Tag Archives: Leadville

Latest News – January 28

Panther Pride Continues Through Nordic Season

On January 24, the Lake County High School and Middle School Ski Teams headed to Maloit Park in Minturn, Colo. for a Nordic race. The homologated courses at Maloit Park provide climbs, descents, and turns that challenge even the best skiers in the state. Girls High School Mass Start

The middle school skiers competed in a 3-kilometer classic race. The boys finished 5th out of 9 teams and were led by Conner Lenhard, who was 44th. Matt Koch and Sam Frykholm skied much of the race together and placed 52nd and 53rd, respectively. The girls were 6th out of 12 teams. Abby Holm placed was 25th, and Hannah Holm was close behind in 28th. Neva Sunday was 37th in an excellent race debut.

Brandon Hanson leads the pack during a climb on the Minturn course at last Saturday’s Nordic race. This was Hanson’s first set of races – Go Panthers! Photo: Vicki Koch.

Brandon Hanson leads the pack during a climb on the Minturn course at last Saturday’s Nordic race. This was Hanson’s first set of races – Go Panthers! Photo: Vicki Koch.

“It was good skiing from all of our skiers today,” noted Coach Jeff Spencer. “We worked on hills a lot this week and it definitely paid off.” 

The high school skiers had two races in one day – a same day pursuit. They raced in a 3-kilometer classic race in the morning, followed by a 3-kilometer skate race in the afternoon. 

Russell Orris was caught up in traffic, but broke free of the pack, finishing 30th in the Jan. 24 meet. Photo: Sarah Hudelson.

Russell Orris was caught up in traffic, but broke free of the pack, finishing 30th in the January 24 Minturn meet. Photo: Sarah Hudelson.

Ethan Greiner led the boys through the high school boys through the classic portion, placing 20th. Taylor Stack was a few places behind in 27th. During the skate race, they swapped, with Stack notching a 19th place finish and Greiner coming in 26th. Russell Orris was caught up in traffic during the classic portion of the race, placing 44th, but he passed a dozen skiers during the skate portion, and placed 30th. These three boys led the team to 7th place finishes in both races. 

Joe Koch placed 47th, during the classic portion of the race, missing qualifying for the state meet by less than 2 seconds. He fought through the skate portion to place 65th. Brandon Hanson completed his first set of races in great form, placing 78th in the classic race and then 67th in the skate. Zayden Tufte showed his skate speed by moving from 91st in the classic race to 80th in the skate portion. Zach Coffin notched an 84th in the classic race and then a 91st in the skate race. 

Jayde Daigle, a skimeister who competes in both alpine and Nordic races, led the Lady Panthers in both races. She was 29th in the classic race and then 28th in the skate race. Caroline Benney had her best classic race of the year and placed 46th, but just like Joe, missed qualifying by one place. She also had a strong skate race to place 50th. Molly Lenhard had a 51st place finish in the classic race, and then skied an agressive skate race to place 46th, again just missing qualifying.

Lady Panthers Molly Lenhard (r) and Lara Lufkin (l) helped the team to place 7th overall. Photo: Sarah Hudelson.

Panthers Molly Lenhard (r) and Lara Lufkin (l) helped the team place 7th overall. Photo: Sarah Hudelson.

These three girls helped the team to place 7th overall. 

Lara Lufkin placed 48th in classic and 52nd in skate as she took it easy this week in preparation for later races. Harper Powell, a first year skier from Salida, placed 64th in both classic and skate – a stellar finish from a first time racer. Alissa Kuster placed 84th in classic and followed with an 85th in the skate race. Courtney Crenshaw was 85th in classic and then 93rd in the skate race. 

Coach Karl Remsen remarked after the races, “Molly, Caroline, and Joe have all had great races as freshman. It’s a bummer they all just missed the qualifying line in their races today. We do have a couple more races, though. I think they can make the cut in those.” 

The skiers will be back in action this weekend at a classic race at Cordillera Ranch in Eagle County. Good Luck Panthers!Obit_Spacer_Thin

Winter Bike Kicks Off Leadville Bike Series in the Snow!

