Latest News – November 8

Parent Summit For School District Monday At LCHS

On Monday, Nov. 9 the Lake County School District Parent Summit will be held at Lake County High School starting at 6:30 p.m. Please join the Lake County School Board to share your thoughts regarding the school district. LCHS_Logo_PantherThis is one of two bi-annual summits that the district scheduled after parents of students expressed a desire to have more regular, open meetings with the school board.

Last April , approximately 20 parents joined the Board of Education for the Parent Summit. Here’s a link to the overview from that meeting and what the next steps were to address concerns and meet goals: LINK.Spac_50

Coit, Shelton CMC’s Faculty of the Year

Educators Roger Coit and Danielle del Castillo Shelton have been named 2015 full-time and adjunct, respectively, Faculty of the Year for Colorado Mountain College’s (CMC) campus in Leadville and Chaffee County.

Danielle del Castillo Shelton, who teaches geography at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, was named 2015 adjunct Faculty of the Year for the Timberline Campus, which includes locations in Leadville and Chaffee County. This photo was taken on the college’s study abroad course in East Africa in 2013.

Danielle del Castillo Shelton, who teaches geography at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, was named 2015 adjunct Faculty of the Year for the Timberline Campus, which includes locations in Leadville and Chaffee County. This photo was taken on the college’s study abroad course in East Africa in 2013.

Coit, who teaches emergency medical services and outdoor education, was cited by co-workers and students in the award nomination. Past student Shawn Christiansen said that not only did Coit offer extra sessions for students who wanted them, he went out of his way to help Christiansen in getting VA benefits, and helped him find a job after he was certified. In collaboration with others Coit pursued a new program in snow science, and he has organized fundraising efforts for avalanche education signage as well as volunteered for local public safety training and events. 

Roger Coit, who teaches emergency medical services and outdoor education at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, was named 2015 full-time Faculty of the Year for the Timberline Campus, which includes locations in Leadville and Chaffee County.

Roger Coit, who teaches emergency medical services and outdoor education at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville, was named 2015 full-time Faculty of the Year for the Timberline Campus, which includes locations in Leadville and Chaffee County.

“He offers exceptional classes and maintains high standards and expectations for students,” said co-worker Cooper Mallozzi. 

Shelton was nominated by College Counselor Steven Medina, who said that the part-time geology faculty member “has proven time and time again to be accommodating to the needs and unique circumstances of individual students and to students collectively.”

He also said, “Danielle brings an orientation of inclusive excellence, drawing from her own multicultural background and education to enrich the classroom environment and students’ learning experiences.” 

Medina added, “Danielle lives and breathes servant leadership as an active contributor to the broader community she serves outside of CMC. Her stewardship of the Girls and Boys Club of Buena Vista is a prime example of Danielle’s influence in the community at large.” 

Each year, students, staff and faculty of Colorado Mountain College nominate one outstanding full-time and one adjunct faculty member from each of the college’s seven campuses and the online learning department. From those honorees, senior administrators then select a college wide award recipient in each of the two categories, representing the span of the college’s 12,000-square-mile service area.Spac_50

Composting Success for Students, Schools and C4

Last month, Lake County students at the Intermediate School (LCIS) and High School (LCHS) began composting their food scraps at lunch.  This organic matter, along with kitchen food scraps, is taken to the Lake County School District’s (LCSD) new Earth Tubs, which sit behind the LCIS. 

750 Lake County students are composting every day. Photo: C4

750 Lake County students are composting every day. Photo: C4

Wood chips are added, the tub is turned by hand in conjunction with a mechanical auger, and (voila!) in 60 days nutrient-rich compost is the result.  The Earth Tubs accepts all food from vegetables to pizza and each tub is capable of processing 100 pounds a day each.  Waste audits conducted by DOOR program high school students and Cloud City Conservation Center (C4) staff last year revealed the potential for food scrap composting.  According to the audits, over 80% of the school district’s waste is organic matter.  The school district plans to compost 20,000 pounds this school year.  

It’s not just the schools that throw away a lot of food, 30% of a typical household’s trash is made up of organics. 

“Lake County School District’s composting system is the first step to changing the way our community tackles food waste,” says Lynne Westerfield, C4’s Executive Director.  “We are going to show that not only is it possible to compost at 10,200 feet without smell or animal problems, but that kids can run the system.”  

The schools intend to use the compost to augment soil on school property and eventually to be used in school gardens and greenhouses. Photo: C4

The schools intend to use the compost to augment soil on school property and eventually to be used in school gardens and greenhouses. Photo: C4

LCHS’s Ecology Club, led by Michelle Cavanaugh, has taken the lead on monitoring temperature, moisture and nitrogen content as the compost cures in the tubs.  Cavanaugh reports that temperatures are rising in the Earth Tub due to the microbial activity of decomposition.  The compost pile in the Earth Tub was measured at 98 degrees Fahrenheit when last checked, well on its way to 120 degrees, when the hot and fast composting will really begin. 

Todd Coffin, Director of Facilities, Operations and Maintenance, intends to use the compost to augment soil on school property and eventually be used in school gardens and greenhouses.  Custodial staff, kitchen staff, transportation and maintenance staff play a big role in the project, from monitoring the compost at lunch to transporting compost to the Earth Tubs. 

“The kids are getting the hang of the system pretty quickly”, says Eva Mascarenas, Custodial Manager.  “We are happy to help with this project however we can.  It’s good for the kids and it’s very important to take care of our environment, here in Leadville.  I think composting and recycling programs will make a big difference in our community.”  

This project has been a partnership between C4 and the school district.  It is funded by the Freeport McMoRan Community Investment Fund, the Copper Environmental Foundation, the Summit Foundation and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s Environmental Education Program. 

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