Tag Archives: Leadville

Latest News – August 23

Hey Jeepers: Heads Up for Motorized Use Changes

This one’s for all you off-roaders, jeepers and ATV-lovers, there are some meetings starting TODAY concerning the US Forest Service’s travel management process, or simply put, to decide which roads are to remain open or not as a result of the MVUM lawsuit. 

Stay informed about changes in motorized use in Lake County.

Stay informed about motorized use in Lake County.

These meetings allow for folks to voice their concerns NOW, not once the changes begin to be implemented.  Tomorrow’s (August 24) meeting in Salida is as close as Lake County residents are going to get to express concerns in person, so please take note of time and dates listed below:

  • Tuesday, August 23, 2016: 5 – 7 p.m., Pueblo Community College,  Fortino Ballroom  900 West Orman  Avenue, Pueblo CO, 81004.
  • Wednesday, August 24, 2016: 5 – 7 p.m.,  Steam Plant Theatre and Event Center Ballroom, 220 West Sackett Street, Salida, CO  81201.
  • Thursday, August 25, 2016: 5 – 7  p.m., Colorado Springs Utilities, Pikes Peak Room, Leon Young Service Center, 1521 S. Hancock Expressway, Colorado Springs, CO 80903

Each meeting will include an opportunity for the public discuss the proposed action with Forest Service personnel and view maps of the proposed alternatives. The public is also encouraged to provide input regarding developing reasonable alternatives, resources to be evaluated, and other significant issues.  Comments will be accepted through close of business on September 8, 2016, and  submitted to:        

Write  comments  to:  Travel  Management,  Pike  &  San  Isabel  National  Forests,  2840  Kachina Dr., Pueblo, CO 81008; Email  comments  to:  comments@psitravelmanagement.org; or Fax comments to (719)  553-1440.

Forest Service Motor Use ChangesSome back ground: The current PSI Land and Resource Management Plan (Forest Plan) dates back to 1984. Many changes have occurred since that time, with new types of use, increased user volumes, general population pressures, wildland-urban interface developments, and other factors. The PSI issued revised MVUMs in 2009 reflecting updated routes open to the public for motorized use, but was subsequently challenged in court by various environmental groups contending that the Forest Service did not meet their agency obligations under the National Environmental Policy Act and other federal legislation. Parties to the lawsuit eventually reached a settlement agreement in 2015, which they believe is in the public interest and a fair and equitable resolution of the dispute.

As a result of the settlement agreement, the PSI is conducting travel management planning to designate roads, trails, and areas open to public motorized vehicle use on the six districts of the PSI National Forestswhich includes significant land within Lake County. Scoping for travel management began on July 25, 2016 with publication of a Notice of Intent (NOI) to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS). Scoping is a process used to identify important issues and determine the extent of analysis necessary for an informed decision on a proposed action. To read the FULL document release by the US Forest Service: LINK.

 

Latest News – August 22

It’s Back To School for Leadville Students

It's Back-To-School for these young L-E-M-O-N-A-D-E entreprenuers. Lake County School District gets back in session this week in Leadville.

It’s Back-To-School for these young L-E-M-O-N-A-D-E entreprenuers. The Lake County School District is back in session this week in Leadville.

Spac_50

Leadville Teacher, Students Honored at White House

If you know teacher Mona Cloys, then you know how important she is to Leadville students. So it is with great honor to report that this wonderful teacher was nationally recognized for developing a curriculum based on citizen science and environmental issues requiring students to investigate real data and, in-turn, build critical thinking skills.

Lake County High School teacher Mona Cloys received national recognition for her work with Leadville students.

Lake County High School teacher Mona Cloys received national recognition for her work with Leadville students.

This month, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the White House Council on Environmental Quality, recognized 18 teachers and 63 students from across the country for their outstanding contributions to environmental education and stewardship.  These 2015 winners and honorable mentions for the annual President’s Environmental Youth Award (PEYA) and 2015/2016 Presidential Innovation Award for Environmental Educators (PIAEE) were honored for their work at a ceremony today at the White House on August 16.