The first race of the Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series was held last Saturday, Jan. 24 at Copper Mountain Resort. This series is sponsored and produced by Leadville’s local bike club, the Cloud City Wheelers and a slew of volunteers, including some “amazing work from all the people at Copper,” according to race organizer Sterling Mudge.

The Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series kicked off on Jan. 24 with Winter Bike at Copper Mountain. Photo: Jay Rustat.

The Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race Series kicked off on Jan. 24 with Winter Bike at Copper Mountain. Next race is Feb. 7 at Tennessee Pass Photo: Jay Rustat.

This first race, formerly known as En Fuego, was re-named Winter Bike at Copper Mountain this year. It also saw some course re-configuration. Both of those changes were well-received by fat-tire enthusiasts and a record 171 racers showed up for the 2015 season kick-off of the Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Race in the series.

“It went great,” said Mudge,indicating that the series continues to grow in notoriety and popularity.  In fact, fat-tire winter riding is the fastest growing segment of the mountain bike sport overall, according to industry experts. Maybe that explains the 1,000+ demo rides provided Leadville’s Cycles of Life at the event.

Race Organizer Sterling Mudge takes a spin on his fat-tire bike, one of the fastest growing segment of mountain biking.

Race Organizer Sterling Mudge takes a spin on his fat-tire bike, one of the fastest growing segments of the mountain biking industry.

“That got a lot of people introduced to this awesome sport,” said Mudge.

And if you’re looking to do just that, then mark the calendar for the second race in the Leadville Winter Mountain Bike Series, it’s the local’s favorite. The Tennessee Pass Night Jam will be held on Saturday, February 7 at 6 p.m. out at the Tennessee Pass Nordic Center, adjacent to Ski Cooper. Oh, and Sterling said something about some live music after the race, so it sounds like a good-old, mountain-biking-riding jamboree! For registration information or to volunteer, connect HERE.

 

 

Latest News – January 27

Mountains Out of Molehills, and an East Coast College

HeadShotGraphicIt’s about notoriety, honor . . . and fame. But when you put those things together, into a discussion about re-naming a mountain, you’re bound to get strong difference of opinions. Such is the case with the recently resurrected topic of re-naming what is familiarly known as “South Mt. Elbert” to “Mount William and Mary.”

Earlier this month, an application with the United States Board on Geographic Names was filed, requesting that a 14,134-foot geographical feature, near Colorado’s tallest mountain, Mount Elbert be re-named “Mount William and Mary.”  Huh? What?

Yes, it’s true, and it’s not the first time either. The initial request was made in 1998 by the college that bears the same name, but was eventually denied because William and Mary didn’t have a strong enough connection to Colorado. So what would this Virginia college’s interest be way out here in Leadville? And has something changed to bring back a strongly opposed and  failed initial attempt? To understand some of those details, here’s a link to The Denver Post story with the specifics:Obit_Spacer_ThinReName_Post_Story_Link

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A Mountain Pass By Any Other Name

One thing that has NOT changed is the feverish controversy that arises when it comes to the naming, or re-naming anything in the high country, especially mountains, or for that matter, mountain passes. For those who know their Colorado history, one of the more famous “re-naming” debacles involved the famous Vail Pass. Did you know that Vail Pass was originally supposed to be located where present-day Monarch Pass is now, south towards Salida? Eventually,  the tough, torch-lighting villagers won out, pushing the Vail tribute north, and forever changing a ski area’s future. For those who may not be familiar with this story: LINK.

So when word started spreading about the possibility of re-naming “South Mt Elbert,” the social media platforms lit-up and the online discussion started to ramp up this past weekend. Leadville and Lake County protesters lit their torches and picked up their pens.

So how can you make your voice heard? Well, since the federal board’s decision relies heavily on local input, it seemed like a good time to share some links where folks can plug into the conversation, record opinions for the official record, and read other local opinions regarding the possible re-naming of “South Mt. Elbert.”

If you’re looking to do things old-school and pick up the pen, you may write directly to the following person BY MARCH 1, 2015.

