Everyone is welcome to march or just come and enjoy one of Leadville’s quirky celebrations!

Celebrate 50 Years of the Wilderness Act This Saturday

The U.S. Forest Service (USFS), San Isabel National Forest, Leadville Ranger District and partners to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act at the Leadville National Fish Hatchery in Lake County on Saturday, Sept. 6.

A hike on the Leadville Fish Hatchery's 1-mile Nature Trail loop is one of many activities planned for this Saturday's (Sept. 6) Celebration

A hike on the Leadville Fish Hatchery’s 1-mile Nature Trail loop is one of many activities planned for this Saturday’s (Sept. 6) Celebration.

The free event runs from 10 a.m. – 2:30 p.m. with activities including a scavenger hunt, backcountry cooking demonstrations and presentations about wilderness etiquette. There will also be two “Walk for Wilderness” hikes; a 1-mile hike along the Nature Trail loop and a 2.5-mile Rock Creek Loop.

“Wilderness benefits everyone, whether you simply appreciate the existence of areas where the earth and its community of life are not controlled by humans, or enjoy experiencing it first-hand,” said Leadville District Recreation Planner Michelle Mueggler.

The Leadville National Fish Hatchery is located near the Mount Massive Wilderness Area. The hatchery is hosting the anniversary celebration because large events cannot be held within the Wilderness area because of restrictions on group size.

The Leadville National Fish Hatchery will be the spot for this Saturday's celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act .

The Leadville National Fish Hatchery will be the spot for this Saturday’s celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Wilderness Act .

Local partners hosting this event include the Upper Arkansas Wilderness Volunteers, the Greater Arkansas River Nature Association, Friends of the Leadville Fish Hatchery, and the Leadville Ranger District.

Family-friendly activities and demonstrations will include:

  • Scavenger hunt for wilderness facts
  • Cross cut saw demonstration
  • Wildlife display with “touchable” objects
  • Lake County Search and Rescue
  • Dutch oven cooking demonstration
  • Backcountry cooking demonstration
  • Tenkara fly fishing
  • Leave No Trace education
  • Invasive plant display
  • Horse packing and trail courtesy when meeting horses
  • Coloring center
  • Wilderness education

Wilderness 50 copyThe Wilderness Act was signed into law by President Lyndon Johnson on September 3, 1964. The Act established permanent protections for the nation’s most stunning scenery. Colorado boasts 43 designated Wilderness areas.

For additional information or to volunteer, please contact Michelle Mueggler the Leadville District Office at 719-486-0749.

BackToSchoolObit_Spacer_Thin

Leadville’s Tabor Opera House Could Have New Owner

“Oh, Danny Boy, the pipes, the pipes are calling
From glen to glen, and down the mountain side,
The summer’s gone, and all the roses falling,
It’s you, it’s you must go and I must bide.”

O Danny Boy” might have been the final song performed by FEAST Irish Band at the historic Tabor Opera House on August 23, but that doesn’t necessarily mean that the “fat lady sings” for the old Dame on historic Harrison Avenue. In fact, it could mean a whole new beginning.

The final performance for the 2014 season certainly provided the toe-tappin, hand-clappin opportunity usually featured by this Celtic band. But the program was also poised with ceremony, as local officials took the opportunity to honor owners Sharon and Bill Bland’s dedication to the theater, demonstrated during the 59 years of their family’s ownership. Leadville Mayor Jaime Stuever not only presented The Blands with a key to the city, but also awarded one (posthumously) to Sharon’s mother and long-time owner/caretaker of the opera house, Mrs. Evelyn Furman.

Also making note of the momentous occasion was Lake County Commissioner Mike Bordogna who proclaimed the evening, “ Tabor Opera House Night.”

Sharon and Bill Bland address a packed house for the final performance of the 2014 season.

Sharon and Bill Bland address a packed house for the final act of the 2014 season.

The main act did not disappoint, performing to a packed house, including many who enjoyed the show from balcony seats. Halfway through the bittersweet last performance, came a ray of hope concerning the venue’s future. The Blands introduced Paul Noel Fiorino, a registered agent with the Colorado Arts Consortium, a non-profit organization with a successful track record of saving theaters around Colorado.

And while nothing has been signed, or as they say in the opera world, “it ain’t over ‘til the fat lady sings,” Fiorino’s proposal and plan to save the 135-year-old opera house, “is the best ,” according to current owner Sharon Bland.

Paul Noel Fiorino

Paul Noel Fiorino

“I’ve been talking to them for quite a while – five years,” said Fiorino in an interview with Leadville Today. “And I guess, it finally got to the point where they said, ‘yeah, this is our last year.’”

In fact, it was in May at a pre-season dinner for volunteers that Bill Bland announced that the 2014 season would be their last one. Of course, the venue has been on the market for a while, and recently gained national attention when it was featured on the popular TV show “American Pickers.”

But at this point, the Blands have stated that Fiorino’s proposal is on the top of the heap. So what is that plan?

While the asking price for the Tabor Opera House is $1 million, the acquisition and renovation budget that Fiorino presents looks more like $5 million. And it should be noted, the grant that Fiorino has put together, tops out at $10 million, allowing for an endowment component to the model, building in some sustainability during the transition.

The last curtain call? FEAST Irish Band gave an incredible performance on August 23, the possible last show . . . ever?

The last curtain call? FEAST Irish Band gave an incredible performance on August 23, the possible last show . . . ever at the historic Tabor Opera House?

There’s no doubt that Fiorino has a passion for theater, after all, he’s a performer himself. A (former) professional ballet dancer, he began his career with Colorado Ballet. In fact in the 1970s, he performed at the Tabor Opera House and, more recently, with Denver-based Ballet Ariel this past May.

But Fiorino’s dedication goes far beyond the stage. The most recent feather in Fiorino’s cap is the Denver Civic Theatre, a theater complex south of downtown Denver, that was on the verge of closing, caught up in financial debt and bank repossession. Through his contacts with Colorado art-lovers, Fiorino was able to bring in an Evergreen businessman with the capitol to restore the venue into a cozy two-theater complex and thriving cultural hub for the area.

Leadville's Historic Tabor Opera House. Photo: Kathy Bedell

Leadville’s Historic Tabor Opera House.

“I have a heart for old theaters, a relationship with them,” states Fiorino, adding that he plans to restore the Tabor Opera House to its former glory.

“It’s a theater, but it’s also a museum that represents the performers of the past.” Fiorino adds. “We have a great opportunity to bring performers of the future — an opportunity to bring in top acts to Leadville.”

So where do things go from here? Fiorino will be returning to Leadville in two weeks to outline the details and has been working with the Leadville/Lake County Economic Development Corporation to connect with the local community.

“We are trying to get the Leadville folks to have the first charter contribution opportunity,” explained Fiorino. “We really feel like this is the town’s theater and that it needs to have a buy in from the community.” He wasn’t sure if that would be the opportunity to buy a plaque for a legacy wall, or maybe sponsor one of the theater’s ornate seats.

However, in the bigger picture, the local outreach is considered somewhat of a token start. From there, it will then expand to include the state of Colorado, and if need be, said Fiorino, bringing in his connections at the national level.

“I want Leadville folks to have the first opportunity. I want this NOT to be a real estate deal,” concluded Fiorino. “This is just a continuation of a theater that is being passed on with a renovation project. It is an awareness project of our great heritage, a preservation of our culture and museums.”Obit_Spacer_Thin

Beatles Tribute Band To Play The Scarlet Saturday

Not your everyday Beatles tribute band, Doctor Robert marks a new generation of tribute bands, bringing a thoroughly modern sound and feel to the Fab Four’s classics. The band is quickly becoming respected for its extended, high-energy sets including everything from “Please Please Me” to “Abbey Road,” and because no two shows are ever the same.

Doctor Robert is (left to right): Casey Falter, Ben Wright, Kevin Reinert, and Karen Janssen.

Doctor Robert is (l to r): Casey Falter, Ben Wright, Kevin Reinert, & Karen Janssen.

Dressed in mod-Beatles circa 1964, Doctor Robert relishes the challenge of recreating even the most demanding musical compositions in a live setting, often improvising during the performance. Like the quintessential Beatles tribute band, The Fab Faux, Doctor Robert does not attempt to impersonate the Beatles. For Ben Wright, Karen Janssen, Casey Falter, and Kevin Reinert, it’s all about the music and the infectious energy created when Beatles fans come together.

  • WHAT: Doctor Robert,The Beatles Tribute
  • WHEN: Saturday, September 6th @ 9:30pm
  • WHERE: The Scarlet Tavern, Leadville
  • This is a FREE 21+ show

Check out this video of the Doctor Robert, Beatles Tribute Band

The Leadville Lake Coounty Fire Rescue crew was out raiing money for Muscular Dystrophy with the "Fill The Boot" campaign held annually on Labor Day. Traffic was high throughout the day, and so were donations!

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue crew was out raising money for Muscular Dystrophy with the “Fill The Boot” campaign held annually on Labor Day. Traffic was high throughout the day on historic Harrison Avenue, hopefully, so were donations!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Ready, Aim, Fire – Hunting Season is Underway

The 2014 Colorado Hunting Season officially got underway on Saturday, August 30 with the opening of archery season. HuntignSignPostAnd while the thick of the season – rifle season – doesn’t start for another month, sportsmen and women have already been spotted (or not?) around town in their camouflage get-ups.

Hunters are good for the economy. They not only purchase hunting gear, trucks, ATVs and boats; they also fill their gas tanks and coolers. They stay at motels and resorts. They buy hunting clothes and those goofy hunting hats with sayings like, “If the Lead Don’t Fly, the Meat Don’t Fry.”

According to the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, 259,000 people hunt in Colorado each year. The group’s data states that hunters spend $221 million a year, on trip-related expenses in Colorado and $185 million on hunting equipment. It says a typical hunter spends $1,800 a year on hunting-related activities.

BigGame_Book_2014 copyObit_Spacer_ThinWhile other places in the state might not appreciate the hunters’ tourism dollars, Lake County is keenly aware of it. And maybe that’s because there is a large population of Leadville hunters, who recognize that wildlife recreation is an important component of the local economy.

Hunters also pay a truckload of special excise taxes, in the form of licenses, fees and equipment. In turn, those funds are earmarked for wildlife and habitat conservation.

And in Lake County, hunting has strong generational ties, with grandpas and granddaughters taking to the trail together, to stock the family’s freezer with fresh game for the winter. Many families rely on their Fall harvest to get them through until Spring!

Another benefit of hunting that should not be under-rated, is that it is good for body, mind and soul. As the world seems to spin faster and faster – even for alpine dwellers – hunting provides a healthy escape. It offers relaxation and affords quality time with family and friends, many times out of range of cell service or internet connection.

So, as the bright orange vests begin their annual migration into the Colorado high country, be sure to make them feel welcome, with a friendly elk bugle.

Rifle Hunting Season for elk doesn't start until October 1, 2014. Photo: David Hahn

Rifle Hunting Season for elk doesn’t start until October 1, 2014. Photo: David Hahn

Git 'Er Done! The north parking lot  at the Lake County Courthouse is coming along nicely thanks to efforts from Lake County Road and Bridge (yes, that's big boss Brad Palmer on the roller!). The lot should be fully paved by the week of Sept. 8 and will gain a couple of parking spots as well as two handicapped spots and a ADA compliant ramp which replaces the steps in the front.

Git ‘Er Done! The north parking lot at the Lake County Courthouse is coming along nicely thanks to efforts from Lake County Road and Bridge (yes, that’s the big boss Brad Palmer on the roller!). The lot should be fully paved by the week of Sept. 8 and will gain a couple of parking spots, as well as two handicapped spots, and a ADA compliant ramp which replaces the steps on the front lawn. Thanks for your patience!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Leadville Group Formed to Help New Moms

There is a local group that has assembled to provide support for Leadville moms. mother-breast-feeding-her-babyThe mom-to-mom breastfeeding support group will meet the 1st Monday of each month at 10 a.m., at 115 W. 6th St. in the R.J. McGregor Building (i.e. the old movie theater building, the workforce center building). The group’s first meeting will be THIS Monday, Sept. 1 at 10 a.m. Pregnant mamas and older children are welcome to join. They have also established a Facebook page, where people can connect with the group and get updates.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

New Indy Pass Book, Author In Town Next Saturday

Independence Pass – there’s not another like it! In his new book, High Road to Aspen, Paul Anderson tells the fascinating story of Independence Pass, one of the most spectacular in North America. He relates how the Pass became the main route to Aspen in the early 1880s as men, materials and money poured in from the booming metropolis of Leadville. Many of their adventures, tales and sagas are published here for the first time.Inde Pass Poster final

Next Saturday, August 27 the public is invited to a reception in honor of the new book on the lawn of the Healy House Museum. Attendees will have the opportunity to meet and visit with High Road to Aspen author Paul Anderson, the book’s photographer David Hiser, and designer Curt Carpenter.

Hiser is a renowned National Geographic photographer and has recorded Independence Pass in his breath-taking photographs, capturing the magnificent beauty of the Sawatch Range, and documenting the historical importance and ecological changes that have occurred. He has created a lasting memory of this beautiful corridor.

The evening will kick off with a reception at the Healy House and continue with a presentation and book signing at the AMAX Room at the Lake County Public Library. Here’s the timeline:

  • 5 – 6 pm: Reception at Healy House Museum, 912 Harrison Ave., Leadville.
  • 6 – 7 pm: Presentation and Book Signing at the AMAX Room, Lake County Public Library, 1115 Harrison Ave., Leadville
  • Reservations are suggested; Call 719-486-0487.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Free Download from Leadville Author – TODAY!

In other local literary news, Leadville author Carol Bellhouse is offering a FREE download of her latest book TODAY (August 23,2014). CloudShadow_BellhouseBellhouse’s “Cloud Shadow: Mountain Poetry and Photography,” is a collection of “Intensely intimate verse about a life in the Rockies, Cloud Shadow explores the aftermath of a lover’s death. Lost and lovely, joyous and angry, this is poetry at its most passionate and powerful.”

Described as “half Mary Poppins and half Tasmanian Devil,” Bellhouse is an attorney and writer hailing from Leadville, Colorado. According to her website, “Her life has never been boring.”Obit_Spacer_Thin

And Don’t Forget . . . the possible Last Curtain Call at the Historic Tabor Opera House TONIGHT!

For Details: LINK.2014posterFEASTXjpeg

Tabor Opera House’s Last Show (Ever?) Saturday

The last curtain call for the Historic Tabor Opera House is this Saturday, August 23. And that’s NOT just the last curtain call for the summer season, it could quite possibly be the last curtain call – PERIOD!

The sunset is reflected in the Historic Tabor Opera House windows at the end of a summer day. The last performance for the season - and possibly forever - will be this Saturday, August 23 in downtown Leadville. Photo: David Hahn.

The sunset is reflected in the Historic Tabor Opera House windows at the end of a summer day. The last performance for the season – and possibly forever – will be this Saturday, August 23 in downtown Leadville, Colorado. Photo: David Hahn.