In addition to Cloys’ recognition, the Lake County School’s Styrofoam Stoppers team was also recognized for eliminating the use of polystyrene in their school cafeteria after learning about its negative environmental and health consequences. The team is made up of the following Leadville students: Nicole Caves, Hunter Dee, Violet Hill and Clara Kirr. The event which was held at The White House, included remarks from Gina McCarthy, EPA Administrator; Dr. John Holdren, President Obama’s Chief Senior Advisor; and John King, Secretary of Education.  

“These teacher and student winners are exemplary leaders, committed to strong environmental conservation and tackling problems including landfill waste and climate change head on,” said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. “Environmental education cultivates our next generation of leaders by teaching them how to apply skills in creativity and innovation. I have no doubt that teachers and students like these will someday solve some of our most complex and important issues.”Spac_50 Styrofoam stoppers

 

Latest News – August 21

Working on the Railroad: Improvements on the LCSR!

While the tracks of the Leadville Colorado and Southern Railroad that transport tourists through miles of alpine beauty haven’t changed much in their 28 years of operation, the popular Leadville attraction has made some noteworthy cosmetic and safety upgrades this summer. Plus there’s still lots of great fall foliage trips ahead. So here’s some train news!

This summer the Leadville train made upgrades to their French Gulch Water Tower stop, including an extnded vewing deck and safety railings. Signage and wildlife sculptures complete the new look. Photo: Leadville Today/ Danielle Orcutt

This summer the Leadville train made upgrades to their French Gulch Water Tower stop, including an extnded vewing deck and safety railings. Signage and wildlife sculptures complete the new look. Photo: Leadville Today/ Danielle Orcutt

For guests’ enjoyment, the scenic stop at the French Gulch Water Tower has undergone significant improvements. A popular photo stop, the old water tower provides a picturesque backdrop at the only disembarkment spot on the return portion of the 2 ½ hour train trip.

There is now an expanded viewing area with newly installed safety railings, giving those photo opportunities an extra special background for family trips. Closer to town, locals will notice the added signage at railroad crossings. The note basically give people a direct line of communication in case of any issues, as well as identifying licensing numbers for the RR. It’s safety first on the rails!

Closer to town, improvements included a parking lot spruce up, new safety signs at RR crossing and this new staircase to load up more passengers!

Closer to town, improvements included a parking lot spruce up, new safety signs at RR crossing and this new staircase to load up more passengers!

At the historic depot located on E. 7th Street, the north end parking lot has seen some upgrades, most notably the additional boarding staircase. No doubt the Leadville train’s popularity has increased bringing everyone from flatlander families, to high school reunions, to all groups in between, up to the high country for one of the most scenic rides on the rails. This summer the Leadville Colorado and Southern Railroad has seen record numbers as word spreads about this tourist train, particularly when it comes to staff!

On a whim, we drove up to Leadville to ride the Leadville Colorado & Southern RR,” posted LCSR guest David Long on the train’s Facebook Page. “And we LOVED it!! The staff both on the train and in the station were extremely friendly and helpful. Got a history lesson in Colorado railroads and the mining booms that brought them here. Best of all — for a small up charge, we got to ride with Pat the engineer in the locomotive for part of the trip. Quite an experience and something you just can’t experience anywhere else!”Spac_50

Three cheers for the Leadville Colorado and Southern Railroad staff who consistantly gets rave reviews from guests online for being friendly, helpful and knowledgeable. Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt

Three cheers for the Leadville Colorado and Southern Railroad staff who consistantly gets rave reviews from guests online for being friendly, helpful and knowledgeable. Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt

Spac_50And the season’s not over yet. If you’ve rode the train before and looking for something a bit different, then consider their evening Stork Curve-Climax Special BBQ ride coming up on Friday, September 2. It’s an evening of award-winning BBQ,and incredible alpine views await your evening ride up the Arkansas River Valley to the end of the track, near the Climax Molybdenum Mine. Tickets are still available at $57/adults and $30/children. Please call to make reservations as seating is limited and this tour usually sells out. 719-486-3936 or 866-386-3936.

