Tag Archives: Leadville

Latest News – March 5

Snow + Fat Tires = Leadville’s Mineral Belt Mayhem!

There’s nothing like piles and piles of fresh snow, followed by a clear, starry Colorado night to get a bunch of fat-tire enthusiasts to the start line. So when you spot all of those headlamps riding down Harrison Avenue under a full moon this Saturday night , you’ll know its just The Cloud City Wheelers, along with dozens of other riders setting out on the next snowy course in the race series. 

Leadville's Mineral Belt Mayhem saw 84 cyclists gearing up for a night race. Photo: Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series.

Leadville’s Mineral Belt Mayhem cyclists gear up for a night race. Photo: Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series.

The Leadville Winter Mountain Bikes Series will continue this Saturday, March 7 with the Mineral Belt Mayhem, an 11 mile loop on the Mineral Belt Trail at night! Registration starts at 6:15 p.m. at Leadville’s local bike shop, Cycles of Life at 309 Harrison and it’ll cost you $20. The race starts at 7 p.m. and no doubt there will be a record numbers of racers for this popular, ever-growing segment of mountain bike racing . . . in the snow!

Headlamps burn bright against the night sky on historic Harrison Avenue. Photo: Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series.

Headlamps burn bright against Harrison Avenue’s neon. Photo: Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series.

The next – and last – race in the series will be the East Side Epic on April 18. So if you haven’t joined in the fun this year, grab your fat bike and winter gear, and get out there.  With the current conditions and more snow on the way, the last race should live up to its name: EPIC!

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Lead Vegas Comes Alive for Ski Joring Weekend 

Well, if it’s a festival weekend in Leadville, you can be sure that there will be some nightlife in old Lead Vegas. LeadVegasSignOf course, you’re likely to find those Ski Joring cowboys, and spectators tearing up the dance floor over at the Elks Lodge on Saturday night. Country Rock favorite Jones and Raine will be kicking up the dust starting at 8:30 p.m. for the Annual Ski Joring Dance. The public is welcome and there is no cover charge.

But if you’re “in-it” for the weekend, if you’re looking to wear out those dance shoes, and shake that money-maker till there’s not a dime left, then The Scarlet is the place to be. Chuck and Lee’s commitment to keep nightlife in Lead Vegas ALIVE will reign supreme on the corner of 4th and Harrison for Ski Joring weekend.

ScarletBarFriday night kicks off with Hayes, Epp and Bones and you know that Leadville’s “old guard” will be out for this classic rock show, because these musicians never disappoint!

Saturday night at The “Scar Bar,”  looks like the billing for the true neon strip, as three acts are on the marquee. Starting at 9:30 p.m. get your funny bone moving with a set from Comedian Dillon Narcissi. Yep, can’t recall the last time that happened, but he’s gotta have the chops just to get up and be funny in front of a bunch of crazy cowboys who’ve been racing horses on the Harrison Avenue snow all day!

The music and dancing will start with Ye Ol’ Dirty Bastards, taking the stage at 10 p.m. for some classic rock tunes.

And while your Mama used to tell you that nothing good ever happens after midnight, she’ll probably be proven wrong this Saturday night when local favorite’s Leadville Cherokee kick up with a Full Moon Midnight set that’s sure to be talked about for weeks. And no doubt, they’ll be playing some great tunes off their new CD, How To Build A Fire.

Now, if you find yourself on Sunday afternoon, watching that last horse, rider and skier take that last run, and you’re still not quite ready to give it up, you are invited to “return to the scene of the crime” for more good fun at The Scarlet. There will be an Open Jam from 5 – 9 p.m. with local musicians.

So, there you have it, your Lead Vegas report for the Ski Joring Weekend. Have fun, stay safe, and remember don’t drink and drive. We’d tell you to call a cab, but there are none in Lead Vegas . . . really gotta fix that!Obit_Spacer_Thin

Nordic Knockouts in the Dark: Winter Fun!

Friday of Ski Joring weekend is spent moving and hauling truckloads of snow to build the magnificent race course and jumps.  But before the BIG races get started on Saturday, you’ll find a hearty and skilled group of Nordic skiers who take advantage of the freshly laid snow in downtown Leadville.