After almost 60 years in the Furman family, owners Sharon and Bill Bland are offering one last encore performance before they say Good-Bye-For-Good. As many locals know the historic theater has been on the market for some time and peaked national attention when they were recently featured on the History Channel Series, “American Pickers.” But as the season draws to a close, there is no deal, no contract, no sale of this 135-year-old Harrison Avenue gem. And as they announced earlier, this will be their last summer.

The good news is there might be a solid buyer waiting in the wings. So here’s Sharon Bland with all the details:

Greetings!

You’re invited to join us for our last performance in this amazing historical building. Our family will be sharing memories and the potential new owner will be here to address the audience since his interest in purchasing, restoring and bringing this important part of Americas heritage back to full potential is a very strong asset.

A producer from the Colorado Arts Consortium has also contacted us and plans on being there to gather information for the story. Who knows, maybe Mike and Frank from American Pickers will show up since they have now become an important part of our history by airing “Mountain Mayhem” which shared our plight to millions across the country.

But this is a time we’ve planned as a joyful celebration of almost 60 years of Furman family ownership during which we’ve made many memories with locals and people from all over the world who love this history and the time they’ve spent here. The Tabor Opera House’s Facebook Page has become our scrapbook as we share as many “happenings” during these last few months with our friends.

We would appreciate you joining us for one last performance. Bill and I have brought in the very best of performers to celebrate all the “Magical Moments in History” that this grand old building has provided since 1879. We want to go out with an exciting celebration and tribute to the amazing history and the peoples it embodied over the period of 135 years.

Please join us as we celebrate the past 60 years with vigor, and the spirit of the Tabor Opera House in Leadville Colorado: In honor of the Leadville community, admission has been priced at 50% off (from $30 to $15 for general admission) to allow everyone an opportunity to celebrate our last performance at the opera house together. General Admission Adults $15. Limited number of VIP Dinner/Theater packages available $45: includes prime reserved seating, private wine and cheese reception prior to the show and a “meet and greet” on-stage after the show. Call 719-486-8409 or order on-line at www.taboroperahouse.net for tickets.

Sharon and Bill Bland

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Irish Band to Play Opera House’s Last (?) Performance

Saturday, Aug. 23, at 7:30 p.m. FEAST, an Irish band with Champion Irish Dancers will rock the house with their amazing energy and talent. FEAST’s spectacular Irish music and dance show, “Celtica Sinfonia”, sold out all venues in March 2009 and was filmed by Rocky Mountain PBS during their performance at the prestigious Vilar Performing Arts Center in Beaver Creek (FEAST was immediately engaged by the Vilar for the following season!)

The film aired March 2010, just as FEAST was performing “Celtica Sinfonia II”, an all-new program, to over 2500 wildly enthusiastic people in three cities. The show was again filmed by Rocky Mountain PBS, this time in high-def, with plans to shoot for a national airing. Celtica Sinfonia was meanwhile submitted for an Emmy. In addition to numerous concerts in Colorado, Montana, and New Mexico, FEAST has twice toured Germany with great success. 2011 saw the group touring with another new show, KeltikFyre, and in 2012 another hit show, Irish Thunder.2014posterFEASTXjpeg

LT100 Legends: The Sixth Street Partiers

The “Sixth Street partiers”. If you’ve read the best-selling book, “Born To Run,” by Christopher McDougall, you might be familiar with this group. Or, if you’ve been around the Leadville Ultra scene, it’s hard not to notice the revelry happening at the top of 6th Street during the start of the Leadville Trail 100 (LT100) Run.

Your "Sixth Street Partiers" hosts: Dan and Roe Mooney. Photo: Leadville Today.

Your “Sixth Street Partiers” hosts: Dan and Roe Mooney. Photo: Leadville Today.

They are a rambunctious group of fans, who have albeit, become an urban legend since McDougall’s book hit the New York Times best seller list in 2009. However, for locals, the gathering is simply known as Danny and Roe Mooney’s “Trail 100” party!

And like many tales, especially those associated with the LT100, some are true and some are tall tales. Now, if you’re up for local folklore, you’ll accept McDougall’s report: “Every year, Leadville’s Sixth Street partiers cowboy up and spend the weekend trying to outlast the runners. They start pounding at the blast of the starting gun and keep downing ‘em until the race officially ends thirty hours later.”

However, according to hostess Roe Mooney, the Trail 100 party is a bit more subdued.

“When we first moved to W. 6th Street, the residents were asked to leave a light on, to show support for the racers,” explains Mooney. “And Danny said, Well, we can do better than that!”

Like no aid station you've eve seen, the Mooney's Trail 100 Party is filled with good food and lots of cheering and support for racers!

Like no aid station you’ve ever seen, the Mooney’s Trail 100 Party, is filled with good food and lots of cheering and support for LT100 racers!

So for the past 18 years, the Mooneys have hosted a full on “we-support-the-runners” party. Every August, these W. 6th Street residents and their pajama-clad friends, stand on their front lawn, blasting Bruce Springsteen’s “Born To Run,” and the theme from the movie “Rocky,” cheer on the runners, sending them off, into the first dawn, of the two most racers will likely see in this epic 30-hour, 100-mile Ultra marathon.

And while the “Born To Run” account describes a 30-hour party, “that’s not exactly true,” states Mooney.

“While we really appreciated him (McDougall) putting us in the book, a couple of things he said were not true!” explains Mooney. For example, by no means, does the party rage on until the first runner comes back in, much less the last racer!

“We’ve always started at 3:30 – 4 a.m. for the start of the race,” says Mooney. “And our neighbors are always real nice about it. They either come or if they don’t, they don’t call the cops on us.”

So how late does the party go? Well, that all depends, says Roe.

“We usually keep the music blaring until all the runners and support crew pass by, and then we bring the speakers inside and have breakfast.” As far as Roe recalls, the latest guests they’ve ever had at the party was until 2 or 3 o’clock in the afternoon, hours before any LT100 racers are even near the finish line.

Other memorable years include the 2012 race, when the Mooneys daughter Alison, paced Leadville racer Jared Roberts for 30 miles and at the end of the day she also became engaged! Then last year, Roe’s colleague Lisa Morton finished the LT100 Run on her second attempt. And there was another incident, years ago, when one of the runners stopped in at the Mooneys for a bathroom break, not even a mile out on the course!

“We’ve gotten some real nice letters over the years, from people thanking us for the show of support,” concludes Mooney. So whether you need a quick “pit-stop” or a “Only 99 miles to go!” cheer from the Sixth Street partiers, runners can count on the Mooneys to “leave a light” on for LT100 racers!

The LT100 "Sixth Street partiers" inspiring runners one beer at a time!

The LT100 “Sixth Street partiers” inspiring runners one beer at a time!

Orthopedic Sports Medicine expands to Leadville

The Heart of the Rockies Regional Medical Center (HRRMC) Orthopedic Sports Medicine Center is expanding its practice to Leadville beginning Thursday, Aug. 21. Appointments are available with Karli Dimino, PA-C, two Thursdays per month at St. Vincent Hospital Outpatient Services, 822 W. 4th Street.

Karli Dimino, PA-C

Karli Dimino

Dimino is a certified physician assistant who earned her master’s degree in physician assistant studies, with a specialty in orthopedics, from the University of Nebraska School of Medicine. She sees patients on behalf of Dr. Robert Hunter, director of the HRRMC Orthopedic Sports Medicine Center and HRRMC Orthopedic Center of Excellence. Dimino will evaluate new patients, order diagnostic tests, and discuss and plan surgery.

Dr. Robert Hunter

Dr. Robert Hunter

Dr. Hunter is a board-certified orthopedic surgeon at Heart of the Rockies Regional Medical Center in Salida. Services he provides in Salida include treatment for knee and shoulder injuries, arthroscopic and open repair of torn ligaments, and management of athletic injuries. Year after Year, Dr. Hunter has been voted one of the Best Doctors in America by his peers.To make an orthopedic appointment in Leadville, call 719-530-2000.Obit_Spacer_Thin

SVH_MeetObit_Spacer_Thin

BabyGirlVigil_BirthAnnouncement

Obit_Spacer_Thin

TV Show Casting Call – Renovate Your Cabin!

Are you in the market for a rustic cabin that might need a little work? Have you been scouting around Lake County for that perfect second home or vacation getaway?

Could "Rustic Reno" be Lake County Realtors' Dream-Come-True!?

Could “Rustic Reno” be a Dream-Come-True for the Lake County Real Estate market!? Stay Tuned!

Well, then listen up because here’s your chance to be a part of Rustic Renos, a new reality TV show where buyers get some help to “reno (renovate)” their cabin, give it a beautiful new look or restore it to its former glory!

Leadville Today first saw the “casting call” on the social media feeds, as TV producers were scouting for people from Eagle, Summit, Grand, Routt, Pitkin and Garfield Counties.

A quick call to Casting Director, Dave Virgo of Tri Con Films, out of Canada, resulted in adding Lake County to the list. After all, finding a cabin in need of “reno” is more likely to occur in Lake, than say, Pitkin County, isn’t it?

“At this stage,” said Virgo in a phone interview, “We are trying to make a pilot for the TV show. So, we are trying to find people who are in the market, and ready to buy a cabin.”

Mountains - Check! Cabins - Check! Star Power - Check?

Mountains – Check! Cabins – Check! Star Power – Time will tell, call today!

The conclusion, explained Virgo, would be the buyer purchasing the cabin, including a budget for fixing things up, which would then be matched by the Rustic Renos‘ producers, in addition to a team of experts to help with the “reno.”

Of course, TV networks always like to see young, active families, enthusiastic about helping to create their dream cabin. And there certainly seems to be more and more of those in Lake County. So if you fall into that category, and have been thinking about purchasing a cabin, why not give it a shot. But do it soon, as the producers anticipate being on the ground next month (September), meeting with possible cast members and scouting for cabins!

Here are the specifics from the casting call:Tricon-Logo

RUSTIC RENOS A new Cabin/Cottage Renovation TV Show is casting! TV production company is looking for cabin/cottage buyers in Colorado for a new TV renovation show. If you have a family and are aged between 25 to 50 and are about to purchase a cabin and/or renovate your own cabin, we want to hear from you. Requirements are that you must have a budget to renovate and intend to buy your cabin or cottage within Lake, Eagle, Summit, Grand, Routt, Pitkin and Garfield County. We’ll reno your cabin or cottage, give it a beautiful look and restore it to its glory! If this is of interest to you get in touch now! Email Irada Seli at irada.seli@triconfilms.com.

Or hey, just call Casting Director Dave Virgo directly at 416-341-9926.Obit_Spacer_Thin

The Scarlet Bar’s Mural Sneak Peak on Wednesday

After more than a year of planning, local voters’ choice, and permit hurdles, the mural will finally be going up on the north wall of The Scarlet Bar!

In a contest sponsored by PBR and The Scarlet Bar, Lexie Palmore's work (middle) which depicts a number of well-known Leadville characters watching a painter was the winner. Photo: Leadville Today

In a contest sponsored by PBR and The Scarlet Bar, Lexie Palmore’s work (middle) which depicts a number of well-known Leadville characters watching a painter was the winner. Photo: Leadville Today

This Wednesday, August 13, is the unveiling of The Scarlet‘s Pabst Blue Ribbon “Legends Mural.” The public will be able to see a sneak peak of Leadville Artist Lexie Palmore’s mural design, which depicts a number of well-known Leadville “characters.”

The event has been rolled into a party, complete with live music by The Black Lillies, with local favorite Leadville Cherokee. The fun starts at 7 p.m. on the corner of 4th and Harrison in historic downtown Leadville.Mural Celebration (1)
monday_BoomDays

Semes Honored as Grand Marshals for Parade

The term Grand Marshal is a ceremonial title of very high honor. So it seems only fitting that Pastime Saloon owners Roy and Jerry Seme would carry the honor of Grand Marshals for this year’s Boom Days Parade. After all, when your family name has carried on the last operating business on old State Street for over 75 years, it should be worth a little feather in your cap . . . or boa!

Roy and Jerry Seme pose for a picture in Wild West costumes

Roy and Jerry Seme pose for a picture in Wild West costumes

For those unfamiliar with its history, the Pastime is the last operating saloon on old notorious State Street, now 2nd Street, where there was once 64 saloons. Built in 1878, the building served as a dance hall and gambling saloon and its early history cites numerous name and ownership changes, including Maxey Tabor, son of Horace Tabor.

The Pastime Saloon is the last operating saloon on historic State Street where there once was 64 saloons.

The Pastime Saloon is the last operating saloon on historic State Street where there once was 64 saloons.

In 1879, it was the Antheneum Theater. In those early days it was considered the most popular, most spectacular amphitheater in Leadville. During this short-lived entertainment craze, amphitheaters offered physical endurance contests – male and female running and walking matches. The races, the prizefights and the wrestling bouts were often special Sunday afternoon features. At the Antheneum (Pastime), one of the popular acts was a trapeze artist trundling a wheelbarrow back and forth across the tightrope which stretched out inside the building – above peoples’ heads!

Leadville Mayor places a commemorative street sign marking the Boom Days celebration of historic State Street.

Leadville Mayor places a commemorative street sign marking the Boom Days celebration of historic State Street.

Since the 1920s, the Pastime was been characterized by owners who did not buy and sell overnight, riding out the ups and downs of business in Leadville. During the Camp Hale days army officials had declared State Street off-limits due to its lingering “red light district” reputation. This made it perfect for local people to find an uncrowded place for dining, drinking and dancing, especially on Saturday night.

Lorinda Seme (left) poses under the special Historic State Street sign with Leadville Mayor Jaime Stuever. The Seme family has owned and operated the Pastime Saloon for over 75 years.

Lorinda Seme (left) poses under the special Historic State Street sign with Leadville Mayor Jaime Stuever. The Seme family has owned and operated the Pastime Saloon for over 75 years.

Over the years, old State Street was plagued by a series of fires, taking a building or two at time until most of the old bordellos and gambling halls vanished into history. The early 1950s brought the last great fire, which left standing only the Pastime and the Pioneer.

In 1938, Frank (Roy’s father) Seme purchased the building and business, renaming it the Pastime Bar and Café. The business’ hospitality and popularity continued into the 1950s. At one time, there were 13 girls on the floor and two bartenders.

The Pastime has remained in the Seme family ever since. Current owner Roy and his wife Jerry have kept up the family tradition, with their daughters Lorinda, Tina and Tammy for over 50 years.

Today’s Pastime is still one-of-a-kind. So stop in to see the family, grab a buffalo burger and cold beer and talk about the good old days!

Roy and Jerry Seme, Owners of The Pastime Saloon will be honored as The Grand Marshals in the 2014 Boom Days Parade.

Roy and Jerry Seme, Owners of The Pastime Saloon will be honored as The Grand Marshals in the 2014 Boom Days Parade.

 

Fall is Here . . . on the Community Park Mural

While most locals would agree that they don’t want to see the fall season come on any faster than it already seems to be, this “Fall” is a welcome sight!