Next Saturday, August 27, the whistle will blow for a special fundraising tour. Grapes GarinsThe Grapes and Grains on Rails Fundraiser for the Advocates of Lake County will be an evening ride and include some Elevation Beer, a sample of Colorado wines and appetizers. Tickets are still available at $40/adults and $30/children under 10 years and can be purchased by calling 719-486-3530. Proceeds benefit victims of domestic violence in Lake County.  This special ride is one of many local fundraisers that the train partners with and another great example of local philanthropy!

One of the Leadville Train‘s most popular package is the zip and ride package.  In the morning, your group will ride the train up high above the valley floor, letting you off at the Top of The Rockies Zipline crossing where you’ll be picked up and taken zip your way through the San Isabel National Forest down to base camp. This four hour tour is perfect for adults and children giving them an opportunity to see untouched wilderness and is available throughout the train season website. 

If taking pictures is more your thing then you don’t want to miss The Photo Special Train Rides which take advantage of Colorado’s autumn beauty!Spac_50

Sweeping view of the Headwaters of the Arkansas River Valley ablaze with autumn's beauty from the Leadville Train. Photo: Leadville Today.

Sweeping view of the Headwaters of the Arkansas River Valley ablaze with autumn’s beauty from the Leadville Train. Photo: Leadville Today.

Spac_50This tour goes all the way, an additional mile and a half, allowing you to see the full beauty of the Arkansas River Valley and will take 3 hours. Bring your camera and your jacket! And the best part? The cost is only the normal rate to ride the train! So grab your camera and other photography-loving friends and pick your date: Sept. 10, 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25 with two different departure times of 10 a.m. & 2 p.m.

The last day of the 2016 Train season is October 9. Until then it’s All Aboard! Leadville Colorado & Southern Railroad is located at 326 E. 7th Street in Leadville. Call 719-486-3936 or 866-386-3936; online at Leadville Train.

 

 

 

Latest News – August 20

Forest Service Erects Osprey Nest at Turquoise Lake

If you’re a regular fisherman or hiker out to Turquoise Lake there’s little doubt that you’ve noticed the 90 foot pole at the west end of the lake. Or maybe you’re a racer or crew in town for the Leadville Trail 100 “Race Across The Sky” run this weekend and are wondering what the new addition is at the May Queen Campground.  

This week, the US Forest Service erected an osprey nest platform out at Turquoise Lake. The hope is that the platform will encourage the birds to build a nest, breed, and increase fledging populations in the area. The 90 ft utility pole has been placed among lodgepole pines and the surrounding fir forest.

Operation “Osprey Nest” is complete thanks to a collective group effort including the US Forest Service, Leadville Girl Scout Troop (built the platform with their Dads), Colorado Chapter #2 Order of Eastern Star, Cutting Edge, Xcel Energy, and the hard working crew at the Lake County Public Works Department. Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt.

Operation “Osprey Nest” is complete thanks to a collective group effort including the US Forest Service, Leadville Girl Scout Troop (built the platform with their Dads), Colorado Chapter #2 Order of Eastern Star, Cutting Edge, Xcel Energy, and the hard working crew at the Lake County Public Works Department. Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt.

Many locals may remember the long standing osprey nest which could be seen from the Valley View Overlook Site at Turquoise Lake, above the north shore. Last year that nest blew over, creating quite a social media conversation, as the birds’ long-standing home was beloved by many Leadville residents – for generations – as the osprey would return year after year to their nest.

Osprey are beautiful and fascinating birds that play an important role in the area’s ecosystem. These birds are common sights soaring over shorelines, patrolling waterways, and standing on their huge stick nests, white heads gleaming.  Osprey happily build large stick-and-sod nests on telephone poles, or in this case an Excel energy utility pole. The nests are a bulky mass of sticks often five feet in diameter and two to seven feet thick, which could explain why the old one finally blew down from its weight!

The osprey nest platform was constructed by a Leadville Girl Scout group and their Dads. Good work, girls! Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt.