Mr. Lou Yost, Executive Secretary
U.S. Board on Geographic Names
U.S. Geological Survey
12201 Sunrise Valley Drive, MS 523
Reston, Virginia 20192-0523

If you’re ready to jump on the social media protest bandwagon, readers may connect with Leadville native son and local businessman Eddie Camp who has set up a online petition, where many have already weighed in.Obit_Spacer_Thin

Rename_Againsst_Link_Camp

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Fair and Equal Representation/In Defense of William and Mary

It might be worth noting, that the College of William and Mary has stepped up its efforts for the request this time around, putting into motion an alumnae re-name effort that includes over 1,000 people, who were recently urged by the College President to write letter of support for their effort. But perhaps the boldest move  involves making a Colorado resident and author of the re-naming request, an “honorary” alumnae of the college in order for there to appear to be a more connected “Colorado” tie.

The college also claims that one of their professors “has conducted extensive high-altitude research on the mountain.” But honestly, as a 25-year veteran Leadville journalist, I cannot honestly think of ONE TIME when such ground-breaking research ever crossed my desk. I also can’t think of one time when this institute of higher education extended itself to the local community, offering to share its knowledge and/or resources to a remote mountain community. Admittedly, I could have missed something, so please do weigh in William and Mary. Leadville Today readers can also make their opinions to the college known on the William and Mary Facebook Page and Twitter accounts.

Until then, all you torch-toting villagers, pass the lighter, I’m In . . . the ‘Ville.

 

 

Latest News – January 26

Meeting for Christian Education Home-School Model

There will be a Lake County community meeting for anyone interested in learning about the home school/formal classroom partnership for educating children in grades K through 12. Christian_Edc_imageBased on the National Association of University-Model Schools ® (NAUMS). NAUMS’ vision is to strengthen America’s families and values by helping parents prepare college-worthy, character-witnesses of Christ for the next generation.

The meeting will be held Monday, February 2 at 7:00 p.m. at the Cornerstone Church, located at 117 E. 6th Street in Leadville. Attendees are encouraged to read the information available at the following websites prior to the meeting:

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School District Provides Laptops to 7 – 12 Students 

Last week, the Lake County School District (LCSD) announced a new technology initiative that will place a laptop computer in the hands of every Lake County High School (LCHS) student by the end of February. chromebook2Each 7th-12th grade student will be issued a Samsung Chromebook for educational use at home and at school; the district’s Chromebook initiative is known as a “one-to-one” model because there is one device for every one student in the school.

A Chromebook is a simple laptop using a Google operating system that is mainly used for accessing data stored “in the cloud” and for other Internet-based applications. Data can be downloaded onto the laptop from the cloud so that students without an internet connection at home will still be able to work. Though it is optional, many teachers at the high school are already using Google Apps for Education in their teaching, and ensuring that each student has a Chromebook will support and accelerate the adoption of educational technology in the school.

A new 21st century school should have new laptops - and now they do for 7 - 12 grade students.

A new 21st century school should have new laptops – and now they do for 7 – 12 grade students.

The district’s BEST grant, which funded the new high school construction, is making this investment in technology possible. The grant will fund close to half of the startup cost for the initiative by providing funds for over 200 Chromebooks.

“The district has made its own significant investment in technology in recent years, but the BEST grant is simply an incredible opportunity,” said LCSD Director of Business Operations Kate Bartlett. “We would not have the ability to move to a one-to-one model so quickly without this grant.”

BEST funds were made available for additional Chromebook purchases in part because the high school construction project came in under budget in a number of areas.

In loaning a Chromebook to each student, the district is setting high expectations for personal responsibility on the part of students. Each high school parent will receive a letter explaining how the program will work, and each student and parent will need to sign an acknowledgement of the rules and expectations associated with the loan before receiving a Chromebook.

High school students settle in on their first day in their new school September 3, 2014. The school district recently announced that all 7 - 12 grade students will receive a district-owned Chromebook laptop for their use.

High school students settle in on their first day in their new school September 3, 2014. The school district recently announced that all 7 – 12 grade students will receive a district-owned Chromebook laptop for their use. Photo: Leadville Today.

“We trust our students and their overall positive intent,” said LCHS Principal Christina Gosselin. “They consistently rise to the challenges we set for them. We are confident that our high school students will recognize this program as both a privilege and a responsibility.”