Leadville art teachers and students install the final season on the Community Park mural. Fall is here! Great Job!

Leadville art teachers and students install the final season on the Community Park mural. Fall is here! Great Job! Thanks to the Leadville Arts Coalition and Climax Mine.

The “Four Season” mural at the Community Park is now complete with the fourth “Fall” wall installed on July 29. As part of the ceramic mural which wraps the restroom building at the popular sports facility, the final season was installed by local artists, teachers, and students on Tuesday, July 29.

These ceramic "leaf" tiles were made by Leadville students.

These ceramic “leaves” are part of the “Fall” wall and were made by Leadville students.

Project Directors Amanda Good, Ann Stanek and Erin Farrow have hosted an after school art class for Lake County high school and middle school students during the past couple of years. Students designed and produced the custom tiles that were adhered to the four walls, each side representing a different season.

The “Fall” or north side of the building was the last custom tile mural installation which is sponsored by the Leadville Arts Coalition and funded by the Climax Community Grant and the 21st Century Fund. The mural is beautiful and adds so much to the Community Park – thank you!Obit_Spacer_Thin
125YrAnniv_FishHatchery

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Celebrating 14 yrs of MBT and the Martin Bridge!

The Martin Bridge. Do you know where it is? If so, then you’ve been spending some time on Leadville’s Mineral Belt Trail (MBT). In honor of the MBT’s 14th birthday, here’s the story of how the Martin Bridge got its name.

The Martin Bridge crosses over E. 7th Street on Leadville's Mineral Belt Trail.

The Martin Bridge crosses over E. 7th Street on Leadville’s Mineral Belt Trail.

Now, for those who may not be familiar with where this structure is, it spans above E. 7th Street, connecting the MBT over the city road; it’s near the famous Matchless Mine.

And while many regular MBT users may be familiar with where the bridge is, not many folks know how the Martin Bridge got its name. It is one of those great, old-school Leadville stories. From the beginning, the decision was rooted in common sense; there were no committees, work sessions, studies or grants involved. Back in 1999, the city and county coffers were pretty slim, so those who had stuck around to “serve,” had to “make do”. They had to think smarter; do more, with less.

And what better place to think smarter than around a table of hard-working, beer-drinking guys at the legendary Silver Dollar Saloon. One of the regulars at that table was Jim Martin, a former Climax Mine Manager who decided to stick around, and was seeing Leadville and Lake County through some of its shakier days.

Martin was Leadville’s Mayor for 8 years, from 1983 – 1991; he then went on to serve two terms as Lake County Commissioner from 1992 – 2000. Martin also served on the Board of Education and was very involved with Skyline Little League, as both a board member and umpire during baseball season.

The man and the bridge! Namsake Jim Martin (right) poses with good friend and owner of The Rock Hut, Jim Witmer (left) on the MBT's Martin Bridge. Photo: Kathy Bedell/LeadvilleToday.

The man and the bridge! Namesake Jim Martin (right) poses with good friend and owner of The Rock Hut, Jim Witmer (left) on the MBT’s Martin Bridge.

Jim Martin was a hard-core numbers guy. He was known to test people with a series of mathematical equations, to determine their mental prowess. The drill would usually go something like, take the number 6 multiple it by eight, subtract 7, divide by three, now take the square root of that number – and on and on he would go. This mathematical quiz was rambled off at a pretty good pace, and just when you were convinced that Martin himself wasn’t even following the equation, you were challenged to provide the answer. If you were spry enough to keep up with him and come to the same correct answer as Martin’s, then your “street cred,” rose considerably; maybe he’d even throw you a news tidbit.

Local leadership during this time, required that same kind of steadfastness. Things were still in a downward spiral, and most public meetings were held to discuss how to shave a bit more off the budget, rather than, what duplicated non-profit’s efforts should get more funding. Back then, it was a bit more “Shark Tank” and a little less “Kumbaya”.

A guy like Jim Martin was up for the job, and he did an incredible service to this community during that time. It was easy to respect his willingness to serve during the bust cycle. He earned it every day as he kept the Environmental Protection Agency on its toes, and away from encroaching any further onto local lands, an act which was slowly choking economic development in Lake County.

A great sense of humor is one tool that will get you through 20+ years of public service. Jim Martin (left) poses on the bridge named after him, with good friend Jim Witmer, both of whom will be appalled that their picture appears here! Photo: Kathy Bedell/Leadville Today.

A great sense of humor is one tool that will get you through 20+ years of public service. Jim Martin (left) poses on the bridge that bears his name, with good friend Jim Witmer, both of whom will be appalled that their picture appears here!

He was asked one time if it was harder to be Mayor or Commissioner? Martin retorted, “You know what was the toughest job I ever had in this town? Umpire for the Little League. Those parents were brutal! If they didn’t like a call, they didn’t hold back! They’d swear you up one side and down the other, right in front of the kids!”

During one of these famous beer-drinking work sessions – when Martin was absent – the rest of the guys discussed how they might be able to honor him. It was 1999 and Martin was coming to the end of his political career. While there wasn’t a lot of money in the coffers for some elaborate gesture, surely there was something they could do.

It was during this same time that the Mineral Belt Trail was reaching the end of its trail work and would soon be holding its Grand Opening on July 29, 2000. Before long, operation “Martin Bridge” was underway. In the spirit of, “just-order-the-signs”, “it’s-easier-to-ask-forgiveness-than-permission” ways of not too long ago, that MBT bridge was ceremoniously named The Martin Bridge!

Jim Martin eventually made the move down to a lower elevation and today, lives comfortably in the Denver metro area. He makes it up here every once in a while. Only now, you’re more likely to see him with a bottle of oxygen, than a bottle of whiskey. He’s still sharp mentally, even if the memory for names has faded a bit. And yes, the old beer-drinking sessions pick up right where they left off, although they don’t last nearly as long as they used to.

So the next time you walk, jog, bicycle, or ski by the MBT’s Martin Bridge, give Jim Martin a proper salute – cheers! And Happy Birthday to the Mineral Belt Trail, which celebrates 14 incredible years today!

 

The Tabor Home’s historic “off-white” color was recently restored and some patriotic bunting added. It looks great! Augusta Tabor (Horace’s first wife) would have liked it! It was “her” home, after all. Photo: Leadville Today.

The Tabor Home’s historic “off-white” color was recently restored and some patriotic bunting added. It looks great! Augusta Tabor (Horace’s first wife) would have liked it! It was “her” home, after all. You can find it on E. 5th Street. Photo: Leadville Today.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Manuelita’s Expands with Bar, Grand Opening Tonight!

Their famous fish tacos might bring you through the door the first time, but Mauelita’s Restaurant friendly service will bring you back time after time until you’ve tried everything on the menu, glad that you did.

Manuelita's Owner Federico Montes (left) and Cesar Lazo (right) at your service at the new bar in their popular downtown eatery. Salud! Manuelita's Owner Federico Montes (left) and Cesar Lazo (right) at your service at the new bar in their popular downtown eatery. Salud!

Manuelita’s Owner Federico Montes (left) and Cesar Lazo (right) at your service at the new bar in their popular downtown eatery. Salud!

And now, you can linger a little longer in the evening in the new bar in the back of this downtown Leadville eatery. The bar will officially open tonight, July 25. To kick things off, Owner Federico Montes is giving away 5 free pitchers to the first five customers, starting at 6 p.m. They have Pacifico and Dos Equis Lager on tap. They will also have Grand Opening drink specials.

Cerveza on tap: Dos Equis Lager and Pacífico.

Cerveza on tap: Dos Equis Lager & Pacífico.

Starting tonight, Manuelita’s Bar will be open on Thursday, Friday, Saturday, and Sunday until 2 a.m. And of course, you can still join them for lunch or dinner.

And yes, the fish tacos come highly recommended, and one of the best deals in town!

Felicidades Federico! Y Salud a Manuelita’s Bar!

 

Boomtown Music Festival in Lake County This Weekend

Have you heard the word? Maybe you’ve seen the small flyers up around town? Or perhaps the event has come up on your Facebook news feed?

The Boomtown "Beta Test" Music Festival where 22 musical acts will be performing this weekend at the bast of Mt. Elbert at the Smith-Parsons Ranch, south of Leadville. Photo: Leadville Today.

The Boomtown “Beta Test” Music Festival stage, where 22 musical acts will be performing this weekend at the bast of Mt. Elbert, south of Leadville.

There is a music festival going on this weekend in southern Lake County that could explode into the next big thing. The Boomtown “Beta Test” Music Festival is a three day “experimental” festival featuring local musicians, artists, and yoga! The whole thing is happening at the historic Smith-Parsons Ranch located several miles south of Leadville, off County Road 10 or what is more commonly known as Sure Pretty Drive.

“Our family ranch has owned and operated this hay ranch for 100 years, for three generations,” said Joseph Smith in an interview with Leadville Today. And while haying only takes place a few months of the year, the rest of the time the family spends enjoying the beauty which surrounds their private property at the foot of Colorado’s highest peak, Mt. Elbert.

A good time in the old "Boomtown" this weekend. Photo: Leadville Today

A good time in the old “Boomtown” this weekend. Photo: Leadville Today

“We decided that we wanted to share that with the greater community, because we find it to be one of the most beautiful places. And we want to open it up a little bit,” said Smith.

By “a little bit,” Smith means holding a three-day musical festival that will be capped at 300 attendees, this year.

“I’ve been going to music festivals for about six years now and it’s really changed my perspective on the world, the way that people treat each other,” explained Smith, referring to the way that “a temporary community influences human interaction.”

So from those experiences came the Boomtown “Beta Test” Music Festival. So why Beta Test? Well, by definition, beta testing is the last stage of testing; generally thought of as a test for a computer product prior to commercial release. In other words, if things go well this year, the event will become an annual Lake County event.

Music and the arts will meet up with some pretty incredible scenery.

Music and the arts will meet up with some pretty incredible scenery at the Smith-Parsons Ranch.

And even for a “beta test,” the Boomtown schedule of events is pretty impressive: 22 musical performances, yoga sessions, and artists displaying their creations. Tickets are $50 per person and can be purchased online at the Boomtown Festival website, or you can also purchase them at the gate (cash only).

Admission includes on site camping. Rustic car camping sites and port-a-potties will be available on the private ranch land. No showers or electricity will be available. They can also accommodate RVs, but there are no hookups.

Of course, the event has gone through all of the necessary permitting processes and organizers will have a security detail in place as well.

“Lake County has been extremely helpful with the whole planning process,” said Smith. And yesterday county officials did visit the site to make sure all safety concerns and crowd control issues were addressed.

Follow the signs to the first Boomtown "Beta Test" Music Festival, south of Leadville.

Follow the signs to the first Boomtown “Beta Test” Music Festival, south of Leadville.

So there you have it, sounds like the base of Mt. Elbert is going to be the spot for great music and good times this weekend.

“Join us on the first step of our journey towards building a new festival venue and outdoor art gallery,” states the Boomtown website. “Our goal is to encourage creativity and expression in the local community while developing a unique venue in the Colorado high country!”

The Smith-Parsons Ranch is located at 1322 County Road 24A. Take Sure Pretty Drive south and follow the signs, turning off at County Road 24A. The Ranch will open at noon tomorrow, Friday, July 25 and will close at 8 p.m. on Sunday, July 27.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Leadville Fish Hatchery Marks 125 Years on Saturday!

The public is invited to the 125th anniversary of the Leadville National Fish Hatchery this Saturday, July 26. A fun, action-packed schedule of events is planned.

Celebrating 125 years on July 26: The Leadville National Fish Hatchery

Celebrating 125 years on July 26: The Leadville National Fish Hatchery

The day starts at 10 a.m. in front of the main hatchery building for welcome and remarks. At 11 a.m. the hatchery building will be open for tours, with guides stationed both inside and outside toprovide information.

Join the picnic at the beautiful new pavilion, made possible by the Friends of the Leadville National Fish Hatchery.

Join the picnic at the beautiful new pavilion, made possible by the Friends of the Leadville Fish Hatchery.

At noon, the party will move up to the picnic grounds where you can eat a BYO lunch or purchase a pulled pork sandwich plate with coleslaw and beans for $6 from the Leadville Lions Club. Stick around, because free cake, ice cream and lemonade will be served at 1 p.m.

Afternoon activities include a horseshoe pitching tournament, a demonstration of Tenkara fly fishing at Evergreen Lake, adjacent to the picnic grounds, and a presentation on the history and use of labyrinths. Fun for the kids includes face painting, a bean bag toss game, and trying their hand at a fishing “pond.”

At 4:30 p.m. down at the main hatchery building there will be a Victorian costume contest and local band Leadville Cherokee will play out the celebration, starting at 5:00 p.m.

Come, and celebrate the fish!

Come, and celebrate the fish!

Leadville National Fish Hatchery History:

School children look forward to their visit to the hatchery each year!

School children look forward to their visit to the Leadville Fish Hatchery!

Construction of the Leadville National Fish Hatchery began in 1889. Initially the hatchery supplied eggs and fingerling fish to streams and lakes throughout Colorado, the western U.S. and even to Europe and Japan.

Currently, the hatchery supplies 10 inch catchable trout to Turquoise Lake, the Forebay, Twin Lakes, and Clear Creek in Chaffee County. The hatchery is also the location of one of three populations of the endangered greenback cutthroat trout. The federal hatchery system originated as a way to ameliorate the negative effect on native fish populations from mining, logging, ranching, stocking of non-native species and over-fishing.

The Leadville National Fish Hatchery still plays a role in mitigating the impacts of these activities. Additionally, it has become a well-loved destination for historical tourism and out-door enthusiasts. Reunions, school functions and special events are often held at the picnic grounds.

For additional information contact Judy Cole at 719-486-0176.FishHatcheryCelebrationObit_Spacer_Thin

Pathways_Fishing_LeadvilleToday copy

Pianist Cendejas to Raise Funds for Fire Department

What do you get when you bring together a concert pianist, a fire chief, an opera house and 100 miles of trail? An evening of incredible music, for an alarmingly good cause!

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue Department (from left to right) Firefighter Adam Olson, Captain Sean Simon, Captain Bill Burns, and Fire Chief Dan Dailey pictured with Pianist Javier Cendejas who will be performing a benefit concert at the Tabor Opera House on July 31.

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue Department (from left to right) Firefighter Adam Olson, Captain Sean Simon, Captain Bill Burns, and Fire Chief Dan Dailey pictured with Pianist Javier Cendejas who will be performing a benefit concert at the Tabor Opera House on July 31. Photo: Leadville Today.

On Thursday, July 31 accomplished concert pianist Javier Cendejas will perform a benefit concert at 7:30 p.m. at the historic Tabor Opera for the Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue.

While Cendejas makes his present home in Kentucky, his accomplishments as a pianist are internationally renown. If you enjoy classical music, you are familar with the name Javier Cendejas. And if the renderings of Ludwig van Beethoven’s Arabesque in C Major, Op. 18 by Robert Schumann, and Piano Sonata No. 14 in C# minor, are to your musical taste, then don’t miss this special performance. For Cendejas’ full biography see below.