The osprey nest platform was constructed by a Leadville Girl Scout group and their Dads. Good work, girls! Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt.

While these large, rangy hawks do well around humans, but please enjoy these birds from a distance. Allowing them the space they need will ensure that they continue to thrive at Turquoise Lake.

As with many successful projects, the osprey nest erection was a group effort, including a Leadville Girl Scout Troop, which built the platform with their Dads. Other in-kind and financial contributions were made by the Colorado Chapter #2 Order of Eastern Star, Cutting Edge, Xcel Energy, and the hard working crew at the Lake County Public Works Department.

Friends of Lake County’s fine-feathered residents are pictured left to right are: Mabel Bogeart, Norm Schroeder, Jeni Windorski, Jake Farber, Brad Palmer and Michael Irwin. Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt.

Friends of Lake County’s fine-feathered residents are pictured left to right are: Mabel Bogeart, Norm Schroeder, Jeni Windorski, Jake Farber, Brad Palmer and Michael Irwin. Photo: Leadville Today/Danielle Orcutt.

Leadville Wildlife Biologist Jeni Windorski coordinated the efforts.

It’s one of several osprey nest projects under way locally.

To read about the efforts at Forebay Reservoir above Twin Lakes, connect HERE.

Latest News – August 19

“Race Across The Sky” Set for August 20-21 in Leadville

This Saturday and Sunday, August 20-21 nearly 750 competitors will race all day and into the night at the Blueprint for Athletes Leadville Trail 100 Run, produced by Life TimeSM – The Healthy Way of Life Company and presented by New Balance.Spac_50

Spac_50Competitors from around the world come to Leadville to prove themselves on the iconic 100-mile course covering grueling Colorado Rockies terrain where elevations range from 9,200 to 12,600 feet, with a total climb of more than 18,000 feet. 

“As we begin our 34th year, I continue to be in awe of all of the competitors here ready to defy the impossible and earn their place in Leadville Trail 100 history,” said Josh Colley, race director, Leadville Race Series. “The strength and grit each athlete portrays inspires all of us to lead an active, healthy life and push to make our dreams a reality.”

Top contenders for the pro race include 2015 and 2013 past champion Ian Sharman (United Kingdom) and 2014 second place finisher Mike Aish (United States) who is currently chasing the Leadman course record. For the women, ultra-running powerhouses, Britt Dick (United States) and Jen Benna are toeing the line.

Ian Sharman won the 2015 Race Across The Sky" LT100 Run with a time of 16:33:54. Photo: Leadville Race Series

Ian Sharman won the 2015 “Race Across The Sky” LT100 Run with a time of 16:33:54. Photo: Leadville Race Series

This year at the Leadville Trail 100, competitors from all 50 states and 36 countries are represented. Competitor Eric Pence is looking for his 22nd finish in the event, while an incredible 75 percent of participants, are competing in the Leadville Trail 100 Race for the first time. Javier Cendejas will be the oldest competitor at 73 and David Hedges is the youngest competitor at 18.

Over the course of the race, competitors climb more than 18,000 feet—which is like running up the Empire State Building 14.5 times (1,250 feet to the top). The first finishers are expected to complete the race in 16 to 17 hours and all participants have 30 hours to finish and earn the coveted Leadville 100 belt buckle. Most competitors will see the sun rise twice while they are running.

The entire pool of competitors will start the Leadville 100 Run at 4 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 20 and additional race timelines are as follows:

  • 8 to 9 p.m., Saturday, Aug. 20: Male top finishers expected finish time range.
  • 11:30 to 12:30 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 21: Female top finishers expected finish time range.
  • 5 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 21: 25-hour cutoff time. These runners are awarded the large silver and gold buckles.
  • 10 a.m., Sunday, Aug. 21: 30-hour cutoff time for all runners. These runners awarded silver finisher buckles.
  • Noon: Awards Ceremony at Lake County Middle School gymnasium, 1000 West 6th St.

For more information and complete results visit www.LeadvilleRaceSeries.com