The district’s intent is to continue the one-to-one initiative for the foreseeable future. Students will turn in their Chromebook at the end of the school year for summer maintenance, but will be reissued one again when school starts in August. The district plans to replace the Chromebooks on a rotating three-year cycle.LCHS_Logo_Panther

“This is an incredibly exciting time for our district, our schools, our students and our families,” said LCSD Superintendent Wendy Wyman. “We are making powerful change on a relatively fast timeline, and our one-to-one initiative is a great example of this. Quite simply, our kids can’t wait. They need technology in their hands today in order to take advantage of all that we and the world have to offer them. We have no time to waste.”

 

 

Latest News – January 25

The Leadville Legacy Foundation Gives Back

The Leadville Legacy gave $500 to The Knights of Columbus Polka Dance, which is a charity fundraiser. The Leadville Legacy Foundation is the charitable arm of the Leadville Race Series. Pictured here left to right: Tyrone Rimbert (Legacy Board); Knights of Columbus members: Ray Dawson, Orlando Martinez; and Carl Miller (Legacy Board) and John Circullo (Legacy Board).

The Leadville Legacy gave $500 to The Knights of Columbus Polka Dance, which is a charity fundraiser. The Leadville Legacy Foundation is the charitable arm of the Leadville Race Series. Pictured here left to right: Tyrone Rimbert (Legacy Board); Knights of Columbus members: Ray Dawson, Orlando Martinez; and Carl Miller (Legacy Board) and John Cirullo (Legacy Board). Photo: Leadville Today.

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The Leadville Legacy gave $1000 to the Helping Hands organization and $500 to the Leadville 9 Health Fair. The Leadville Legacy Foundation is the charitable arm of the Leadville Race Series. Pictured here left to right:  Tyrone Rimbert (Legacy Board), John Circullo (Legacy Board), Connie Yant (Helping Hands),  Joann Circullo (9Health Fair) and Carl Miller (Legacy Board).

The Leadville Legacy gave $1000 to the Helping Hands organization and $500 to the Leadville 9 Health Fair. The Leadville Legacy Foundation is the charitable arm of the Leadville Race Series. Pictured here left to right: Tyrone Rimbert (Legacy Board), John Cirullo (Legacy Board), Connie Yant (Helping Hands), Joann Cirullo (9Health Fair) and Carl Miller (Legacy Board). Photo: Leadville Today.

Latest News – January 24

New Honda Commercial Filmed in Twin Lakes

In early December, Twin Lakes was the location shoot for a Honda car commercial. The commercial is starting to make the rounds on some TV stations, back east. In fact, one Leadville Today reader reported that she saw the commercial air in Virginia.

To celebrate, here is some “top secret” video from several December 2014 filming locations. The second video is the final commercial which was recently uploaded onto YouTube. Keep an eye out and report to Leadville Today if you see it airing in Colorado!Obit_Spacer_Thin
The Leadville Today video of the Honda commercial:

The official Honda car commercial video:

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“Dive In” Movie at Leadville Pool on Monday

The Lake County Recreation Department will be presenting its “Dive In” Movie next Monday. Jan. 26. This time, the movie is Disney’s Lilo and Stitch.Lilo _ Stitch _ Movie

Remember, there is no school for students on Monday, as it is a Teacher  Work Day. So if you’re looking for something for your kiddos to do, grab the swim suits and an inflatable device – or you can purchase one for $4  – and head on over to the Lake County Aquatic Center; then sit back and enjoy the show.

The movie can also be viewed from the pool’s on-deck seating. The pool opens at 1 p.m., movie to start shortly after that. This event is great for kids in 2nd grade and above. Admission is $2 and no registration is needed.

Lilo & Stitch Movie: Get ready for the wildly original story about an independent little girl named Lilo and her adopted alien “puppy,” the mischievous Stitch, a runaway genetic experiment from a faraway planet. After crash-landing on Earth, Stitch wreaks havoc on the Hawaiian Islands, but he also learns about loyalty, friendship and ‘ohana, the Hawaiian tradition of family.Obit_Spacer_Thin

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