The Harrison Nordic Knockout Sprints will take place under the rising full moon on Friday, March 6. The competition happens between 7th and 8th Streets on Harrison Ave. Races start at 7 p.m., with sign-up at 6:30 at Melanzana.

Is that a podium or a ski jump? Congrats to the Nordic Knockout Harrison Sprints victors! Photo: Julia Martinez.

Leadville’s Harrison Nordic Knockout Sprints take place on Friday of Ski Joring Weekend! Photo: Julia Martinez.

The competition is a double elimination with two skiers starting and the fastest racer advancing to the next round of competition. Entry fee is $3 for a 400 meter sprint. Many of the local high school Nordic skiers will tip-up to the start line and always fare quite well, marking for many, the last race of the season. To keep up with skinny-ski news, connect with the Leadville Nordic website  

Fast-paced Nordic sprints under the cover of darkness on historic Harrison Avenue: Leadville Winter Fun! Photo: Julia Martinez

Fast-paced Nordic sprints under the cover of darkness on historic Harrison Avenue: Leadville Winter Fun! Photo: Julia Martinez

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Annual Paintball Biathlon Canceled for 2015

The Annual Paintball Biathlon held at the Tennessee Pass Nordic Center during Ski Joring Weekend has been canceled. Obit_Spacer_Thin

How About Dinner and A View for a Good Cause?!

Okay, so you’re going to be in Leadville Saturday night and looking to do something different for dinner. Something delicious, of course, but maybe something for a good cause as well.

Saturday Night Dinner Fundraiser at Tennessee Pass Nordic Center starts at 5:30 p.m. Good food, good cause!

Saturday Night Dinner Fundraiser at Tennessee Pass Nordic Center at 5:30 p.m. Good food, good cause!

Then head on out to the Tennessee Pass Nordic Center from 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. for the Lake County Project Dream 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC) after school programs’ fundraiser dinner and silent auction.  All proceeds of this event will be used to continue programming for youth this summer and next fall especially for the drama and science programs. 

Tickets are $20 for adults and $10 for children (children under 5 are free).  You can purchase your tickets at the Lake County Intermediate School office or by calling Susan Fishman at 719-293-0115 or Kristal Bertonneau at 719-293-5363.  This will be a fun-filled and beneficial evening. 

About 21st Century Community Learning Center (21st CCLC )

The 21st CCLC is a federal grant received by the Lake County School District to provide academic and enrichment programs after school and in the summer for K- 12th grade students and their families. 

The 21st CCLC  provides academic and enrichment programs after school and in the summer for K- 12th grade students and their families. In this picture students participate in the egg drop.

The 21st CCLC provides academic and enrichment programs for K- 12th grade students and their families. In this picture students participate in the egg drop.

The grant for 5th-12th graders ended in December 2014 and the group of dedicated educators has been funding programs with smaller grants, donations, and fundraisers. 

They have applied for a new 5 year grant and will be notified soon. The K-4th grade grant is in its third year and funding for the final years is reduced by 20% so that programs begin the work of sustainability.   The programs have consistently served over 500 students in Lake County each year.  Offerings include homework help and tutoring, woodshop, music production, Mad Scientist, Lego Robotics, art, fitness, drama, dance, soccer, cooking, guitar, piano, and much more.  Daily nutritional snacks are provided by Food Bank of the Rockies and transportation is provided in the evening.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Shelter Dog Shuffle Saturday, The Seventh

Leadville Dogsled Champion Steph Dwyer reported to Leadville Today that even though the ever-popular Mt. Massive Mush isn’t happening this year, there will be the annual Shelter Dog Shuffle to raise some money for the Leadville/Lake County Animal Shelter.

The Shelter Dog Shuffle: Cross-Country meets Canine. Photo: David Hahn.

The Shelter Dog Shuffle: Cross-Country meets Canine. Photo: David Hahn.

The Shelter Dog Shuffle is a fun ski, run, walk, snowshoe with your dog race with all proceeds benefiting the shelter and  the local spay/neuter program, Planned Pethood.

The event will be held this Saturday, March 7 starting at 9 a.m. There will be newly added fun, with  a couple of dog skijor events.  

For more info, please Call Steph at 719-486-3522.

