Tag Archives: Leadville

Latest News – September 2

The Leadville Lake Coounty Fire Rescue crew was out raiing money for Muscular Dystrophy with the "Fill The Boot" campaign held annually on Labor Day. Traffic was high throughout the day, and so were donations!

The Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue crew was out raising money for Muscular Dystrophy with the “Fill The Boot” campaign held annually on Labor Day. Traffic was high throughout the day on historic Harrison Avenue, hopefully, so were donations!

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 Ready, Aim, Fire – Hunting Season is Underway 

The 2014 Colorado Hunting Season officially got underway on Saturday, August 30 with the opening of archery season. HuntignSignPostAnd while the thick of the season – rifle season – doesn’t start for another month, sportsmen and women have already been spotted (or not?) around town in their camouflage get-ups.

Hunters are good for the economy. They not only purchase hunting gear, trucks, ATVs and boats; they also fill their gas tanks and coolers. They stay at motels and resorts. They buy hunting clothes and those goofy hunting hats with sayings like, “If the Lead Don’t Fly, the Meat Don’t Fry.”

According to the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation, 259,000 people hunt in Colorado each year. The group’s data states that hunters spend $221 million a year, on trip-related expenses in Colorado and $185 million on hunting equipment. It says a typical hunter spends $1,800 a year on hunting-related activities.

BigGame_Book_2014 copyObit_Spacer_ThinWhile other places in the state might not appreciate the hunters’ tourism dollars, Lake County is keenly aware of it. And maybe that’s because there is a large population of Leadville hunters, who recognize that wildlife recreation is an important component of the local economy.

Hunters also pay a truckload of special excise taxes, in the form of licenses, fees and equipment. In turn, those funds are earmarked for wildlife and habitat conservation.

And in Lake County, hunting has strong generational ties, with grandpas and granddaughters taking to the trail together, to stock the family’s freezer with fresh game for the winter. Many families rely on their Fall harvest to get them through until Spring!

Another benefit of hunting that should not be under-rated, is that it is good for body, mind and soul. As the world seems to spin faster and faster – even for alpine dwellers – hunting provides a healthy escape. It offers relaxation and affords quality time with family and friends, many times out of range of cell service or internet connection.

So, as the bright orange vests begin their annual migration into the Colorado high country, be sure to make them feel welcome, with a friendly elk bugle.

Rifle Hunting Season for elk doesn't start until October 1, 2014. Photo: David Hahn

Rifle Hunting Season for elk doesn’t start until October 1, 2014. Photo: David Hahn

Latest News – September 1

Race Season Continues, Until the Final Gun!

Thinking about putting those running shoes away? Not so fast! In fact, Leadville and Lake County will see several races this September. One is a repeat, others are new events for the Fall calendar.Rocky Mountain High Marathon_logo

First up, for the first time, is the “Rocky Mountain High-est Leadville Road Marathon and Half-Marathon,” to be held next Sunday, September 7. This new race is sponsored by GECKO (Giving Every Child Knowledge of the Outdoors), a race producer based out of Pagosa Springs, CO.

The race will start at the corner of 6th Street and Harrison Ave. then head west, similar to the LT100 Run start. This race will utilize County Road 4 out to Turquoise Lake with the full Marathon encompassing the Fish Hatchery loop off County Road 5. For course maps click here: Marathon; Half Marathon.

Rocky Mountain High-est Leadville Road Marathon  runners will run along Colorado Highway 300, part of the Fish Hatchery loop road.

Rocky Mountain High-est Leadville Road Marathon runners will run along Colorado Highway 300, part of the Fish Hatchery loop road.

According to their website: Team GECKO has been fans of Leadville Co. for more than twenty years. After years of staging successful racing events in Pagosa Springs Colorado now is the time to realize our dreams of spreading the GECKO word further afield, and Leadville, Colorado is the obvious choice.