Now semi-retired, Cendejas is presenting this benefit concert to share his love for music and to support Leadville friend, Fire Chief Dan Dailey.

Concert Pianist Javier Cendejas will - no doubt - be playing to a full house at the July 31 Tabor Opera House concert to benefit the local fire department.

Concert Pianist Javier Cendejas will – no doubt – be playing to a full house at the July 31 Tabor Opera House concert to benefit the local fire department.

“I have known Javier for almost a decade now,” explains Chief Dailey. “He has become a good family friend,” often visiting with the Dailey family during his training runs, and races.

And yes, that’s where the trail part of the story comes into the picture. Cendejas will be attempting his tenth Leadville Trail 100 Run on August 16 -17.

“Unfortunately, I haven’t finished it,” says Cendejas quietly, as he plays the piano during the publicity photo shoot at the opera house. So will his tenth attempt seal the deal with a famous LT100 Belt Buckle?

“Who knows? We’ll see! I just like coming here and running. I just have fun,” he joked.

In fact, it was during one of his recent “fun” running visits, over lunch with Chief Dailey, when Cendejas offered to do a benefit concert for the fire department. From there, things came together quickly, and the benefit efforts to purchase a new fire engine were underway. Of course, it’s just the beginning of securing funds for new equipment, but any time the burden can be taken off the taxpayers, it’s a good thing, recognized Chief Dailey.

This could very well be the last summer of performances at Leadville's Historic Tabor Opera House.

This could very well be the last summer of performances at Leadville’s Historic Tabor Opera House.

Of course, the concert’s venue and instrument should also be noted. If you have not attended a performance at the historic Tabor Opera House, or it’s been a while, DON’T WAIT! Owners Bill and Sharon Bland recently announced that this will be their last summer. Of course, the opera house remains on the market and they are still hopeful that the right buyers come along, but for now, this could be the swan song summer.

As for the piano that Cendejas will be playing, it’s pretty special. The Knabe Grand Piano which was originally purchased for the opera house by Horace Tabor, was recently returned to its rightful home through a donation of the most recent owners. It’s a one-of-a-kind and its sound throughout the opera house is nearly pure!

But this won’t necessarily be the first time Cendejas will be playing this Knabe. In fact, he has often been found “keeping his fingers in shape,” and thrilling afternoon tour visitors to the opera house.

Tickets for the July 31 benefit concert are $15/per person or 2 for $25 and can be purchased at the Leadville fire house on the corner of 9th and Harrison Ave. or at the Tabor Opera House. Tickets will also be available at the door the night of the performance.

More About Javier Cendejas

According to online biographies, Cendejas was born in Uruapan, Michoacán, Mexico. Before coming to the United States, he studied at the National Conservatory in Mexico City. His initial studies in the U.S. were with Angelica Morales von Sauer, at the University of Kansas.

His career and continuing studies took him to New York City, where he studied with Dora Zazlavsky at the Manhattan School of Music. He completed his Bachelor of Music Degree at The Juilliard School, as a scholarship student of Adele Marcus and Jacob Lateiner.

While living in New York, he served as both performance and rehearsal pianist with New York’s Joffrey Ballet Company, and participated in both capacities on several national tours with The Joffrey II ensemble.

Concert Pianist Javier Cendejas

Concert Pianist Javier Cendejas

After moving to Louisville, KY with his wife, Nancy, he worked with The Kentucky Opera Association, and served as a pianist in the Affiliate Artist program, traveling throughout Kentucky.

Javier continued his formal studies, earning a Master of Music Degree from the University of Louisville. His formal studies were completed earning a Doctor of Music Degree at Indiana University, where his major field of study was piano performance. He also served as a graduate assistant/opera coach to Indiana’s opera department. In 1976, he began 20 year association with the Aspen Music Festival in Aspen, Colorado, serving as staff accompanist, opera coach.

Javier’s career as a performer includes numerous performances, with orchestras and as a recitalist, in Mexico, as well as in USA. He has performed with orchestras in Morelia Michoacán, in Monterrey Nuevo Leon and in Mexico City where he performed Rachmaninof’s First Piano Concerto which was nationally televised. He has participated in Piano Festivals in Monterrey and in the city of Querétaro.

Javier Cendejas will attempt his tenth Leadville Trail 100 next month. Buena Suerte! Photo: Javier Cendejas Facebook Page.

Javier Cendejas will attempt his tenth Leadville Trail 100 “Race Across The Sky ” next month. Buena Suerte! Photo: Javier Cendejas Facebook Page.

 

Lupine, Columbines, Trumpets – It’s Wildflower Season!

It’s hard not to notice them. They seem to be everywhere, more vibrant and plentiful than in recent years. It’s wildflower season in the high country!WildlfowersInBloom copy

And you don’t need to go very far to see all the color and variety. A simple walk along the Mineral Belt Trail or the Nature Trail out at the Leadville National Fish Hatchery should provide plenty of good viewing.

The recent rain, combined with the warmer temperatures predicted for this weekend, should make this peak season for blooms in Mother Nature’s high alpine garden. So make sure you take some time to stop and smell the (wild) roses!

Publisher’s Note: Please do not pick or use (medicinally) any wildflowers without knowing what you’re doing. The following is merely informational, not instructional. Don’t let the altitude clear your mind of good, old common sense!

Here are some of the beauties currently in bloom.

The Columbine: These majestic beauties are Colorado’s state flower and known for their purple spurred petals. In fact, it’s the shape of those petals that give this flower its name. The word “columbine” comes from the Latin for “dove,” due to the resemblance of the inverted flower to five doves clustered together.

The Columbine

The Columbine

The Lupine: This flowering plant is from the legume family, as in bean! Lupines are high in protein, dietary fibre and antioxidants, very low in starch, and, like all legumes, are gluten-free. Lupines can be used to make a variety of foods both sweet and savoury including everyday meals, traditional fermented foods, baked foods and sauces. The legume seeds of lupins, commonly called lupin beans, were popular with the Romans, who cultivated the plants throughout the Roman Empire; hence, common names like lupini in Romance languages.

The Lupine

The Lupine

The Purple Alpine Aster: Aster alpinus (Alpine Aster) is the only species of Aster that grows natively in North America; it is found in mountains. And here’s an interesting fact: The Hungarian Revolution of 1918, became known as the “Aster Revolution” due to protesters in Budapest wearing this flower.

The Purple Aster

The Purple Aster

The Fairy Slipper: This Calypso Orchid, also known as the Fairy Slipper or Venus’s slipper, is a perennial member of the orchid family. It has a small pinkish-purple flower accented with a white lip, darker purple spottings, and yellow beard.

These little purple blooms can be a pleasant sporadic sight on hiking trails like the one along Busk Creek, out by Turquoise Lake. The plants live no more than five years, and they are classified as threatened or endangered. The Fairy Slipper relies on “pollination by deception”, as it attracts insects to anther-like yellow hairs, but produces no nectar that would nourish them. Insects quickly learn not to revisit it.

The Fairy Slipper

The Fairy Slipper

Indian Paintbrush: This plant got its name from a Native American legend. In the legend, a young Indian wanted to paint the sunset, but became frustrated because he could not produce any colors that matched the beauty of a sunset.

He asked the Great Spirit for help. The Great Spirit provided him with paintbrushes with the beautiful colors on them which he used to create his painting. When he was done, the young Indian left his used paintbrushes scattered around the landscape. These paint brushes blossomed into plants and were thus named Indian Paintbrushs.

American Indians also used this plant for various purposes including as a hair wash, to enhance their immune system, as a treatment for rheumatism, and to treat sexually transmitted diseases.

Did you know that The Indian Paintbrush is Wyoming’s state flower?

The Indian Paintbrush

The Indian Paintbrush

Fairy Trumpet: Also known as a Skyrocket, or Rocket flower. It blooms throughout the summer, and is a favorite of hummingbirds and hawk moths. The petals are fused into a trumpet-shape with a long narrow tube and spreading lobes.

Medicinally, this plant has been reported to be boiled up as a tea, and heals everything from blood diseases to rheumatic joints. An infusion of the roots is also used as a laxative and in the treatment of high fevers, colds.

The Fairy Trumpet

The Fairy Trumpet

Leafy Cinquefoil: Also known as Biscuits, Five-fingers, and Flesh and Blood. Known as a real creeper, the stem runners of this perennial herb can often reach up to five feet in length.

That said, the herb is a rather pretty and dainty species of plant. The name of the cinquefoil is after an Old French word that means “five-leaf.” The five leaflets of the cinquefoil was a symbol for the five senses of the human body, and served as a motif for the Medivial man who had achieved mastery over the self. Have you ever noticed the cinquefoil’s five-fingered leaf symbol on a knight’s shield? The right to use this heraldic device could only be granted to knights who gained mastery over the self.

The cinquefoil was also linked to many other powers in superstitious medieval times, for example, the herb was supposed to scare off witches. Medieval lovers often used the cinquefoil in preparing love potions and as an instrument in romantic divinations. Medieval fishermen often fixed the herb to their nets to increase their catch of fish.

Herbalists through the ages have been familiar with the cinquefoil as a remedy to reduce a fever. It is also used as an herbal analgesic for alleviating the pain of a toothache and in a gargle for treating oral sores.

The Leafy Cinquefoil

The Leafy Cinquefoil

Yarrow: This aromatic perennial with its lovely, fern-like foliage is also called “thousand leaves,” because of its finely-divided leaves.

Introduced to North America by early colonists, yarrow soon became a valued remedy used by many tribes of indigenous people. Human relationships with this healing plant reach back to ancient times. The fossilized pollen of yarrow has been found in Neanderthal burial caves from as far back as 60,000 years.

Yarrow

Yarrow

Yarrow has also been associated with magic and divination, and is considered by some folk herbalists as a sacred plant with special spiritual powers to offer protection. The herb was also believed to be useful in love potions.

Yarrow accompanied soldiers into battle and was relied upon for its hemostatic action to treat wounds. Achilles, the Greek hero is said to have used yarrow in the Trojan War to staunch the blood flowing from the wounds of fallen comrades.

And for all you follicly challenged, infusions of yarrow have been used as a hair rinse in attempts to prevent baldness.

So there you have it – those are just some of the alpine beauties you can see in bloom this time of year! Colorado’s alpine meadows are home to some of the country’s most vibrant and colorful collections of wildflowers. And in Lake County, you don’t have to go very far to see any and all of them!

10th Mountain Huts Need Volunteers for Work Sessions

The 10th Mountain Division Hut Association is looking for volunteers for some upcoming work sessions on huts that are close-by Leadville and Lake County. It’s good, hard work in the spectacular outdoors for a great cause. And if that isn’t motivation enough, for each day worked, 10th Mountain will reward each volunteer with a free hut night (valid for 1 year). That’s quite an incentive for these popular huts!

Volunteers for the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association hard at work . . . and fun! Photo: 10 Mtn. Huts

Volunteers for the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association hard at work . . . and fun! Photo: 10 Mtn. Huts

The upcoming dates when volunteers are needed:

  • July 25, 26, 27 at the Betty Bear Hut – LINK for location.
  • August 4, 5, 6 at the Harry Gates Hut – LINK for location

Call at 970-925-5775 to sign-up.

1st morning of the Trooper Traverse, winter 1944-- the 10th soldiers stayed in this cabin. The first 10th Mountain Division Hut! Sadly, this cabin burned down in 2004. (© Erling Omland collection)

1st morning of the Trooper Traverse, winter 1944– the 10th soldiers stayed in this cabin. The first 10th Mountain Division Hut! Sadly, this cabin burned down in 2004. (© Erling Omland collection)

From the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association website:

Note to hut users interested in volunteering: Each year, 10th Mountain has a few returning volunteer groups that are assigned an entire volunteer period before the May 1st volunteer call-in. In the past, these groups have included a 10th Mountain Division veterans group and various youth groups. We appreciate the support and dedication of all volunteers, and regret any inconvenience caused by this lack of availability. Of course, if you wish to volunteer, but the scheduled volunteer periods don’t fit your schedule, there are additional volunteer opportunities available to either individuals or groups. Please contact 10th Mountain for more information or to schedule your volunteer period.

Work includes: processing 8 cords of wood (chain-sawing, splitting and stacking), painting, refurbishing stoves, cleaning, re-vegetation, trail work, etc.

Volunteers for the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association get ready to get to work on cabin maintenance. Photo: 10th Mtn Huts

Volunteers for the 10th Mountain Division Hut Association get ready to get to work on cabin maintenance. Photo: 10th Mtn Huts

You will need to bring a pair of work gloves, a sleeping bag if you are staying overnight, and meals for the length of your stay. 10th Mountain provides light snacks and soft drinks. After work, roughly 4-5pm, we generally go for hikes or enjoy a post work mountain bike ride, so bring your bike if you like riding. As on regular hut trips, dogs are not permitted.

We encourage as many people as possible to hike or bike up to the huts for the work weekends. If you do drive, a high clearance, four wheel drive vehicle is strongly recommended. Jackal, 10th Mountain and the Benedict huts have very steep, rocky, extreme four wheel drive roads. The roads to Uncle Bud’s, Fowler-Hilliard, Skinner, Benedict and Betty Bear are bumpy, steep in places, wash-boarded, and may require four wheel drive . Gates, Estin, and Eiseman huts can usually be reached without a four wheel drive vehicle, unless the roads are wet, in which case the roads can be extremely slippery and four wheel drive and chains may be required.

Please sign up only if you are committed to working. Our volunteer coordinators will contact you a few days before the weekend you have signed up for, to get an idea about when you will be arriving and to answer any last minute questions.

Again, if you are interested in working but the above dates don’t work for you or are already filled, please ask to be put on our list of “Other Interested Volunteers.” We often need volunteers for special projects and welcome your assistance.

Work will include stacking wood and cleaning the hut to get ready for the upcoming winter season. Please bring: Water, lunch, work clothes and gloves, rain jacket, sunscreen, insect repellent, and personal items if you plan on staying the night. You will be on your own for dinner. Each person who volunteers will earn a free night in the Hutmasters Quarters at a Summit Huts Hut. (Janet’s Cabin, Francie’s Cabin or Section House).

 

Several Bear Sightings Reported in Lake County

There have been several bear sightings in the area. This photo by Marcee Lundeen was taken at her home in Beaver Lake Estates. Lundeen reported via the Leadville Today Facebook Page: This is "Cupcake" (named for the story of the Alaskan bear that fell through a skylight and ate a child's birthday cupcakes), he's been a little naughty and a trapper showed up yesterday (Tues) at Beaver Lakes Estates to catch and relocate him.

There have been several bear sightings in the area. This photo by Marcee Lundeen was taken at her home in Beaver Lake Estates. Lundeen reported via the Leadville Today Facebook Page: This is “Cupcake” (named for the story of the Alaskan bear that fell through a skylight and ate a child’s birthday cupcakes), he’s been a little naughty & a trapper showed up yesterday at Beaver Lakes Estates to catch and relocate him.