Latest News – March 4

Leadville Ski Joring: Giddy-Up to Leadville March 7 & 8 

By Kathy Bedell, © 2015 Leadville Today

Colorado is known around the world for its outdoor winter recreation: skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing, ice skating, hockey, ice fishing. But when it comes to the boisterous sport of Ski Joring, Leadville sits tall in the saddle at 10,200 feet with a race course that is surrounded by some of the state’s most notable historic buildings, not to mention Colorado’s two highest peaks.

Leadville Ski Joring. The action is fast, the competition is fierce. Photo: Jim Swanson

Leadville Ski Joring. The action is fast, the competition is fierce. Photo: Jim Swanson

This year marks the 66th Anniversary of Leadville Ski Joring, an event that combines horses and riders with skiers in an action-packed competition that takes place on historic Harrison Avenue. Held the first weekend in March, the celebration will take place Saturday & Sunday, March 7 & 8, 2015.

For those who have never witnessed this sport in person, there’ s nothing quite like seeing skiers hurtle 8 foot jumps and spear rings as they’re towed behind speeding horses with adrenaline-fueled riders at the reins.

The Spirit of The West or something you just have to see in person. Photo: CO Grandpa.

The Spirit of The West or something you just have to see in person  . . .that’s what Leadville Ski Joring is!  Photo: CO Grandpa.

The sport of Ski Joring continues to grow across the country with encouragement from the North American Ski Joring Association. But it’s Leadville Ski Joring that stands out among the other competitions, mainly due to the course, both its build and its location.

Separated into three classes – Open, Sport and Legends –  these winter athletes compete for the cheers from the crowds, the bragging rights that come from a good run or victory, and of course, the hard cold cash! Teams are randomly matched: horse, rider and skier.  

Once the teams are selected, the bidding begins through a Calcutta which takes place at the Announcer’s Stand on Harrison Avenue. This is where the money for daily purses and seed funds for next year’s competition is generated. That combined with a bit of smack talk from long-time competitors and local folks knowing which team combinations have the best chance for victory. Once the Calcutta is finished, the Leadville Ski Joring spectacular begins entertaining the hordes of spectators on historic Harrison Avenue

Jason Dahl (left) and Jody Manley (right) review the Leadville Ski Joring course maps: From pocket-sized to action-packed- just add snow!

Jason Dahl (l) and Jody Manly (r) review the Leadville Ski Joring course maps: just add snow!

But to say that a world-class Ski Joring course just “happens” on Leadville’s main drag might be a bit of an understatement. It takes about 200 loads of snow and about five and a half hours to cover Harrison Avenue from 8th Street to 3rd Street.

Yep, that’s right after months of plowing the snow off the highway – Harrison Avenue is also Highway 24 and regularly plowed by the Colorado Department of Transportation – the local street department dumps the snow back ONTO Harrison Avenue. But it’s this unique setting that makes the course not only fun for the crowds but also for the competitors.

There’s usually a whole herd of volunteers out there pushing the snow and helping to set-up the course on Friday, but it’s the one and only Jody Manly who designs the course. He’s the guy who maps it out, who says how high, who says how far.

According to Manly, it’s important, from a safety perspective that the jumps be properly shaped: if they’re not, skiers have a greater risk of injury. They have to have be smooth, sloped to the right side, and have the right length-to-height ratio.

Horse + Rider + Skier = Leadville Ski Joring. Photo: Jim Morris

Horse + Rider + Skier = Leadville Ski Joring. Photo: Jim Morris

But before the jumps can be built, Jody Manly has to stake out the course. It’s here that the horses’ safety is taken into account. In fact, if you’ve ever seen Jody, a third generation Leadville guy, walk out the course with those special measurements of stride and handmade depth-measuring tools you’d know that at this point, he’s calculating safety with the horse – not the skier or rider – in mind.

Will James riding Goose wastes no time getting down historic Harrison Avenue. Photo: Leadville Ski Joring.

Will James riding Goose wastes no time getting down historic Harrison Avenue. Photo: Leadville Ski Joring.