The weekend schedule includes race packet pick-up on Saturday from 4 – 7 p.m., as well as race morning, Sunday from 7 a.m. – 8:30 a.m. There is a race briefing at 8:45 a.m. at the Start/Finish line with the race starting at 9 a.m. sharp September 7.

The event is also a United States of America Track and Field Sanctioned race.Obit_Spacer_Thin

 

Cross Country

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Flaming Foliage Comes Thru Lake County at Night

This relay foot race was originally started in 2012 to be an annual adventure race throughout the Colorado high country. However after the inaugural event, the Flaming Foliage Relay was cancelled last year due to the ravaging storms and flooding across Colorado.  But this year, the race is back on the calendar for September 12-13. is an adventure race with a 170-mile route

The route that was originally created by Outward Bound in 1998 but has been revived for the first half of the Flaming Foliage Relay. Starting in Idaho Springs, the route runs through Georgetown, climbs up to the summit of Guanella Pass, descends down to the Burning Bear Trail and other single track trails, climbs up and over Georgia Pass to Breckenridge, then through Frisco to Copper Mountain.

The course then diverges from the original trail, creating a more scenic, remote route by heading up and over Fremont Pass (the relay’s third 11,000 foot pass) to Leadville, around Turquoise Lake, then down the Arkansas River Valley to the finish at River Park in Buena Vista.

Runners may NOT see the Fall Foilage over Fremont Pass during the relay race, considering many of the teams could very well be passing through that part of the course at night!

Runners may NOT see the Fall Foilage over Fremont Pass during the relay race, considering many teams could be passing through that part of the course at night!

Runners will most likely be coming through Lake County and Leadville the night of Saturday, September 13 and into the early morning hours of Sunday, September 14.

The Flaming Foliage Relay is a form of adventure race.  There aren’t any police escorts or pacing crews; the FFR is an adventure-race format that is self-supported and takes place on open trails and roads.  While detailed maps are provided and the course is very well marked, each and every team is expected to support themselves from race start to race finish.

Relay teams are divided into two main categories that tackle the 170 miles of race course: 10-person teams, or Ultra teams. The most popular team organization is the 10-person category (6 – 10 runners)  With the mileage divided into 30 legs, each teammate will have 3 legs to run over the course of the race.  The fun part is the categorization of each team depending upon their demographic makeup.  From mixed to all female to the flatlanders group, all teams will find themselves competing against like teams.  For those looking for a bigger challenge, there is the Ultra team categories (4 – 5 runners), or for the really adventurous, the Super Ultra categories (3 a team).Obit_Spacer_ThinFall-Bike-Tour-PosterFB

 

 

 

Latest News – August 31

Laboring the Weekend Away: 120 years of Labor Day

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Labor Day Weekend: for many, this three-day weekend represents the final fling of summer. In the high country, it’s the last warm-weather holiday for backyard cookouts before the cooler weather sends us indoors.

And while BBQs can be a lot of work, that’s not why it’s called Labor Day. This holiday has paid tribute to the American worker for 120 years.

The roots of this celebration can be traced back to a time when the U.S. workforce was experiencing great transition. The Industrial Revolution was in full swing and people were trading in their rural farm lives for the dream of a secure, year-round income that came with a factory job.  Unfortunately, they often found themselves toiling 12 – 14 hour days in dingy, and sometimes dangerous conditions.

It was his outrage concerning these working conditions that prompted Peter McGuire, a leader of the carpenters union, with the idea of a day for workers to show their solidarity. So in 1882, they had a big parade in New York. Workers showed their disdain for working conditions by carrying signs that read, “Eight hours for work, eight hours for rest and eight hours for recreation!” The whole happening turned out to be more of a festival than a demonstration. There were picnics and fireworks, plus everyone took the day off from work.

Historic Labor Day Parade in New York. Photo: Free Nice Pictures.

Historic Labor Day Parade in New York. Photo: Free Nice Pictures.