 

This bear was found trying to get into some trash up at Brooklyn Heights, the subdivision located east above the ALCO Store. Photographer Dawn Flores wrote: "Nate just opened the garage door from the house to this face. .and literally could of touched his face. .got into all my trash, dragged a bag out into the woods. He was huge!

This bear was found trying to get into some trash up at Brooklyn Heights, the subdivision located east above the ALCO Store. Dawn Flores wrote: “Nate just opened the garage door from the house to this face & literally could of touched his face, got into all my trash, dragged a bag out into the woods. He was huge!

Obit_Spacer_Thin


Leadville’s Hoop Forest: A Magical Mystery!

By Kathy Bedell, © Leadville Today

Look, up in the sky! Look, there, in those tree branches. What are those? And how did they get way up there?!

A lodgepole pine's top branches play host to old barrel hoops.

A lodgepole pine’s top branches play host to old barrel hoops in Leadville.

Welcome to Leadville’s mystical Hoop Forest. Located just outside the city limits, this portion of the woods, where barrel rings seem to perform a high trapeze act among the lodge pole branches, has fondly been re-named the “Hoop Forest.”

It may not be a tourist attraction that many residents would share with a visiting hiker, however Leadville Today went out to investigate this unique, little-known place in the forest.

Wooden barrels transported numerous goods in and out of Leadville by rail.

Wooden barrels transported numerous goods in and out of Leadville by rail.

Back in the day, before ground transportation and overnight delivery, things were primarily transported to Leadville by rail. In fact, it was freight, not passengers, that made Leadville railroads profitable. And a lot of that freight was transported in wooden barrels.

These watertight, keg-shaped containers were able to withstand the stress of traveling across country by rail and could be easily rolled and stacked with little friction, once they reached their final destination.

Often times, folks think whisky or wine when it comes to these wooden barrels. But, all sorts of foods and goods were stored and transported in these containers. Fish, meats, and some vegetables were dried, salted, then stored and transported. Fragile items such as eggs would be packed in them, among layers of straw to keep them cooler and in one piece.

They were also good at keeping out the vermin. Which was important, because these containers were often buried in the ground, acting as refrigeration units. The barrels were often “re-purposed,” cut in half to serve as a cradle for a child, to water livestock, or as a large mixing bowl. No doubt, it was a barrel bonanza, back in the day.

Hoops_In_Tree

But once a barrel had seen its last ride down the rails, and was no longer of use as a storage container, it was most likely taken apart, with any salvageable wood used for cooking or heating.

But what about those hoops, the rings that held the wood together? Many old barrel rings were left behind in stacks, piled high around what was then a fledgling lodge pole pine. It’s these series of trees huddled together in a small patch of woods on the edge of town, that make up Leadville’s mystical Hoop Forest.

Way up in the branches of 50-60 ft lodge pole pines are nearly 100 (and counting) old barrel hoops, clinging and swinging as if performing some elaborate trapeze act. The rusty circular fasteners seem to blend into the dark branches of the pines. Others sit at the base of a centurion tree, as if its trunk simply stepped into the center of the hoop just yesterday.

So how did those hoops get way up into the trees? And what about the ones lying on the forest floor encircling the trunk of a 60 foot pine tree?

A young lodgepole pine grows tall with a hoop encircling its trunk.

A young lodge pole pine grows tall with a hoop encircling its trunk.

Like most mysteries, there are a few theories. The first has a lot to do with location. The Hoop Forest sits on the edge of town, not too far from an old train stop where the barrels came off freight cars by the hundreds. Many of these barrels were unloaded right there at the scene. The goods unpacked from the barrels were then placed onto the shopkeeper’s wagon and transported into Leadville.

Like any shipping and receiving center, that part of the forest also became a “dump” for the containers of the day: wooden barrels with hoops. The good barrels were re-used; the broken containers, left to sit and rot in the woods.

Another theory is that the site is an old whiskey or brew operation. That would account for the sheer number of hoops still hanging in the trees, as it’s hard not to image there were hundreds, if not thousands, stored there at some point. Either guess is as good as the next, because it’s really the “how” they got up there – some nearly 50 feet off the ground – that begs the question.

When you look up, way up into the tree tops and see the old rusty hoops, entangled in the centurion’s branches, you can imagine their journey. They started out resting on a low branch, and begin being lifted up, up, up by the growing tree, foot by foot, reaching higher, ever higher into the sky, year after year.

You can imagine their long, cold winters, blowing about in the freezing weather. How many hoops started out on the journey? How many made it through the winter, still intact in the boughs of those evergreens come springtime?

Clearly, the hoop remnants on the forest floor indicate that some may have fallen from the tree along the way, or perhaps, never got to take the journey in the first place. But the hoops that survived, the ones that remain in the treetops, are just one more reminder of Leadville’s history and the folks who made it! Are YOU tough enough to hang?

All things considered, there’s really no better place for the Hoop Forest than Leadville! Maybe you’ll be lucky enough to come across it one day.

Writer’s Note: Where is the Hoop Forest? Well, if you don’t know, I can’t tell you; I’ve been sworn to secrecy. Some locals may be familiar with where this unique forest feature lives, but for the others, the only clue I can offer, is a quick video shot which may offer a hint – if you’re good at scenic bearings!

If you have an interesting story for Leadville Today, please contact us at: info@leadvilletoday.com.

Leadville’s Magical Hoop Forest

 

All Aboard for Wild Flowers, Wildlife and a Flash Mob?

A choo-choo and some BBQ! Now what can beat that?!

BBQ_Views

Riders aboard the Leadville Train enjoy some award-winning BBQ. Photo: Leadville Today

Sure there’s the award winning BBQ from Del Anderson of Breckenridge, Colo. And you really can’t beat the views from the Leadville, Colorado & Southern Railroad (LCSR) as it travels up the Arkansas River Valley through lush aspen and lodge pole pine forest. But this year, the Annual BBQ Train ride might be remembered for what happened at the very end of the trip.

Maybe it was the tang from the BBQ sauce, or perhaps the bit of wine with dinner, but just as the train was pulling back into the station, as the sun was setting over the two highest peaks in the state, a flash mob broke out.

Yes, complete strangers from Tennessee, Arkansas, and Kansas, heard the call of the dance craze “The Cupid Shuffle” over the train’s intercom system, and jumped up, joining the train staff in a memorable, spontaneous performance.

Riding & Zipling: A Great Package Deal!

Riding & Ziplining: A Great Package Deal!

That’s just one of the things you might experience riding the Leadville train. Now in its 26th year, the railroad is offering some incredible package deals, many still left in the season. In fact, their zip and ride package has become one of their most popular ever, according to LCSR Marketing Director Kirstin Ayers. In the morning your group will ride the train up high above the valley floor, letting you off at the Top of The Rockies Zipline crossing where you’ll be picked up and taken zip your way through the San Isabel National Forest down to base camp. This four hour tour is perfect for adults and children giving them an opportunity to see untouched wilderness and is available throughout the train season website.

If an evening dinner and train ride sounds more your pace, then there’s still time to take advantage of the LCSR two new Stork Curve-Climax Specials including a light supper as the train goes to “the end of the line.” These will be 3 and 1/2 hour trips travel over the Arkansas River at its headwaters and see the beauty of the sunset in August. Take your pick of dates: Aug. 22 or Sept. 5, but do it quick as these tours are likely to sell-out. The train departs at 4:30 p.m. Cost: $55 for adult and $25 for children.

This time of year, the majestic mountain views from the train compete with what’s happening on the valley floor – wildflowers! And here’s your chance to see it on The Wild Flower Special train rides, but act quickly, as one of the tours is already sold out! There is still room on July 19 at 10 a.m. and on the Aug. 2, 10 a.m. ride.FB_Flowers

See the alpine flowers at their peak, splashing the mountain world with vibrant color! Riders on this special train will join the LCSR’s experienced tour guides for a 20 minute hike through pine forests, aspen groves and open meadows. View a multitude of varieties of wildflowers at the water tower. Some flowers sighted include Indian Paintbrush, Lupine and wild strawberries. You may find anything from our “local” deer to a mushroom in a wet marsh. Remember hiking shoes, a water bottle and camera. This hike is for people of all capabilities and interests please call for more information: 1-866-386-3936.

And why no extend your day’s experience and add-on the Healy House Museum Tour! After the railroad wildflower tour, enjoy a catered box lunch on the lawn at the Healy House Museum in downtown Leadville, where you will also have time to enjoy a stroll through the unique heritage gardens. The gazebo frames the view of Colorado’s highest mountains, Mount Elbert and Mount Massive. The lawn is a good place to view Harrison Avenue and you can see why August Meyer chose the “capital hill” area for his home. Following lunch there will be a private guided tour of both the Healy house Museum and James Dexter’s cabin. Add-on cost is $20 per person and reservations are required.

The Wild Flower Train tour is $52 per adult and $26 per child; add-on the Healy House Lunch and Tour for an additional $20 per adult and $15 per child (under 12)

And if taking pictures is more your thing, then you don’t want to miss The Photo Special Train Rides which take advantage of Colorado’s autumn beauty! This tour goes all the way, an additional mile and a half, allowing you to see the full beauty of the Arkansas River Valley and will take 3 hours. Bring your camera and your jacket! And the best part? The cost s only the normal rate to ride the train! So grab your camera and other photography-loving friends and pick your date: Sept. 13, 14, 20, 21, 27 and 28 with two different departure times of 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.

So take your pick, but whatever you do, don’t let summer go by without heeding the call for All Aboard!

The beauty of autumn, seen from the Leadville, Colorado and Southern Railroad.

The beauty of autumn, seen from the Leadville, Colorado and Southern Railroad. Photo: Leadville Today

 

It was a Grand Olde Time, A Glorious Time!

It was an action-packed Fourth of July weekend in Leadville. From foot races, to fireworks and markets to marches with nearly perfect weather to match! When it comes to 2-mile-high Independence Day Celebrations, this was one to remember.

Racers take their mark for the Firecracker 5k at the corner of 5th And Harrison. Proceeds from the race benefit the Leadville/Lake County Sports Hall of Fame.

Racers take their mark for the Firecracker 5k at the corner of 5th And Harrison. Proceeds from the race benefit the Leadville/Lake County Sports Hall of Fame.

Friday, July 4th kicked off with the Firecracker 5k, attracting about 150 runners for a fun, festive race through the west side of town. This year’s male and female winners had an interesting connection, as Logan Goodwich, 20 and his mother Elizabeth Goodwich, 56, both of Louisville, took first place in the male and female divisions.

A Mother and Cjild Reunion. . .at the finisher line. Logan Goodwich (left) wins the Firecracker 5k with a time of 17:57and poses with his mother (right) Elizabeth Goodwich, who took top honors for women.

A Mother and Child Reunion, at the finisher line. Logan Goodwich (left) wins the Firecracker 5k with a time of 17:57, poses with his mother (right) Elizabeth Goodwich, the top woman finisher.

“I’ve never won anything,” said mom Goodwich as she posed proudly with her son, who took top honors overall with a time of 17:58.

Filling out the podium were two Leadville residents: in second was Dustin Moore, 27, and Charles Bedfore in third place. The race is a fundraiser for the Leadville/Lake County Sports Hall of Fame.

Right after the race, people headed downtown like it was Boom Days! All to watch the Annual Fourth of July Parade sponsored by the Leadville/Lake County Chamber of Commerce. It was a sea of red, white and blue as businesses, events, and of course, local politicians marched down historic Harrison Avenue.

The Leadville Fourth of July Parade brought big crowds down to Harrison Avenue.

The Leadville Fourth of July Parade brought big crowds down to Harrison Avenue.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

The Leadville Elks Lodge #236 Color Guard led the way!

The Leadville Elks Lodge #236 Color Guard led the way!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

It wouldn't be a Leadville Fourth of July Parade without the Leadville Lion - ROAR!

It wouldn’t be a Leadville Fourth of July Parade without the Leadville Lion – ROAR!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Ye Olde Flea at Healy gave things a Victorian flare while advertising Saturday's market at the Healy House Musuem.

“Ye Olde Flea at Healy” gave things a Victorian flare while advertising Saturday’s market at the Healy House Museum. Looking Good, Ladies!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

The St. Vincent Hospital crew marched in full force, complete with ambulance and the new long-term care van recently purchased through charitable donations.

The St. Vincent Hospital crew marched in full force, complete with ambulance and the new long-term care van recently purchased through charitable donations.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

This pace car Corvette is its own piece of art, set against the new piece of art, a mural recently painted on the front of the old Sayer & McKee building (background).

This Corvette pace car was its own piece of art, set against the new piece of art, a mural recently painted on the front of the old Sayer & McKee building (background).

Obit_Spacer_Thin

The Leadville Race Series Crew marches their banner down the street, as runners and cyclists circle them in support.

The Leadville Race Series Crew marches their banner down the street, as runners and cyclists circle them in support.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

The Boom Days Parade will be next, and if the crowds for this July 4th parade are any indication, better plan to reserve a spot early!

The Boom Days Parade will be next, and if the crowds for this July 4th parade are any indication, better plan to reserve a viewing spot early!

Independence Day ended with another spectacular fireworks display put on by the Leadville Lions Club. The Tony Hren Memorial Fireworks show is one of the group’s many summer events. This pyrotechnic show is sponsored in part by a generous memorial donation from Hren, who was also a former owner of the Sayer & McKee drugstore. And it seems that Hren’s former business, is putting on a colorful display of its own, as Leadville artist BA Dallas completed his mountain-inspired mural on the boards in front of the collapsed building (see photo above).

Summer is definitely underway in the high country – get out there and enjoy it!

Making Leadville Sparkle! The Tony Hren Memorial Fireworks Display brought to you by the Lions Club. Photo: The Grill Bar & Cafe.

Making Leadville Sparkle! The Tony Hren Memorial Fireworks Display brought to you by the Lions Club. Photo at and by: The Grill Bar & Cafe.


Last “Rocky Mountain High” at Opera House?

When Chris Collins showed up at the historic Tabor Opera House (TOH) last week, to touch base about tonight’s show, volunteer Sally did a double take and thought she was seeing a ghost, wrote owner Sharon Bland on the TOH Facebook Page.

And if that’s the case for the artist, then Leadville can only hope to return the favor by showing off how glorious “Rocky Mountain High” summers can be. Collins and the Boulder Canyon Band won’t have to look very far off historic Harrison Avenue for inspiration to sing Denver’s poetic lyrics about natural beauty and how it helps transcend the human condition.

So if you’re a fan, the show starts tonight at 7:30 p.m. General Admission Tickets are $20.

Oh, and there’s one more reason you may want to catch this show – or some other event at the opera house this summer. Recently, owners Bill and Sharon Bland went “on the record” concerning the Tabor’s future. While they are still hopeful that they will find the right owner for the historic venue, “this will be our last summer,” said Bill Bland at a recent volunteer dinner. So, if you’ve been putting off seeing a show at this incredible Leadville gem, time’s a wastin!