Leadville Ski Joring fans won’t see any changes when it comes to the BIG competition, but there are some notable changes for the kids’ participation. Leadville Ski Joring organizers have decided to run the Kids Event a bit different this year, somewhat of a throwback to the way it used to be. Any child who wishes to do ONE Fun Run down the course, may line up at the START at 10:30 a.m. on Saturday (only), March 7. While there will not be a formal competition, kids will be timed. This year’s Kids Event will be FREE, and each child will receive a ribbon and 50-cent piece for taking on the challenge!

Nina Schamberger keenly takes the course during the Kids Event - NOW BOTH DAYS!

Nina Schamberger keenly takes the course during the Kids Event!

One last thing: This year, Leadville Ski Joring organizers are committed to streamlining the schedule and keeping the crowds better informed of what’s happening on the course and around town. You can also stay connected through the Leadville Ski Joring Facebook Page.

Here’s a schedule of events, but keep in mind this is Leadville and things don’t always go according to plan. So be patient, do a little shopping, grab a bite to eat, take a load off and have a cold (or hot) drink. After all, the whole reason this event is put on is to bring folks up to Leadville and put on a show they’re not likely to forget. Yee-Haw!

A Leadville Tradition since 1949. Photo: Leadville Ski Joring

A Leadville Tradition since 1949.
Photo (1956) Leadville Ski Joring. Left to right: 1st Place skier Ed Kerrigan of Leadville with Rider Joe Gash of Gilman; 2nd Place Rider Fritz Hauser of Leadville with Skier Heiko Kuhn, A Leadville Teacher. In the Background (center): John Hren.

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Latest News – March 3

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Public Safety Community Meeting TONIGHT at 6 p.m.

Are you concerned about recent Public Safety issues in Leadville and Lake County? Well, it’s time to talk about it and get some answers. And (thankfully), as usual, it’s a group of concerned citizens who are getting the job done.Public_Safety_Meeting_Post_Web

TONIGHT Tuesday, March 3, there will be a Public Safety meeting at the “Old Movie Theater” in the R.J. McGregor Building at 115 W. 6th Street. The program starts at 6 p.m.

According to the citizen-activist organizers, there will be a facilitator at the meeting who will be asking questions from the audience and some submitted from the community, to a local panel, including law enforcement. The conversation will primarily focus on several recent cases and incidents that have increased concerns about Public Safety from the Leadville and Lake County community. According to the citizen’s group, the panel will consist of “The Chief of Police, The Sheriff, A SANE Nurse, A local Therapist, An Advocate and our District Attorney.”Obit_Spacer_Thin

Donner, Party of One: Your Close-Up Is Ready!

The wintery scene opens in a high alpine setting; it’s mid-December and supplies have run extremely low. The rapid succession of snowstorms has limited access to the outside world. Even the toughest mountaineers feel trapped in the unforgiving terrain, that seems to be closing in by the minute.

While some Leadville residents might call this Tuesday in winter, for the producers of a new 2-hour documentary about the infamous Donner party, it’s the scene that screams “Open Call” for Leadville extras and local talent.ThinkFactory

Think Factory Media will be filming this Weather Channel Documentary in Leadville from March 8 thru March 21. The company choose Leadville, because as the Highest City in North America, it was most likely to have the necessary snow for the storyline.

The film company is also hiring some local folks. Here’s how you can become involved:

DOCUMENTARY STAFFING

Looking for a few assistants to help in our Production and Art departments. We will be filming in Leadville. Dates will be roughly 3/8 – 3/21 (2 weeks total: 1 week for prep, 1 week shoot and wrap). Documentary is about the Donner Party.

PRODUCTION ASSISTANTS

Looking for hard working people that are local to Leadville that have their own vehicles, trucks are a plus. Must be familiar with the Leadville and surrounding areas. Responsibilities will include, but not limited to: Setting up and maintaining the local production office, driving crew and cast to and from the airport and set, driving to various vendors for pick-ups, setting up crafty, loading and unloading gear, assisting Assistant Directors wrangle cast, assists various departments daily, and assisting with returns upon completion of filming. Must have a clean driving record and comfortable driving in winter conditions. Will need to pass a background check. If you own and/or can operate a snow mobile, please let us know. Workdays will be 12 hours. Must be 21+.