The demonstration was successful in capturing the interest of the nation, motivating President Grover Cleveland to sign a bill making the first Monday in September a national holiday honoring the American worker. Ultimately, his gesture was viewed as political, trying to appease an unhappy constituency concerning his handling of a labor strike at the Pullman Company in Chicago which left 34 people dead. Cleveland’s scheme did not work. While Labor Day was established as a national holiday, the president lost his bid for re-election.

That was 1894. So what about today? Is the American worker any better off? While the statistics demonstrate working conditions are safer today than 117 years ago, the mental and emotional turmoil of today’s laborer reigns as the primary concern.  Today if you were to tell your employer that you demanded 8 hours of work, 8 hours of sleep, and 8 hours of recreation, you’d probably find yourself standing in the unemployment line for eight hours. Today’s laborer is expected to come in early, stay late and work on weekends. Today’s American worker is told that they are “lucky to have a job” and that there are 50 people who would be happy to take their position if they’re not content with conditions.

But with unemployment numbers consistently hovering around double digits, perhaps we should stop focusing on revolution, and hope for some evolution within American corporations. In the meantime, those lucky enough to be employed: enjoy your holiday! On the other hand, if you’ll be laboring on Monday, don’t worry; we’ll save a burger from the grill for you.

Latest News – August 30

Git 'Er Done! The north parking lot  at the Lake County Courthouse is coming along nicely thanks to efforts from Lake County Road and Bridge (yes, that's big boss Brad Palmer on the roller!). The lot should be fully paved by the week of Sept. 8 and will gain a couple of parking spots as well as two handicapped spots and a ADA compliant ramp which replaces the steps in the front.

Git ‘Er Done! The north parking lot at the Lake County Courthouse is coming along nicely thanks to efforts from Lake County Road and Bridge (yes, that’s the big boss Brad Palmer on the roller!). The lot should be fully paved by the week of Sept. 8 and will gain a couple of parking spots, as well as two handicapped spots, and a ADA compliant ramp which replaces the steps on the front lawn. Thanks for your patience!

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Leadville Group Formed to Help New Moms

There is a local group that has assembled to provide support for Leadville moms. mother-breast-feeding-her-babyThe mom-to-mom breastfeeding support group will meet the 1st Monday of each month at 10 a.m., at 115 W. 6th St. in the R.J. McGregor Building (i.e. the old movie theater building, the workforce center building). The group’s first meeting will be THIS Monday, Sept. 1 at 10 a.m. Pregnant mamas and older children are welcome to join. They have also established a Facebook Page, where people can connect with the group and get updates.

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Latest News – August 29

Driver’s License Office Open Three Days a Week

Smile! And say hello to Grace Smith-Sodic, who has been appointed as the New Driver’s License Clerk for Lake County. After extensive training (does that include taking good pictures?) Smith is now available to assist local residents with their driver’s license needs.

Service with a smile at the Driver's License Office. Grace Smith-Sodic is ready to assist you!

Service with a smile at the Driver’s License Office. Grace Smith-Sodic is ready to assist you!

The office – which is located off the Lake County Clerk and Recorder’s Office in the courthouse – will be open 3 days a week, from 9 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Friday.

The office can renewal licenses, out of state transfers, written motorcycle and drivers tests for instruction permits, duplicate minor licenses, add medical to CDLs, and add motorcycle endorsement.

“We cannot do any issuances for CDLs, or I-94, or EADS visas from the Leadville office,” explained Smith. “Those customers will need to go to a state office.”

Smith is a native of Leadville and is looking forward to serving Lake County residents in her new position. Obit_Spacer_Thin

Meet New Staff at Leadville/Lake County Airport

Ladies and Gentleman, this is your pilot speaking. Please prepare to be introduced to the new staff at the Leadville/Lake County Airport!

The new High-Flying staff at the Leadville/Lake County Airport (left to right): Operations Technician Zach Dawson and Manager Levi Brown.

The new High-Flying staff at the Leadville/Lake County Airport (left to right): Operations Technician Zach Dawson and Manager Levi Brown. Welcome to Leadville!