Video of Chris Collins Singing Denver’s Sunshine on My Shoulder

 

Community Market Continues Saturdays Thru Sept. 6

Also tomorrow, the Leadville Community Market continues from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. in the First Mountain Bank parking lot in downtown Leadville. Logo Community MarketThis weekly market will be held every Saturday thru Sept. 6 and features goods and services from local residents and companies. Included among them are Leadville’s “secret” gardeners and bakers, goodies from the Daring Chocolate and locally made Purdy Yummy Soaps.

They are also providing a Kids’/Young Entrepreneurs’ table. In fact, local youth Sam Frykholm, a 12-year-old crepe-maker was recently featured on 9News. Other money-making projects included Allie Collin’s Lemonade stand.

So it’s off to the market you go! Grab the sunscreen and some cash, and go shopping . . . outside!Frykholm_9News_Click copy

 Obit_Spacer_Thin

It’s Time to Sparkle Red, White & Blue, Leadville!

Happy Independence Day! Leadville will be celebrating the country’s 238th Birthday in its usual two-mile-high style!

Please note that there is one slight caveat, regarding the fireworks (see post below), otherwise, here’s the run down of events:

The antique fire truck is always a big hit in th eFourth of July Parade. And be sure to stop in the Fire House afterwards for their annual Ice Cream Social!

The antique fire truck is always a big hit in the Fourth of July Parade. Be sure to stop in the Fire House afterwards for their annual Ice Cream Social! Photo: Leadville Today

9 a.m. – Firecracker 5K

The Firecracker 5k - Family Fun for Everone!

The Firecracker 5k – Family Fun for Everyone!

This fun community event usually has folks dressed in their most patriotic attire as racers follow the course which does a small loop through town, ending where it begins at the Lake County courthouse.

Cost is $15. Race day registration on court house lawn from 7:30 til 8:45 a.m. Race start is 9 a.m.

Proceeds support nonprofit Leadville/Lake County Sports Hall of Fame.

10 a.m. – July 4th Parade.

Sponsored by the Leadville/Lake County Chamber of Commerce this old-fashioned parade will sparkle with hometown pride!

Line up begins at 9:30 at the top of capitol hill and the parade will proceed down Harrison Ave. at 10 a.m., with Leadville’s finest all decked out in their red, white & blue!

The Leadville Lion dons summertime apparel in the Fourth of July Parade.

The Leadville Lion dons summertime apparel in the Fourth of July Parade.

After Parade – FREE FOOD take your pick – or do BOTH!

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue will hold its annual Ice Cream Social at the fire house directly after the parade.

Meanwhile, across town up at the Leadville/ Lake County Airport, staff will also be serving up some hot dogs and hamburgers from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. No one should go hungry, take your pick!!

The kids love climbing up in the big fire engines, add some ice cream and, what a good time!

The kids love climbing up in the big fire engines, add some ice cream and what a good time! Photo: Leadville Today.

Silent Auction Fundraiser for Mural at Art Gallery

New this year, is the Leadville Arts Coalition and Leomyka Gallery’s Silent Auction to raise money for a new mural. Many local artists have donated artwork, jewelry, and ceramics for the silent auction, which will take place from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Light refreshments will be available from 2-6 p.m., just in case you didn’t get your fill from the other celebrations!

Local artist Lexie Palmore will paint this life-sized mural, celebrating Leadville Ski Joring. There will be a Silent Auction at the Leomyka Gallery on July 4th to raise funds for this art project, sponsored in part, by the Leadville Arts Coalition.

Local artist Lexie Palmore will paint this life-sized mural, celebrating Leadville Ski Joring. There will be a Silent Auction at the Leomyka Gallery on July 4th to raise funds for this art project, sponsored in part, by the Leadville Arts Coalition.

Legacy Quartet Performs at Historic Tabor Opera House

Strike up the band; well, make that a quartet! Regardless, The Legacy Quartet will have the crowd tapping their toes and clapping their hands as they perform at the historic Tabor Opera House on Friday, July 4th at 7:30 p.m.2014posterLegacy1

“The songs they sing come from the heart in a professional, but very enjoyable concert,” touts the opera house promotion. General admission: adults – 15, special family rate – 25.

Or better yet, make a night of it and add dinner, with the VIP package, including a delicious catered dinner, reserved seating, and a meet and greet with the performers. Price is $45 for adults, and $25 for children under 12. The historic Tabor Opera House is located at 308 Harrison Avenue in downtown Leadville.

Dusk – July 4th Fireworks

Fireworks_Ad copyThe Tony Hren Memorial Fireworks sponsored by the Leadville Lions Club will begin at dusk.

IMPORTANT: This year the Lions Club is asking the public to keep in mind that the high school is under construction and therefore parking in the area of the football field is limited. Plan ahead, and consider watching the show from a different vantage point, or make a night of it with green chili and margaritas on The Grill’s patio!

Obit_Spacer_Thin

 

Let’s Go Fly A Kite! Up Where the Air is Clear!

Go Fly a Kite!  Leadville photographer and bartender extraordinaire Miles Duthie captured this shot on his family’s “property south of town,” during a recent kite-flying session.

Go Fly a Kite!
Leadville photographer and bartender extraordinaire Miles Duthie captured this shot on his family’s “property south of town,” during a recent kite-flying session.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Theater and Music: A Leadville Friday Night!

One of the best things about summertime is all the great live entertainment! And tonight, Friday, June 27 is a great example of that.

Original Plays Performed by Local Actors – Tonight!

In the mood for some original, live FREE theater? Then head on over to St. George Church at 4th and Pine Streets. A local group of writers and thespians have come together to form “Leadville Theater.” Tonight (June 27) will be there first presentation, consisting of An Evening of Short Plays. The show starts at 7 p.m. and admission is FREE.VestigesSnowScentPoster

The first play, “Vestiges,” tells the story of lovers who are given one hour to finish a conversation left undone for 25 years. The work is written and directed by Leadville’s Carol Bellhouse and stars Laurel McHarge and Curtis Imrie.

The second play is “Snow Scent,” which tells the story of a man and woman who find a way to heal a wound from the past on a trip to the Colorado Rockies. This plays stars Donna Schaefer and Jeff Harlow and will be directed by Susan Fladager. This play was also written by Carol Bellhouse.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Live Music at The Scarlet in Downtown Lead Vegas!

After you’re done with your theater fix, head east towards historic Harrison Avenue and you’ll find some live music at The Scarlet on the corner of 4th & Harrison.Scarlet

Treat yourself tonight to some live Soul, Rhythm and Blues by Johnny Rawls. And it sounds like Rawls has the street cred to back up some good jams.

He began playing professionally while still in high school with such stars as ZZ Hill, Little Johnny Taylor, Joe Tex and the Sweet Inspirations. In the mid-70’s, Johnny went to work for OV Wright as Wright’s band director. After Wright’s death in 1980, Johnny led Little Johnny Taylor’s band until 1985, when he began touring as a solo artist and made his first solo recording under the Rainbow label.

And tonight, the legendary Johnny Rawls will find himself on the corner of 4th & Harrison in downtown Leadville. The show starts at 9:30 p.m. and there’s no cover. The performance will also feature Glen Sherill and members of local band Stonefed. Sounds like The Scarlet is where it is happening tonight in Lead Vegas!

Johnny Rawls Singing Some Down Home Rhythm and Blues:

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Visiting Groups to Clean Cemeteries, Summit Elbert

The summer season is in full swing, which mean lots of visitors, and taking the back streets through town to avoid all the additional traffic. But welcome one and all, especially those groups doing something extra special while they are here in Leadville and Lake County.

Annual Jewish Cemetery Clean Up This Weekend

Leadville is known for its cemeteries. People actually come to town specifically to spend time walking or driving through the Evergreen, Hebrew and St. Joseph Cemeteries.

Since 1995, volunteers with B’nai B’rith Denver have partnered with the Temple Israel Foundation in Leadville to annually clean and restore the cemetery after decades of neglect. Photo: B’nai B’rith Denver

Since 1995, volunteers with B’nai B’rith Denver have partnered with the Temple Israel Foundation in Leadville to annually clean and restore the cemetery after decades of neglect. Photo: B’nai B’rith Denver

This weekend will be no different. However, this group will also spend time cleaning up gravesides, as they’ve done every year since 1996. The 18th Annual Leadville Jewish Cemetery Cleanup project gets underway this weekend, June 27 – 29. Sponsored and B’nai B’rith Denver, the Young Leadership Network will be cleaning up on the grounds at Leadville’s Jewish Cemetery, located next to Evergreen Cemetery in Leadville.

Their weekend celebration will kick off Friday night, June 27 with a Kabbalat Shabbat and a kosher-style dairy pot luck at the Silver Dollar Campground at Turquoise Lake.

On Saturday, June 28 activities begin at 10 a.m. with a Shachrit service, followed by an oneg at Temple Israel (at the corner of 4th & Pine, 1 block west of Harrison Avenue). Rabbi Debra Rappaport, from B’nai Vail Congregation and Rabbi Eliot Baskin from Jewish Community Chaplaincy & Rafael Spiritual Healing Center of Jewish Family Service of Colorado will lead services.

During the early evening, the group will serve a non-dairy pot luck dinner and join the Community Meal at 5 p.m. served at St. George Episcopal Church (directly across the street from Temple Israel). Please bring canned goods to support the church’s ongoing meals program. A communal Havdalah Ceremony will follow the pot luck.

Donations to B’nai B’rith Denver to help cover the food and clean up expenses would be greatly appreciated. Jewsih_Cemetery CleanUp_woman

On Sunday, June 29, the muscle work begins with the annual clean up of the Leadville Hebrew Cemetery at 9 a.m. Free breakfast will be available for early volunteers. The group’s goal this year is the general clean up of the grounds, which will include cutting weeds, pruning tree branches, cemetery picket fence painting, and sprucing up soiled grave markers.

A graveside memorial service honoring those early Jewish pioneers buried in the Leadville Hebrew Cemetery will be conducted at 11 a.m. Each year the service is held around a different grave site that has been researched regarding the history of the deceased.

Following the memorial service, B’nai B’rith will provide a kosher lunch to thank all volunteers for their hard work and devotion to this annual mitzvah.

Clean up will continue throughout Sunday until approximately 4 p.m.

Starting in 1995, B’nai B’rith Denver has partnered with the Temple Israel Foundation to restore the cemetery after decades of neglect. The cemetery was re-consecrated in August 1999 and is currently accepting new interments. The partnership has remained and annual volunteer clean ups have been continued every summer.

Here’s a great video about the Leadville Jewish Cemetery Clean Up

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Reaching the Top of Elbert for Fallen Heroes!

Is summiting one of Colorado’s 14ers one of your summer goals? Well, consider joining Cops on Top for their Mt. Elbert ascent this Saturday, June 28 to honor of the law enforcement officers who have been killed in the line of duty. Every year on the last Saturday in June, Cops on Top teams from across the country set out to summit their state’s highest point. Last year, a team of 23 volunteers summited Mt. Elbert and they are looking for others interested in joining them this year.

Team Colorado for Cops on Top summited Mt. Elbert to honor fallen heroes last June. Will you join them this year?

Team Colorado for Cops on Top summited Mt. Elbert to honor fallen heroes last June. Will you join them this year?

Cops on Top has a mission of never forgetting the life, memory and sacrifice of our nation’s law enforcement officers who have been killed in the line of duty. Whether the team is attempting to climb the tallest mountain or hike the highest hill, each team member carries with them the memory of the tremendous sacrifice the officers made to protect and serve that State. Certainly something to remember with memorial Day just around the corner. Thank you to all law enforcement, but especially the Leadville/Lake County officers for keeping the community safe.

Governor’s Summer Job Hunt for Youth Underway

Ah, that summer job of your youth. What was yours? Cutting grass? Bussing tables at the local restaurant? Babysitting? No matter what it was, someone probably helped you get that job. And now Colorado’s Gov. John Hickenlooper can lend a hand as well.

Leadville youth work as servers for Manuelita's Restaurant during the recent Leadville Trail Marathon race.

Leadville youth work as servers for Manuelita’s Restaurant during the recent Leadville Trail Marathon race.

Each year, Colorado’s longest running and most successful youth employment program helps tens of thousands of young people prepare for the uncharted territory of a first summer job. Since 1981, the Governor’s Summer Job Hunt program has connected high school and college students with Colorado employers willing to give them a chance to learn, put skills to use and see firsthand how a business operates.

“The program has a proven track record,” says Department of Labor and Employment Executive Director Ellen Golombek. “The Governor’s Summer Job Hunt has assisted more than half a million teens in the last three decades and this summer, professionals at our Frisco Workforce Center are ready to work with another generation of young job seekers.

As much as it is an employment program, with a wealth of job openings geared toward youth, the Governor’s Summer Job Hunt is also a training program. Workforce Center staff know that getting a summer job takes initiative but getting the job is only half the story. There are a lot of things a young person needs to learn in order to be successful and the Leadville Workforce Center provides assistance in résumé writing, interviewing skills and job search strategies to help young people gain a competitive edge in their job hunt. The Workforce Center’s commitment is to teach the youngest job seekers how to be successful, how to establish a solid work ethic and how to build the groundwork to their future careers.

For young people who are comfortable in marketing themselves to employers or want to do a self-directed job search, Workforce Centers offer an online job bank called Connecting Colorado (www.connectingcolorado.com). Registration at the website is quick and easy to use and Connecting Colorado has a listing of job opportunities for all job seekers including those who are making their first foray into the job market.

For teens who would like some help in their job search and for employers who would like more information about the Governor’s Summer Job Hunt, the Leadville Workforce Center is located at 115 6th St and can be reached at 719-486-2428.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Tabor Grand Hotel Undergoes $7 Million Renovation

By Kathy Bedell © Leadville Today

“Wowser, looks like they’re serious this time!” That was one of the comments made when this picture of the Tabor Grand Hotel’s renovation project was posted on the Leadville Today Facebook page.

The historic Tabor Grand Hotel in downtown Leadville

The historic Tabor Grand Hotel in Leadville is undergoing a $7 million renovation.

Yes, they are serious. And while the Tabor Grand Hotel’s history is well-known, it’s present-day condition is even harder to miss, once you turn the corner onto Harrison Avenue. The scaffold-encased, historic beauty is undergoing a $7 million renovation. So, yes they are serious!

So who exactly are “they”? The Overland Property Group (OPG) out of Kansas City, Kan. bought the property in mid-Match of this year, after hearing that the historic gem was for sale, and in need of major renovation work.

“We came into the conversation in December of last year,” said Matt Gillam, OPG’s Vice President of Development. “But the opportunity to own and work on such a project was hard to pass up.”

And so far, most locals would agree that the new owners are the right people for the job.

By the late 1980s the building was showing signs of sure collapse. File Photo/Leadville Today

By the late 1980s the building was showing signs of sure collapse. File Photo/Leadville Today

The Tabor Grand’s last renovation was completed back in 1992. But for those who’ve been around long enough to remember, a lot of that work was a band-aid fix for what is considered to be one of Leadville’s crowning gems on historic Harrison Avenue.