ART ASSISTANTS

Looking for hard working people that are local to Leadville that have their own vehicles, trucks are a plus. Must be familiar with the Leadville and surrounding areas. Responsibilities will be to assist the Art Department. Some tasks will include, but not limited to: loading and unloading props and art materials, driving to pick up Art supplies, help to reconstruct cabins and lean-tos (cabins will be built off site and reassembled on set), and assist our Set Decorator, Prop Master, and Production Designer with daily needs. The majority of your work will be outside. Previous experience, working with tools and ability to drive a 26-feet truck is a plus. Must have a clean driving record and comfortable driving in winter conditions. Will need to pass a background check. If you own and/or can operate a snow mobile, please let us know. Workdays will be 12 hours. Must be 21+.

ACTORS/EXTRAS

Sounds like they’re already secured a majority of their actors from a Vail Theater Company, but they are still looking for a few more. Get discovered!

CONTACT

Mayen Ma, Supervising Producer, Thinkfactory Media. Office (310) 473-0900, cell: 718-344-1626 r email: mma@thinkfactorymedia.com. Or locally, call Kim at the Leadville Workforce Center. 719-486-2426.

ABOUT THE DONNER PARTY:

According to Wikipedia: 

“The Donner Party was a group of American pioneers who set out for California in a wagon train. Delayed by a series of mishaps, they spent the winter of 1846–47 snowbound in thevSierra Nevadas. Some of the migrants resorted to cannibalism to survive, eating those who had succumbed to starvation and sickness.

DonnerPartyThe journey west usually took between five and six months, but the Donner Party was slowed by following a new route called Hastings Cutoff, which crossed Utah’s Wasatch Mountains and Great Salt Lake Desert. The rugged terrain, and difficulties encountered while traveling along the Humboldt River in present-day Nevada, resulted in the loss of many cattle and wagons, and splits within the group.

By the beginning of November 1846 the emigrants had reached the Sierra Nevada, where they became trapped by an early, heavy snowfall near Truckee (now Donner) Lake, high in the mountains. Their food supplies ran extremely low, and in mid-December some of the group set out on foot to obtain help. Rescuers from California attempted to reach the emigrants, but the first relief party did not arrive until the middle of February 1847, almost four months after the wagon train became trapped. Of the 87 members of the party, 48 survived to reach California.

Historians have described the episode as one of the most bizarre and spectacular tragedies in Californian history and in the record of western migration.”

 

 

Latest News – March 2

The Tabor Grand: Leadville’s $8M Historic Renovation

By Kathy Bedell © 2015 Leadville Today

The Tabor Grand.  The Vendome.  Home to the old “Side Door.” Home to the “Mountain Oasis.”  The Tabor Grand Hotel.

The Tabor Grand Hotel in 1885 in Leadville. Also known for years as the Vendome Hotel, The Tabor Grand Hotel was undergone a $8 million historic renovation. Photo: Overland Property Group.

The Tabor Grand Hotel originally opened in 1885 in Leadville. Known for years as the Vendome Hotel, The Tabor Grand has undergone a $8m historic renovation this year. Photo: Overland Property Group.

When it comes to this historic gem on the northwest corner of 7th and Harrison in downtown Leadville, what you call it may have a lot to do with how long you’ve lived here, as well as when you may have lived, or worked, in this architectural beauty. Regardless, this Saturday, March 7, the building will have its official Grand Re-Opening under the name The Tabor Grand Hotel Apartments.

After a year of renovation work, and an $8 million re-investment, the Overland Property Group (OPG) will officially “cut the ribbon” on the historic renovation this Saturday, March 7. As part of the Leadville Ski Joring Opening Ceremony at High Noon on Harrison Avenue, the Tabor Grand Hotel Apartments will be having a re-dedication ceremony starting at 1 p.m., with self-guided tours of the historic renovation from 1:30 – 5 p.m.

“We are so excited about this project and now we’ll be able to show off all those renovation efforts and hard work,” said Matt Graham, OPG’s Vice President of Development.

The historic Tabor Grand Hotel Apartments was encased in scaffolding  for most of the summer and fall 2014. The Grand Re-Openign will be held March 7, 2015 at 1 p.m.

The historic Tabor Grand Hotel Apartments was encased in scaffolding for most of the summer and fall 2014. The Grand Re-Openign will be held March 7, 2015 at 1 p.m.