Levi Brown has been named Manager at America’s Highest Airport. Brown originally hails from Kansas, where he got most of his training and education. Brown holds a piloting degree from Kansas State University, and has also secured his certificated member status for airport management from Metro State University in Denver. His aviation career started as a commercial pilot.

“I enjoyed it, but you never know where you’re going to be at night,” says Brown. “And the pay isn’t as good as people might imagine it would be.” From there, he went on to do some aviation teaching, as well as time as a charter pilot, flying those big, fast jets around in Kansas.

Brown had originally applied for the Airport Manager position back in 2012. “I didn’t get it, so I went back to school and got my degree in aviation management,” explains Brown.

He also adds marketing to his list of credentials, which should come in handy as operations expand and the Leadville Airport grows it list of services offered at the facility. Brown is single and is looking forward to living the mountain life.

Fuel sales is one of the ways that the airport generates revenue.

Fuel sales for planes is one way that the Leadville/Lake County Airport generates revenue.

Zach Dawson is no stranger to Leadville, but is excited to be working up at the airport as the new Operations Technican. Dawson was born in Colorado, but spent most of his youth in the farming and ranching fields of Montana.

He eventually came back to Colorado, graduating from high school in Boulder, after which he headed up to the mountains to pursue his love of skiing. After years of tallying as many ski days as possible in a season, a skiing accident slowed down his outdoors adventure, and Dawson set his sights on aviation, securing his helicopter license in the Pacific Northwest.

Kids, young and young-at-heart love to see the small planes up close at the Leadville Airport.

The kiddos enjoy seeing the planes up close and meeting the pilots at the Leadville/Lake County Airport’s Annual Drive In/Fly in Pancake Breakfast.

“I decided I like the sun and headed back to Colorado,” says Dawson, referring to the rainy reputation of the Pacific Northwest.  Like Brown, Dawson had applied for positions at the airport before and was called back this July to re-interview for the position of Airport Operations Technician. Dawson has also completed Colorado Mountain College’s Fire Academy class, taught by Captain Simon of the Leadville/Lake County Fire Rescue.  

Dawson is an outdoor-lover and while he still likes to ski, he now  looks at the “quality, not quantity” of his days on the slopes. Personally, a long-term relationship, a couple of dogs, and the love of the outdoor recreation keep Dawson busy during his off-time.

Workers put the finishing touches on the footings and foundation walls of the new 100 x 110 foot state-of-the-art hanger. It’s going to be heated and offer space for plane parking. The project should be complete in early November. The new facility will provide local pilots with a place to park their planes, as well as allowing the airport to expand its operations to draw in more corporate traffic from neighboring ski resorts.

Workers from Lake County Public Works put the finishing touches on the foundation walls of the new 100 x 110 foot state-of-the-art hanger. The project should be complete in early November. The new facility will provide local pilots with a place to park their planes, as well as allow the airport to expand its operations and plans to draw in more corporate jet traffic from neighboring ski resorts.


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Flight & Flapjacks at Airport’s Annual Breakfast

The Leadville/Lake County Airport will host its 6th Annual Pancake Breakfast Fly-In/Drive-In, on Saturday, September 27 from 8 – 10:30 a.m.

The 6th Annnual Fly In/Drive In Pancake Breakfast will be held at the Leadville Airport on Sept. 27

The 6th Annnual Fly In/Drive In Pancake Breakfast will be held at the Leadville Airport on Sept. 27

The new airport staff, as well as many others from the Lake County Public Works Department, will be serving up a hearty breakfast for $6/per person.

If you love airplanes and airports, or if you haven’t been up to the Leadville/Lake County Airport in a while, this is a great time to check out all of the upgrades and meet the new staff. There will be plenty of aircrafts “Flying-In” for the breakfast, most of which you could get a look at up close – something people don’t get too much opportunity to do in a post-911 world. So mark the calendar, and Leadville Today will give you another “gate call” as the date draws nearer. 

Come, Fly Over the Fall Colors at Twin Lakes