And in recent years, the old gal was looking a bit worse for the wear, deteriorating one brick at a time, out onto the sidewalk at an ever-increasing rate, and danger to the public.

“Our intention is to thoughtfully preserve the building. To have the renovation done correctly,” stated Gillam, adding that this method would ensure another 50-70 years of life for the building.

A new roof with a view! Workers begin the prep work for installing a new roof on the Tabor Grand Hotel which first opened in 1885. Photo: OPG

A new roof with a view! Workers begin the prep work for installing a new roof on the Tabor Grand Hotel which first opened its doors in 1885. Photo: OPG

The plan is extensive and includes a complete interior and exterior renovation of the building, nuts to bolts. On the exterior, that will include installing a new roof, sealing the brick, restoring all of the unique cornices, and bringing all those windows back to their original state, including the old ropes used to open and close them. Unfortunately, not a lot of the window panes are original, so OPG is working with the historic commission and a specialized window refurbisher to get double paned, energy effiecient windows milled into the current shape. And yes, the “Baby Doe Box” window will remain!

All of the 37 residential units will be completely overhauled. Photo:OPG.

All of the 37 residential units will be completely overhauled. Interior work is underway! Photo:OPG.

On the interior, it’s a complete overhaul for the 37 residential, one and two bedroom units. At present, work is already underway on the 6 top floor units. This includes all new appliances, tile, cabinets, paint, all of it! The OPG kept tenants in mind when developing the plan. In fact, 31 of the 37 residential units are still occupied. The plan is that once the top floor units are complete, some of the tenants will move up to those units, vacating the next round of interior work for the apartments.

“We worked hard in not having to displace any tenants during renovation,” said Gillam. And the low-income housing qualifications will remain in place for residential tenants as well.

Downtown Leadville or NYC? Hard to tell, but everyone's OPEN FOR BUSINESS!

Downtown Leadville or NYC? Hard to tell, but everyone’s OPEN FOR BUSINESS!

So what about the street-level commercial tenants, who seem to be encased in scaffolding and signage these days?

“They all plan on staying on,” said Gillam. However, the renovation does not include the interior to commercial spaces, that’s up to each business, although several are considering a remodel.

Some of that interior commercial space will be the leasing office for Overland Property Group, including a new community lounge room.

“We are trying to make that space as historically relevant as possible, “explained Gillam. “We feel like we’re stewards to this building and want to remain true to the time period the building represents.”

One of the things that won’t be changing is the property managers, Terrence and Deb McNicholas. “They are great people, so we’re excited that they are going to stay on with us,” added Gillam.

So what’s the timeline from here? Obviously, weather is a primary concern. The roof is currently being replaced. Next is the brick and cornice work. The public can expect to see the scaffolding remain in place until Oct/Nov, or once the exterior work is complete.

TaborGrand_WebCamAnd remember, you can keep up with the progress yourself from OPG’s webcam, pointed directly at the Tabor Grand Hotel from the roof of the Manhattan Bar across the street.

It is actually two cameras, the live web cam and a time-lapse camera, which takes a picture of the project every 15 minutes. The end result will be one of those high-tech, time-lapse videos of construction from beginning to end. Leadville Today will bring that to readers when it’s available.

“Our goal is to be completely done by the end of this year,” concluded Gillam. “We want to make sure that the renovation that is done this time, preserves that building, which is such a dominate piece of history, not only for Leadville, but the entire state of Colorado. Once the project is complete, we believe, that it should win national awards and continue to be a pride for Leadville and Colorado.”

It’s good to know that historic Harrison Avenue will see one of its Grande Dames of architecture made over, just in time for her 130th Birthday. It’s time to party like it’s 1885!

Watch the progress - and Harrison Avenue activity - day or night from the web cam!

Watch the progress – and Harrison Avenue activity – day or night from the web cam!

Obit_Spacer_ThinUpcoming Leadville Events Put the “Fun” in Fundraising

It’s a good thing when you can get out and have some fun AND raise some money for local charities. So Leadville Today rounded up a list of some upcoming “fun”raisers. Take your pick, enjoy the summer, and thanks for helping raise some money for local non-profits!

All Aboard to Support Victims of Domestic Violence

The Grapes and Grains on Rails fundraiser for the Advocates of Lake County might be a new event, but no doubt it’ll coming round the mountain year after year. How can you go wrong when it’s good wine or beer and cruising on the Leadville train, taking in the evening sunset? This tour isn’t even offered at any other time. It’d be great to see it sell out! Here are the details.Grapes and Grains on Rails - LEGAL SIZE copy

Enjoy a selection of Colorado wines and beer from Crazy Mountain Brewing Company, and hors d’oeuvres while taking an evening ride on the Leadville, Colorado and Southern Railroad. Tickets are $40 for adults which includes 2 drink tickets and $30 for children under 10. Boarding starts at 5:30 p.m. and the train leaves at 6 p.m. Reservations required by June 23, 2014. Call (719) 486-3936 (Leadville, CO and Southern Railroad) or (719) 486-3530 (Advocates of Lake County) for tickets.

Proceeds benefit the Advocates of Lake County whose mission is to assist any victim of crime, violence or other traumatic event. The Advocates work for positive change, seeking to promote a safe and healthy community.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Hospital Foundation Golf Tournament Returns

The St. Vincent Hospital Foundation is bringing back its annual golf tournament fundraiser with the Thin Air Classic next Friday, June 20. The tournament will be run in a 4-player team Scramble format. You can put your own team together or get matched up with other players. Registration opens at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start at 9 a.m.thin_air_web

Entry Fee is $75 per person with golf cart – $50/pp without cart and includes a continental breakfast, BBQ lunch, snacks, awards and giveaways.

And while the “golf” is always good at America’s Highest, Mt. Massive Golf Course, the prizes for this tournament should draw in good participation. Every golfer gets a $10 Golfsmith gift card, a golf club certificate, and if you’re good enough to score a Hole In One (LOCALS!) there is a $10,000 cash prize Sharp LCD Flat-Screen TV, set of Calloway Irons, Roundtrip Domestic Airfare for 2.

Obit_Spacer_Thin Never Polka-ed in Leadville? Here’s Your Chance!

Strike Up the Band! The Knights of Columbus are sponsoring a Polka Dance on Saturday, June 28 from 7 – 11 p.m. The dance will be held at The Elks Lodge, 123 W. 5th Street in Leadville. Cost is $10 per person or $12 at the door. Advance tickets can be purchased from Knights members or at the Holy Family Parish office at 609 Poplar Street. Call 719-486-1382 for more information.

 

It’s Films, Fun and Friday Night Theater Try-outs!

Who needs an air-conditioned cinema when you have Ice Palace Park? Well, for now, as long as the weather holds, no one!

That’s right, the Community Movie Night series is back and they’re kicking off the season this Saturday, June 14, showing The Lomax in Ice Palace Park. Movies_June14 copyThis loveable Dr. Seuss book hits the big screen as the tale of a young boy who encounters a cantankerous forest creature after venturing outside of his artificial city in search of a tree.

The show starts at dusk, which is generally about 8:30 this time of year. The movie is FREE. Ice Palace Park is located north of the Mining Museum (E. 10th Street Entrance). And be sure to check out the “Get Outdoors Celebration” (story below) for a list of all the other activities happening all day, before the first film in the Community Movie Night series.

This series of movies is funded entirely with private donations from the community. Here’s a full line-up of this summer’s movies, as well as some information about how you can become a sponsor of this great community event: INFO.Obit_Spacer_Thin

It’s Summertime – Join the “Get Outdoors Celebration”

Saturday, June 14 should be an action packed day in Leadville, including the “Get Outdoors Celebration”.

Get Outdoors Celebration by Lake County Recreation this Saturday, June 14.

Get Outdoors Celebration by Lake County Recreation this Saturday, June 14.

This is the first year for this event sponsored by the Lake County Recreation Department. All of the action takes place at Ice Palace Park, located just north of the Mining Museum (E. 10th Street Entrance).

Starting at 12:30 there will be a variety of kids events held throughout the day until the movie at 8:30 p.m. Below is the schedule of FREE events for the entire family. All events will start or take place at Ice Palace Park.

  • 12:30p.m. – Bike Ride on the Mineral Belt Trail with Natalie LaVoie
  • 1 p.m. – Qui Gong with Diane Mrkvicka
  • 1:30 p.m. – Zumba with Jaden Skinner
  • 2:30 p.m. – Story Time with Anita Harvey from the Lake County Public Library
  • 3 p.m. – Kite Flying and Crafts with Felicia Roeder
  • 4 p.m. – Tag and Other Games with Sarah Wells
  • 5 p.m. – Free BBQ Dinner
  • 6:30 p.m. – Kickball
  • 7:30 p.m. – Music and time to relax
  • 8:30 p.m. Movie in the Park featuring The Lorax

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Kids Theater Program (and more) Returns to Leadville

Remember the theater programs for kids that Susan Fladager used to put on at St. George’s Church? It was back in the early 2000,. Well, good news, Susan is back in town and has teamed up with Leadvillite Carol Bellhouse to provide a bunch of Friday night events this summer. They will be mixing it up from poetry readings and slams, to reader’s theater and music. To kick if off, they’re having auditions for the theater portion tomorrow Friday, June 13.

Leadville Today #Throwback Thursday)Photo: A Classic from Susan Fladager: The Granny Awards, an original play performed at St. George’s. Recognize anyone you know?

Leadville Today #Throwback Thursday Photo: A Classic from Susan Fladager: The Granny Awards, an original play performed at St. George’s. See anyone you know?

Here’s the info:

Leadville Theater’s Summer of Fun will be held Friday, June 13 at 7 p.m. at St. George Church (W. 4th & Pine Streets). The try-outs are open to all ages (children and teens especially welcome), no experience necessary.

Reader’s Theater is minimal theater with no memorization, sets or costumes. Characterized as a joint dramatic reading, the time commitment required for rehearsals and performance will be under five hours. For information, call Carol Bellhouse at 719-486-1282 or Susan Fladager at 719-293-2287.

 

Celebrate the Red, White & Blue on Harrison Avenue!

Even though Flag Day isn’t officially until this Saturday, June 14, the replacement of a Harrison Ave. flag will hopefully inspire people to get out Old Glory and wave her proudly. It’s time to celebrate the red, white and blue!

Old Glory waves again over the Historic Tabor Opera House in Leadville.

Old Glory waves again over the Historic Tabor Opera House in Leadville.

Leadville Today readers may remember last September’s story (LINK) about the new flag hoisted up the 50 foot flag pole atop the Tabor Opera House in historic downtown Leadville. The new 10 x 15 foot banner was hard to miss and created a renewed sense of patriotism on main street.

A firefighter untangles the cable from the top of the Tabor Opera House flagpole. Photo: Glen Carter.

A Leadville/Lake County firefighter untangles the cable from high atop the Tabor Opera House flagpole. Photo: Glen Carter/Leadville Today.

Unfortunately, Old Glory met up with Old Man Winter this year, and the huge flag was a bit worse for the wear by spring.

“Sad news!” reported Tabor Opera House owner Sharon Bland on the venue’s Facebook page on April 28. “Our huge and beautiful flag fought through the winter, but March and April came in like a lion with winds that broke the cable.”

However, with feet of snow on the roof, it would be a while until the helpers were able to get to the pole for repairs. The flag had to be removed and replaced but first the tangled cable wire had to be straightened out.

Finally, last Saturday, June 7 a core group of citizens rallied once again and got the job done. And it was the Leadville/Lake County Fire Department to the rescue for the most delicate part of the task. The fire rescue team turned the repair into a training exercise, extending their ladder truck to its very end to reach the top of the flag pole.

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue crew assisted in getting Old Glory back on the flag pole atop the historic Tabor Opera House. Photo: Glen Carter/Leadville Today

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue crew assisted in getting Old Glory back on the flag pole atop the historic Tabor Opera House. Photo: Glen Carter/Leadville Today

“We couldn’t have done it without them,” explained Tabor Opera House owner Bill Bland. “No one else could have reached the top of the flag pole to get the cable untangled.”

Great job! The Thank You list also includes – among others – Leadville VFW Post No. 859 – who donated the flag, Donny and Deb Miller, Sharon and Bill Bland, Heather Kovalaski, Manager at True Value – who donated the new cable. and of course, the Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue. Three cheers for the red, white & blue!Obit_Spacer_Thin

Summertime Blooms: How Does Your Garden Grow?

They might be retired, but thy’re still growing things. Now it’s flowers instead of children’s minds! From left to right: Pat Stout, Judy and Don Fabian.

They might be retired, but thy’re still growing things. Now it’s flowers instead of children’s minds! From left to right: Pat Stout, Judy and Don Fabian.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

And Now that School is Out for the Summer . . .

Library Summer Reading Program June 17 – July 31

Readers of all ages will explore all things scientific this summer as Lake County Public Library presents “Fizz, Boom, Read” during its summer library program. Activities include science experiments, robot building, Grossology 101, nature exploration and more.

The Lake County Public Library Summer Reading Program soared to new heights in literacy winning the Judge's Choice Award for the Boom Days Parade 2010!

The Lake County Public Library Summer Reading Program soared to new heights in literacy winning the Judge’s Choice Award for the Boom Days Parade 2010!

The 2014 Summer Reading Program is open to young people, preschool through young adult, with programs, prizes, reading club, and more. The Summer Reading Program takes place Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and Thursdays from June 17 through July 31.

The reading group will also be participating in the Boom Days Parade on August 2. Registration for “Fizz, Boom, Read” begins on June 17. For more information, stop by the Library, or call (719) 486-0569. Download a brochure below, from the Library website, or pick up a paper copy at the library.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Four Weeks Until the Fourth – Join the Parade!

What are you doing four weeks from today? Well, if you’re typical patriotic Leadvillite, you’ll be celebrating the USA’s 238th Birthday! That’s right the Fourth of July is only four weeks away, so better start making your plans.

Come and join the parade!

Come and join the parade!

And if you’re smart enough to be staying in town and having friends and family come to Leadville, why not do it up right and march in the parade? Here are all the details from the chamber:

The Leadville/Lake County Chamber of Commerce is seeking any and all businesses, organizations, and community groups who would like to submit an entry in this year’s Fourth of July parade, to be held on Friday, July 4th at 10 a.m.

As our country celebrates its 238th birthday, Leadville will dress up in flags and patriotic colors and host a classic 4th of July parade straight down Harrison Avenue. If you or your organization is interested in joining this parade and celebration, contact the Chamber of Commerce to get signed up.

The parade will begin at 10 a.m. All entrants will be lined up by 9:30 a.m. in front of the National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum on 9th Street.

Immediately following the parade the Independence Day festivities will continue with various community BBQs and ice cream socials both here in town and out at the airport. The day’s public events will wrap up with one of the best high altitude fireworks displays in Colorado. Please contact the Chamber of Commerce at (719) 486-3900, email at leadville@leadvilleusa.com, or stop by the Visitor Center at 809 Harrison Avenue for more information or to get signed up for the parade!

