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Job Search From the Comfort of Your Home (Computer)

June 5 – “Help Wanted” isn’t quite what it used to be. In fact, in today’s digital world, posting a sign in your business’ window or even placing a traditional classified ad in the newspaper, isn’t always the best option for employers looking to find the best fit for a position. More and more companies are turning to the internet and all the new web-based technologies to recruit the best employees.

Sound intimidating? It doesn’t have to be. And now with the help of the Colorado Workforce Center, the idea of a virtual job fair is just a click away.

“We are hosting a Virtual Job Fair for the Lake, Summit and Eagle counties on June 25th,” said Kim Rodriquez with the Leadville Workforce Center – Colorado Department of Labor and Employment (CDLE). “Our main goal is to provide exposure for our local merchants and businesses as far as their employment needs without having to have a hands-on job fair.”

This new job search tool, which is free for employers and job-seekers alike, will be available to Lake County residents and registered businesses with current job postings through their workforce center office. The platform allows the 62 workforce centers around the state to host multi-day job fairs, or hiring events for individual firms, entirely online. Compared to so-called “brick and mortar” job fairs, this saves money for employers, the unemployed and the workforce center alike.

The platform works through Adobe Connect, a software program that facilitates interactive online meetings. Employers simply send their logo, company description, a link to their company hiring website, and additional content such as photos or videos to Colorado Workforce Center web developers, who post it for job-seekers to view. Through a special site created in partnership with connectingcolorado.com, participating employers will be able to recruit perspective employees by the click of a mouse. Using web technologies is just one more way that CDLE is committed to their objective: “We Keep Colorado Working.”

Still sound intimidating? It doesn’t have to be with a special training session being offered to employers next Monday, June 11 at Colorado Mountain College in Breckenridge, Colo. For employers, the new Virtual Job Fair enables businesses to expand their recruitment pool statewide, rather than searching in one geographic area.

As for the job seekers, they can register at the Colorado Department of Labor’s job portal, www.connectingcolorado.com. On the day of a scheduled job fair, perspective employees will see an icon in their profile allowing them to connect and view job opportunities. Once they’ve clicked on individual companies, job-seekers can chat – or even video chat – with company representatives to set up in-person interviews or arrange to send a resume.

And for job-seekers whose job-hunting skills might be a bit rusty, the platform also features a series of workshops on resume writing, effectively using the Internet, and other job search techniques.

For more information about how to participate as an employer or an employee contact Kim Rodriquez at 719-486-2428.

 

 

COLORADO ECONOMY OUTPERFORMS NATION’S

June 7 – Colorado’s employment and personal income grew faster than the national average between 2000 and 2010, according to a report Wednesday from Headwaters Economics.

The Bozeman, Mont.-based nonprofit research group works to improve community development and land management decisions in the West.

A new report states that Colorado is above the nation in job growth.

The Headwaters paper says personal income grew by 15 percent in Colorado over the decade ending in 2010, ahead of the national growth rate of 14 percent.

It says employment in the state increased by 8 percent, outpacing the 5 percent national average. And that Colorado ranked fifth in the nation for “entrepreneurial activity” in 2010, as measured by new businesses launched per month for every 100,000 residents.

The paper says that over the 10-year period, government and health care/social assistance jobs increased the most in Colorado, followed by finance/insurance, professional/scientific/technical services and real estate.

It’s no surprise to most that the report stated that the biggest job declines were in manufacturing and construction.

The paper argues that there is a correlation between Colorado’s economic prosperity and the state’s success in protecting the natural environment, including national parks, as a contributor to quality of life.

“Protected public lands play an important role by providing recreational opportunities, wildlife habitat, and amenities that attract and keep creative people in Colorado,” Daphne Greenwood, an economics professor at the University of Colorado Colorado Springs, said in the report.

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