“Wowser, looks like they’re serious this time!” That was one of the first comments posted when this picture of the Tabor Grand Hotel’s renovation project was posted on the Leadville Today Facebook page. After all, this 130 Harrison Avenue anchor had seen better days, as well as half-hearted fixes in recent decades.

But yes, before long it was apparent to most Leadville residents that “they” were serious about taking care of this incredible part of Leadville’s heritage. So who exactly are “they”? The Overland Property Group (OPG) out of Kansas City, Kan. bought the property one year ago in March 2014, after hearing that the historic gem was for sale, and needed major renovation work.

“We came into the conversation in December of 2013,” said Matt Gillam, OPG’s Vice President of Development, in an interview with Leadville Today. “But the opportunity to own and work on such a project was hard to pass up.”

And Colorado-history lovers would agree that the Overland Property Group were the right people for the job. After all, The Tabor Grand has seen its share of band-aid fixes for what is considered to be one of Leadville’s crowning jewels on historic Harrison Avenue. Recent years, saw the old gal deteriorating one brick at a time, at an ever-increasing rate, creating danger to the public.

Brick by brick: Restored, replaced and sealed. Photo: OPG

Brick by brick: Restored, replaced and sealed. Photo: OPG

“Our intention was to thoughtfully preserve the building. To have the renovation done correctly,” stated Gillam, adding that this method would ensure another 50-70 years of life for the building.

The plan was extensive, including a complete interior and exterior renovation of the building, nuts to bolts. On the exterior, that included installing a new roof, sealing the brick, restoring all of the unique cornices, and bringing all those windows back to their original state, including the old ropes used to open and close them. Unfortunately, not a lot of the window panes are original, so OPG worked with the historic commission and a specialized window refurbisher to get double paned, energy efficient windows milled into the current shape. As an example to commitment, OVP chose the $600,000 window renovation bid, not the $125,000 one. In this video you can see for yourself what a difference that makes for this 130 year old building. And yes, the “Baby Doe Box” window remains in tack!

Check out this VIDEO of the renovation work – BEAUTIFUL!

As Gillam mentioned in the video, companies like Sherwin-Williams Paint was anxious to work on such a dedicated historic renovation project. Not only did the exterior paint upgrade enable Leadville’s Tabor Grand Hotel Apartments to be brought back to its former glory, but the building will now also stand as a model for innovative paint technology. The paint company used a special paint that contains sunscreen for the intense sunlight that the building endures at 10,200 feet. In fact, like many visitor’s eventual love affair with The Magic City, Sherwin-Williams has morphed its commitment into highlighting the beautiful Tabor Grand on its Spring paint catalog cover!

All of the 37 residential units will be completely overhauled. Photo:OPG.

All of the 37 residential units have been completely overhauled. Photo:Overland Property Group.

On the interior of the building, it’s been a complete overhaul for the 37 residential, one and two bedroom units, including all new appliances, tile, cabinets, paint, all of it! And OPG kept tenants in mind when developing the plan. In fact, 31 of the 37 residential units remained occupied during the overhaul, shifting tenants periodically as the next round of interior work got underway. 

“We worked hard not having to displace any tenants during renovation,” said Gillam. And the low-income housing qualifications will remain in place for residential tenants as well. Yes, an actual room with a view, that doesn’t cost an arm and a leg.

While the top floors are residential, the building’s street-level units remain commercial, and some of the best on Harrison Avenue.  

“They all plan on staying on,” said Gillam. However, the OPG renovation did not include the interior to commercial spaces, that’s up to each business, although several are considering a remodel. Some of that interior commercial space will be the leasing office for Overland Property Group, including a new community lounge room, which people can see during the self guided tours this Saturday, March 7 from 1:30 – 5 p.m.

“We are trying to make that space as historically relevant as possible, “explained Gillam.  “We feel like we’re stewards to this building and want to remain true to the time period the building represents.”

One of the things that won’t be changing is the property managers, Terrence and Deb McNicholis. “They are great people, so we’re exciting that they are going to stay on with us,” added Gillam, a sentiment echoed by a host of locals as well.

 “We wanted to make sure that the renovation that we did preserves the Tabor Grand, which is such a dominate piece of history, not only for Leadville, but the entire state of Colorado,” stated Gillam. “Now that the project is complete, we believe, that it should win national awards and continue to be a pride for Leadville and Colorado.”