The Elks Lodge leads last year's parade with the color guard down Harrison Avenue. Photo: Leadville Today.

The Elks Lodge leads last year’s parade with the color guard down Harrison Avenue. Photo: Leadville Today.

 

Leadville Business Celebrates 20 Years on the Avenue!

Melanzana_Celebration_20Years copy

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Mining Hall of Fame Inductees Announced

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum (NMHF&M) announced the 2014 inductees last week.

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Musuem.

The National Mining Hall of Fame and Museum.

Representing the domestic and worldwide metal production, education, and health and safety sectors of the industry, this year’s four inductees cover a diverse cross-section of the mining industry.

Harry M. Conger III, Günther Franz (Frank) Joklik, Ellen Swallow Richards, and Dr. Alfred Weiss will join 223 other mining industry pioneers at the 27th Annual Induction Banquet and Ceremony on September 13, 2014. They were selected for being visionaries, leaders, and ambassadors, both within their own sectors and across the industry at large.

2014 Inductees:

Harry M. Conger III Conger_NMHF_InducteeHarry M. Conger was a great role model and strong advocate within Homestake Mining Company and among his industry peers on behalf of environmentally responsible, safe, profitable, and high-performance operations. As Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Conger was instrumental in revitalizing and rebuilding Homestake into an industry leader in technological advances and environmental protection. Full Biography.

Günther Franz (Frank) Joklik Joklik_NMHF_InducteeThrough his contributions in exploration, project development and operations management as Kennecott President and Chief Executive, Günther Franz (Frank) Joklik did much to strengthen Kennecott as a company and assisted in restoring the competitiveness of the U.S. mining industry. Full Biography.

Ellen Swallow Richards Richards_NMHF_InducteeEllen Henrietta (Swallow) Richards is generally recognized as the woman who founded ecology. She was the very definition of a pioneer in such diverse fields as chemistry, geology and mineralogy, mining and metallurgy, environmental science, public health, home economics, and education. Full Biography.

Dr. Alfred Weiss Weiss_NMHF_InducteeDr. Alfred Weiss was a true visionary in using quantitative methods and digital computers to aid mineral exploration, plan and design mines, operate mineral production facilities, and integrate the disparate information resources throughout a mining company into a modern management information system. Full Biography.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

OldMooseLodge_Before_after copy

Obit_Spacer_ThinSew, A Needle Pulling Thread! Happy 20th Melly!

By Kendra Kurihara, Melanzana

Amazing! It’s been 20 years since Fritz Howard moved to Leadville with two sewing machines in the back of his two-wheel-drive Nissan pick up. He soon found an office upstairs in the Bank Annex building on East 5th Street.

A Cloud City Original: Melanzana

A Cloud City Original: Melanzana

 

We were called “Eggplant” back then, and there was no Polartec fleece to be seen anywhere. Our earliest products were GORE-TEX gaiters, overmitts and custom bibs for climbing and skiing. Since those dreamy days in 1994, Melanzana has slowly and cautiously evolved into a downtown Leadville institution.

On Saturday May 31 we will celebrate those 20 long years, and thank our local customers and downtown community for their support!Melanzana Logo

Join us between 11 a.m. and 3 p.m. for a community-wide downtown sidewalk sale (look for the balloons), free Lions Club hot dogs, groovy acoustic music by Local Honey, and a gigantic pile of half-price Micro Grid Hoodies.

Wear your oldest Melanzanas for the Vintage Melly Contest, take a factory tour, and check out our Melanzana History display. Cool! And THANK YOU to everyone that has ever supported us in any way, we could not have made it this far without Leadville’s wonderful community.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Local Memorial Day Services Well-Attended

Memorial Day Services were held at the Tenth Mountain Division Monument at Tennessee Pass and the Lake County Veterans Memorial on Memorial Day, May 26. Both services were well attended, with a standing room only crowd.

Tommy Thompson with the Tenth Mountain Division Foundation addresses the crowd on Memorial Day gathered at Tennessee Pass. The new Tenth Mtn information Kiosk stand in the foreground. Photo: Leadville Today.

Tommy Thompson with the Tenth Mountain Division Foundation addresses the crowd on Memorial Day gathered at Tennessee Pass. The new Tenth Mtn information kiosk stands in the foreground as a new addition to the monument. Photo: Leadville Today.

It was commemoration #55 of “Remembering Our Fallen Comrades” as Tommy Thompson with the Tenth Mountain Division Foundation directed the program as the Master of Ceremony. The keynote address was given by Lt. General Benjamin Freakley, a former Commanding General, 10th Mtn. Division. It was an all-round community event, including the Lake County High School Band playing some patriotic music under the direction of Jonathan Cole.

Director Jonathan Cole led the Lake County High School Band in the National Anthem at Memorial Day Services at the Tenth Mountain Division Monument. Photo: Leadville Today

Director Jon Cole led the Lake County High School Band in the National Anthem at Memorial Day services at the 10th Mountain Monument. Photo: Leadville Today

The ceremony also made note of the recent bill (HB-1089) signed into law by Governor John Hickenlooper in Leadville concerning the Tenth Mountain Division commemorative license plate (see story) . The ceremony was concluded with a 21-Round rifle salute and the retiring of colors. Visitors enjoyed a nice BBQ lunch at the Lodge at Ski Cooper afterward. It was a beautiful day for the service.

Rider from the 3rd Annual "Killed in Action Recognition Ride" pull into the Lake County Veterans Memorial. Photo: Leadville Today

Riders from the 3rd Annual “Killed in Action Recognition Ride” pull into the Lake County Veterans Memorial on Memorial Day May 26. Photo: Leadville Today

Just a couple hours later, a second ceremony in Lake County commemorating Fallen Heroes was taking place on Highway 91, and eventually at the Veteran Memorial at Evergreen Cemetery.

The 3rd Annual “Killed In Action Recognition Ride” along Fallen Heroes Memorial Highway (91) saw 26 riders this year. No doubt, the snow on Saturday and Sunday might have scared a few people away, however those that rode in honor of military killed in action were treated to an awesome bluebird Colorado day.

Elks Lodge Exalted Ruler John Christiansan (left) and Derek Olsen (right) lay a memorial wreath at a monument. Photo: Leadville Today.

Elks Lodge Exalted Ruler John Christiansan (left) and Derek Olsen (right) lay a memorial wreath at a monument. Photo: Leadville Today.

Motorcyclists rode into the Lake County Veterans Memorial joining a good crowd of community members for the official ceremony, emceed by Leadville Mayor Jaime Stuever. The program included speeches USMC Staff Sergeant Joshua M. Buck, Leadville Judge Neil Reynolds, and Justin Van Natta, who served with Nick Palmer in Iraq.

The new names etched on the Veterans Memorial were revealed and the Laying of the Wreaths by the Elks Lodge #236 and the Veterans of Foreign Wars 2 Mile High Post # 859, rounded out the service. There was a reception at the Elks Lodge after the ceremony.

Brad Palmer (left) and son Dustin (in Navy whites - right)  listen to a Memorial Day speech by John Christiansan during Monday's service. Nick Palmer's Fallen Soldier Battle Cross sits between his father and brother in the background of the monument. Photo: Leadville Today.

Brad Palmer (left) and son Dustin (in Navy whites – right) listen to a Memorial Day speech by John Christiansan during Monday’s service. Nick Palmer’s Fallen Soldier Battle Cross is pictured between his father and brother in the background. Photo: Leadville Today.

Widow Left Behind from Fire Needs Help

This one’s a real heart-breaker, so be advised. But Leadvillites always pull together to help out their neighbors!

Lake Fork Mobile Home Park south of Leadville

Lake Fork Mobile Home Park south of Leadville

Many LT readers may remember the May 15 fire at the Lake Fork Mobile Home Park south of Leadville. If not, here’s the LINK to the original story.Well tragically, it turns out that this was the home of Dale & Jeanine Bowers, described as a “dear elderly Leadville couple,” on the First Baptist Church of Leadville’s Facebook Page. In the initial report from the Lake County Office of Emergency Management, it was stated that a male was removed from the smoke-filled unit and eventually transported to the St. Anthony Summit Medical Center in Frisco in serious condition. The following update was posted on the Church’s page, including a crowd source funding link where people may contribute to the deceased’s services as well as his widow’s dire situation:

Hello church & community folks. Just over a week ago, a dear elderly Leadville couple, Dale & Jeanine Bowers were struck with a tragedy as their home was destroyed by fire. After being rescued and resuscitated, Dale passed from this world to the next last Saturday, and Jeanine is now left with virtually no resources. We are praying that God would provide the funds for Jeanine to properly say goodbye to her husband and find a new place to live. FBCL will be doing what we can to continue to love this lady and help her to carry the burden that she now has. If you’d like to help, feel free to designate a gift for her at the church on Sunday and/or give through Paypal through the following link that a lady in the church has set up: LINK.

Dr. Wayne Callen to Retire, Effective July 2014

After thirty five years providing family medicine in Leadville, Wayne Callen, MD will retire on July 11, 2014. 

Dr. Wayne Callen

Dr. Wayne Callen

 

Dr. Callen came to Leadville in 1978 to be employed with a medical group which included Dr. Kehoe and Dr. Philbin.  In a short time he joined their practice and has been a dedicated health care professional in Leadville and Lake County ever since.  

Callen was as passionate then as he is now about rural medicine. In the late 70’s rural family doctors were involved in a broader spectrum of care then they are today. It was an exciting time for a new doctor.  

“It is rare these days that a physician cares for generations of family members. Caring for the children and grandchildren of my initial patients has been very rewarding,” said Dr. Callen. 

Currently Gary Petry, MD and Jackie Duba MPH, PA offer family medicine at the SVH Leadville Medical Clinic and will continue to do so. The hospital does plan to add an additional provider to the clinic medical staff in the near future. 

“Everyone comes to retirement age at some point. And though I truly value my patients, the family practice, St. Vincent Hospital staff and my time spent here, it is my time to retire,” remarked Callen “My immediate plans are to travel overseas extensively and find some palm trees in the warmth of the sun.” 

Peggy Frank, SVH Leadville Medical Clinic Director is available to answer any patient questions at 719-486-1264.  Frank stated that “Doctor Callen will surely be missed, it is my goal to carry on his commitment and dedication to patient care.”
Obit_Spacer_Thin

The lake County Road & Bridge Department has begun the task of plowing the Turquoise Lake Road. Looks like it could take a while - there's lot of snow on the back side. Photo: LCR&B.

The Lake County Road & Bridge Department has begun the task of plowing the Turquoise Lake Road. It could take a while – there’s lot of snow on the back side.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

SinkHole_Repair copy

Obit_Spacer_Thin

LCHS Lions Career Fair To Be Held This Thursday

This Thursday, April 24 over 500 students will get a chance to talk with invited professionals from a wide array of occupations at the 16th Annual Lake County High School/Leadville Lions Club Annual Career Fair.

Leadville Lions Club Annual Career Fair at LCHS

Leadville Lions Club Annual Career Fair at LCHS

“This year, students can look forward to speaking with an Astronaut as well as a Professional Sports Agent,” said Carol Glenn, the Career Fair Chairman.  “And of course, all of our  Lake County business people will be sharing their career advice as well. We’re grateful for the strong support this event  receives  from  the Leadville community; it’s incredible.” 

The Fair begins at 8 a.m. at Lake County High School and is offered to LCHS students as well as students from surrounding high schools and Lake County Middle School students. The format allows students to spend approximately 50 minutes in their areas of interest where they can interact with a variety of presenters and get a chance to ask questions.  Over 90 presenters are expected to attend. The Career Fair presentations will be done not only by business people from Lake County and surrounding areas but also by professionals from other parts of the state. 

Over 90 presenters from near and far will be at the Career Fair!

Over 90 presenters from near and far will be at the Career Fair!

“The point is to give students as many chances to ask questions and explore possibilities in a healthy and safe environment,” said Bob Deister, a community volunteer for the Career Fair.  “And, we hope that by exposing the students to a new range of choices and dreams, they will also bring new questions and focus to their current education.”

One of the changes that presenters can expect deals with parking logistics as a result of the renovation underway at the high school. Since space is already at a premium under present construction conditions, Career Fair organizers will be shuttling presenters to nearby parking at the Community Field  as well as the Presbyterian Church. Presenters will be allowed to drop off supplies at the back doors of the gym as usual, but then will be asked to park off-site at the two nearby locations where they can pick up a shuttle bus back to the high school.

The Lions Club and the School to Career Partnership have designed the Career Fair to be part of an overall effort to expose students to career options and to raise their aspirations.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Hundreds of Leadville and Lake County residents took advantage of the low and no-cost health screenings at the 9Health Fair last Saturday.

Hundreds of Leadville and Lake County residents took advantage of the low and no-cost health screenings at the 9Health Fair last Saturday.

Obit_Spacer_Thin

Colo. Scenic & Historic Byways Celebrate 25 Years!

No doubt, you’ve seen the signs. For most local commuters, their relevancy flies by like the many other roadside signs declaring highway memorials or cleanup crews. LogoBigBut this year, Colorado’s Scenic and Historic Byways program is celebrating its 25th anniversary. It has arguably earned a “pull over and check it out” status, even for locals.

Besides, those little “Top Of The Rockies Scenic Byway” signs literally bring thousands of travelers into and through Leadville and Lake County, hopefully spending some money along the way.TopOfRockies_Map

Obit_Spacer_Thin

It all started back in 1989, when Colorado began the Scenic and Historic Byways program to promote the state’s exceptional travel opportunities. This month, March 2014, actually marks 25 years for the program, an anniversary recently marked by Governor John Hickenlooper signing the proclamation last week at the State Capitol.Scenic Byways

In fact, eleven of Colorado’s 25 byways are designated by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation as America’s Byways®, which gives Colorado more national designations than any other state. All of these scenic highway routes have names highlighting their unique attributes and sights. For Leadville and Lake County it’s Top of the Rockies. That designation was established in 1998 by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation making it one of the eleven America’s Byways® designated in Colorado.

So be sure to take notice of these highway markers and enjoy your ride on the Top of the Rockies Scenic and Historic Byway.

Want to find out more? Want to read all of the great scenic and historic information about the Top of the Rockies route that passes through Leadville and Lake County? LINK.

Top of the Rockies was designated by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation as a National Scenic Byway in 1998. It is one of eleven America's Byways® designated in Colorado. Photo: CDOT

Top of the Rockies was designated by the U.S. Secretary of Transportation as a National Scenic Byway in 1998. It is one of eleven America’s Byways® designated in Colorado. Photo: CDOT

Obit_Spacer_Thin

When the Saints Come Marching In! The Staff at St. Vincent Hospital honored St. Patrick in the St. Patrick's Day Parade on Monday. Photo: Meghan Buzan.

When the Saints Come Marching In! The Staff at St. Vincent Hospital honored St. Patrick in the St. Patrick’s Day Parade on Monday. Photo: Meghan Buzan.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s