Latest News – November 7

Bull Moose Dead, Other Animal Was an Elk

Hunting season always comes with its share of stores and this season is no different. Last week the Colorado Parks and Wildlife officials were in Leadville to investigate a possible Moose Poaching (see story below). Leadville Today just verified with Wildlife Manager Joshua Jiron and lead investigator on the case that those bones ended up being from an elk, which was determined to be legally harvested.

On November 9, Leadville cyclist Chris Albers came across this dead bull moose on a mountain bike trail near Leadville. It was the entire animal although in this photo he appears hunched over. No bullet wounds were found. Investigation pending. Photo: Sterling Mus-dge/Cloud City Wheelers.

On November 9, Leadville cyclist Chris Albers came across this dead bull moose on a mountain bike trail near Leadville. It was the entire animal although in this photo he appears hunched over. No bullet wounds were found. Investigation with the Colorado Parks and Wildlife is pending. Photo: Sterling Mudge/Cloud City Wheelers.

However, yesterday, November 9 local cyclist Chris Albers was riding The Cloud City Wheelers mountain bike trails (ironically Elk Run) and came across a dead bull moose. Jiron was contacted and retrieved the animal from the woods with assistance from local officials. 

“This moose was NOT shot,” Jiron reported to Leadville Today. We checked it at the scene and there were no bullet holes, no point of entry.” From there, the gentle giant was transported down to Fort Collins to the Wildlife Lab where a necropsy will be performed to determine the cause of death.

“It’s sucks,” reported Sterling Medge with the Leadville bike club that maintains the trails. “We’ve posted it on our Facebook page and hope that it brings some awareness.” No doubt the post is getting a lot of traffic: LINK.

If you have any information on this, or any moose poaching incident, you are asked to contact DWM Jiron at (719) 539-8415.

Operation Game Thief (OGT) is a Wildlife Crime Stoppers Organization and is sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, which pays rewards up to $1,000 to citizens who turn in poachers. Callers can remain anonymous and never have to testify in court. Find more information on the program: LINK.

To report a possible poaching incident through OGT, call 1-(877) 265-6648 FREE.

Twenty-five years ago, right around this time of year, this old barn which stood south of Leadville on the old Hayden Ranch, collapsed. Word spread pretty quickly about the loss, and there’s probably a few of you out there that have a piece of the barn, as that old wood was picked apart like crows on road kill. In memory of that favorite landmark, Leadville Today wanted to post this great photo sent in by reader Helen Kohn which she took sometime in 1984/1985.

Twenty-five years ago, right around this time of year, this old barn which stood south of Leadville on the old Hayden Ranch, collapsed. Word spread pretty quickly about the loss, and there’s probably a few of you out there that have a piece of the barn, as that old wood was picked apart like crows on road kill. In memory of that favorite landmark, here’s a great photo sent in by reader Helen Kohn, took sometime in 1984/1985.

Spac_50Wildlife Officials Invest Moose Poaching in Leadville

Colorado Parks and Wildlife (CPD) officers are asking for the public’s help in providing any information on a possible moose poaching incident.

This cow moose was photographed along one of the Cloud City Wheelers Mountain Bike Trails located southwest of Leadville, near County Road 6 where the remains of a cow moose were found. Photo: Cloud City Wheelers Facebook Page.

This cow moose was photographed along one of the Cloud City Wheelers Mountain Bike Trails located southwest of Leadville, near County Road 6 where the remains of a cow moose were found. Photo: Cloud City Wheelers Facebook Page.

The call actually came in on Wednesday, Oct. 21 according to CPW District Wildlife Manager Joshua Jiron after two hikers found the remains of a cow moose along County Road 6. They called Operation Game Thief, a kind of  Crime Stoppers for Wildlife, which prompted Jiron’s investigation. The officer did find the moose’s hide along with the bones, however the rest of the carcass was not discovered.  In an interview with Leadville Today, Jiron stated that he did not have any evidence that the bull, calf or any other moose has met the same fate.

All throughout the fall local residents have been posting pictures of moose in the area, from families of four to the group of three – bull, cow and calf – that seemed to make regular appearances, especially along the mountain bike trails maintained by the Cloud City Wheelers.

This "Big Boy" Bull Moose was discovered along Old Chub Trail during the "Take a Kid Mountain Biking Day" on October 3 in Leadville. Photo: Eric Wanless

This “Big Boy” Bull Moose was discovered along Old Chub Trail during the “Take a Kid Mountain Biking Day” on October 3 in Leadville. Photo: Eric Wanless

“Riders reported seeing them all along the trails, there was a lot of moose activity in the area this fall, ” said Sterling Mudge with The Cloud City Wheelers, Leadville’s Mountain Bike Club which maintains a series of trails near County Road 6. Rider and animal interaction was reportedly positive and held at the recommended safe distance, with the only thing shot, being pictures.

On an encouraging note, Mudge did add that himself and other riders – as recently as Wednesday with the fresh snow – had reported seeing moose tracks in the area

There is no current moose hunting season underway in the game management unit. Poaching is a heinous crime that robs all of Colorado’s hunting, outdoors and wildlife enthusiasts from the state’s amazing natural resources.

If you have any information on this, or any moose poaching incident, you are asked to contact DWM Jiron at (719) 539-8415.

Operation Game Thief (OGT) is a Wildlife Crime Stoppers Organization and is sponsored by Colorado Parks and Wildlife, which pays rewards up to $1,000 to citizens who turn in poachers. Callers can remain anonymous and never have to testify in court. Find more information on the program: LINK.

To report a possible poaching incident through OGT, call 1-(877) 265-6648 FREE.

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