So, put on your party duds, Leadville! It’s time to celebrate one of Harrison Avenue’s Grande Dames of architecture. She’s looking pretty good for 130 years. It’s time to party like it’s 1885!

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Latest News – March 1

SKI NEWS: Alpine, Nordic, Joring

Spring Break Skiing: Cooper’s . . . Best. Deal. Ever.

March is underway and with it, news of Spring Break visitors, along with the ski deals and packages. Everybody seems to be planning a trip this time of year. And if yours includes taking in some skiing or boarding on some of the best NATURAL snow the Rocky Mountains has to offer, then check out Ski Cooper’s Best. Deal. Ever.5Friday

Come on up to Cooper on this Friday, March 6 and ski all day for just $5! Adults, kids, seniors… all just $5 for a full-day lift ticket.

You won’t find a better deal, so make sure to get head up to Leadville next Friday and spend the day on the slopes at Cooper! What are you waiting for? Buy lift tickets now!

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Tenth Mountain Division Veterans and other skiers mark the annual celebration of these special soldiers with a Ski-In at Ski Cooper, near Leadville. Photo: Terri Gooch.

Tenth Mountain Division Veterans and other skiers mark the annual celebration of these special soldiers with a Ski-In at Ski Cooper, near Leadville. Photo: Terri Gooch.

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Teach Your Children Well: Children Will Excel

By Terri Gooch, Ski Cooper Instructor

Ski Cooper Instructor Terri Gooch

Ski Cooper Instructor Terri Gooch

As a children’s ski instructor, the greatest reward I receive from teaching the little people is watching them break through barriers. It is a joy to watch them go from wanting to give up in the first hour, to being proud and excited that they learned how to ski. They not only learned how to ski, but they boosted their confidence and had tons of fun.

At the end of every lesson, they are always eager to show off their super skiing abilities to their parents, who are beyond proud of their children. Usually, these children are eager to ski again, because skiing is fun and makes them feel good about themselves.

Unfortunately, some children are not always able to break through the barriers holding them back. In my experience as a children’s ski instructor, the biggest barrier to a child’s growth is their parents. A ten-year old girl was ready to give up after an hour, even though she was doing great. Her parents told her that if she didn’t like skiing after one hour, she could quit. She was ready to give up exactly one hour into what was an all-day lesson. Somehow, I convinced her to spend the day with me. Her older sister on the other hand, gave up exactly one hour into her lesson and sat in the lodge all day.

Teach Your Children Well: Children Will Excel. Photo: Terri Gooch/LeadvilleToday

Teach Your Children Well: Children Will Excel. Photo: Terri Gooch/LeadvilleToday

Instead of giving your children permission to quit, feed their confidence with reasons to try and have fun learning. Children are far more open to learning when their parents give them space and allow them the freedom to grow. I have heard children screaming at their parents to go away during a lesson. I have seen a child go from skiing to a complete halt when his mom showed up to take photos. I can tell you from experience, that given the opportunity, children will excel.

At Ski Cooper, where I instruct, we have a learn to ski program for a local pre-school of four and five year old children. Twice a week for a month they come for ski lessons; before we all ride up in a snow cat to the top of the mountain and ski down. The children are chaperoned by school teachers and parents, who are asked to keep their distance from the children during the lessons. It is an amazing sight to behold riding up in the snow cat and guiding twenty young children down the mountain. They made it to the top…and this is my reward!

Ski Cooper Instructor Terri Gooch (far left) poses with some little skiers after another successful learning and turning day on the slopes. Photo: Terri Gooch/LeadvilleToday.

Ski Cooper Instructor Terri Gooch (far left) poses with some little skiers after another successful learning and turning day on the slopes. Photo: Terri Gooch.

As a children’s Ski Cooper instructor, it is my passion, purpose, and responsibility to help the little people break through barriers, boost their confidence, and reach greater heights. I am amazed every day by a child’s ability to quickly learn how to ski. It is a joy to watch them having the time of the lives, laughing all the way down the hill.

We must allow our children to be free to grow and reach greater heights and excel in life. Children will excel. 

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It Was Cold, Icy, Windy: The Leadville Loppet 2015

The 12th Annual Leadville Loppet was held last Sunday, Feb. 22 on a cold, icy-snowy kind of day, one that might turn away the more faint-of-heart skinny-ski racer. But not for Leadville locals, their youngens, and quite a good showing of area Nordic notables, as 167 racers participated in the ski competitions, which raise money for the Mineral Belt Trail, a popular multi-use trail which encompasses the city.

A colorful cast of racers takes their mark at the 12th Annual Leadville Loppet 5k Nordic Ski race on Feb. 22. No surprise, from the look on their faces, that the winter weather showed up in a icy-snowy-windy kind of way. Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

A colorful cast of racers takes their mark at the 12th Annual Leadville Loppet 5k Nordic Ski race on Feb. 22. No surprise, from the look on their faces, that the winter weather showed up in a icy-snowy-windy kind of way. Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

This winter event – which begins and ends up at the college – has 44k, 22k, and 10k competitions, with both classic and freestyle components, as well as a shorter, family-fun 5k; all totaled, 7 races! The inclement weather might have been the reason there was a slight dip in participation this year. But those who showed up made the best of it, with sunshiny smiles and friendly camaraderies that might have been more about staying warm, than embracing your competitor!

Fire arms on a cold winter’s day, at the Leadville Loppet start line. Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

Fire arms on a cold winter’s day, at the Leadville Loppet start line. Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

Here’s how the day’s races played out; it’s easy to see that the weather was a factor in times.

All the way from Duarngo, Colo., first place in the 44k classic division was Steve Ilg, with a time of 3:46:48, more than one hour over last year’s winning time. Sebastian Neef, Colorado Springs, Colo. (2:28:30) took top prize in the 44k Freestyle class. On the women’s side, Sarah Hochtl took top spot with a 3:15:25 finish time in the 44k Freestyle and Christine Avena was the top female finisher in the classic division with a time of 5:37:44, nearly two hours behind the first place winner.

 The 22k saw Leadvillite Karl Remsen take top place in the Freestyle with a time of 1:19:20; top female finisher in that same category was Sarah Hudelson from Salida coming in at 1:51:45. On the classic side of the course, a Leadville female reigned supreme, as Ruth McGovern came in the top spot at 1:43:50, with second place male racer Bob Orris, of Nathrop about 15 minutes behind at 2:01:18.

When it came to the 10k race, it was Brandon Sheard of Eagle who took top honors in the Freestyle competition at 41:07. Caroline Benney of Leadville was the top female in the same category at 48:50.  As for the 10k Classic, Leadville teacher Jeff Spencer took First Place at 44:28, followed up closely by Leadville student Charlie Koch with a second place time of 49:52. Harper Powell of Salida rounded out the podium and also took top female honors with a time of 53:44.

For complete race results, connect at the Leadville Loppet website.

This classic Loppet photo is almost worth having a Write-The-Caption contest for. "You are what you wear?" Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

This classic Leadville Loppet photo is almost worth having a Write-The-Caption contest. “You are what you wear? You drink what you wear?” Photo: Brennan Ruegg.

And while the bigger races draw in some of the top skate skiers in the area, it’s the Family-Fun 5K that makes the Leadville Loppet one of Leadville’s top winter events. The 5K podium winners – all from Leadville – were as follows: Nina Schamberger (9 years) with a time of 28:13, Jace Peters (10 years) coming in at 32:50, and third place went to 16-year-old Emma Collins with a 35:06 finish time.

Nothing warms the soul better on a cold Loppet day than the two bright smiles from these Leadville lasses! Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

Nothing warms the soul better on a cold Loppet day than the two bright smiles from these Leadville lasses! Photo: Brennan Ruegg/Leadville Today.

As most know, costumes are highly encouraged in this race and prizes given in a number of unique categories. The kids just love this competition and the whole ball of fun is followed by an awards ceremony that offers more homemade soups, chilis and desserts, than you’ll likely to see in one Lake County gathering.

The Leadville Loppet is a fundraiser for the Mineral Belt Trail, but additionally, the event serves to celebrate winter recreation in Lake County.  What better a way than to host a Nordic event?! And don’t forget, there are two more Nordic events scheduled over weekend: the Nordic Sprints on Harrison and the Paintball Biathlon – LINK

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