Latest News – August 2

Fishing Favorable for Summer Fun on the Water

The lakes are full and the stream are flowing in and around Leadville and Lake County. Here’s Tim Hill with Colorado Fly Fishing Guides located in downtown Leadville, with the latest conditions for fishing – enjoy!

Upper Arkansas River (Between Leadville and Buena Vista)

FlyFishinFlows are favorable for the walk/wade fisherman on the upper river.  There is still quite a bit of caddis, sally and mayfly activity in Hayden Meadows and stoneflies are still kicking around from Granite to Buena Vista.  Fish are also starting to turn on hoppers throughout the corridor and hopper/dropper or attractor/dropper rigs are providing consistent action.  

There is some continuing restoration work being done on the Lake Fork of the Arkansas on Mon. – Fri. from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.  This is just above the State Trust and Reddy Easements and it greatly affects the clarity in these sections starting around 11a.m.  This also affects the clarity in Hayden Meadows above Kobe dropping the clarity here to fair.  Below Kobe, Union Creek cleans the river up quite a bit, but it still remains stained when they are working.  Anything below the Lake Creek confluence is not affected. 

This work is scheduled to go until at least the end of August and possibly through to the end of September.  Fishing these areas during the week should be done early in the day for the best conditions.
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Turquoise Lake Near Leadville Popular Recreation Area

Latest News – August 1

Happy Statehood: Colorado’s Red, White and Blue 

By Kathy Bedell © Leadville Today

HeadShotGraphicHappy Birthday Colorado! Yes, today our beloved state celebrates 139 years of statehood.

And when it comes to states, Colorado simply couldn’t be more patriotic. Its nickname is the Centennial State, because in the year of America’s 100th Birthday – 1876 – Colorado received its statehood. And of course, there’s the fact that “America The Beautiful” was written by Katherine Bates when she saw Pikes Peak and was inspired to write the verse, “Purple’s mountain’s majesty, above the fruited plain.”

But did you know that Colorado is the only state whose official geological symbols are red, white and blue?! Yes, when it comes to Colorado’s State Mineral (red- rhodochrosite), State Rock (white – Yule marble) and State Gem (blue- aquamarine) this color trio is an intended tribute to America. And – of course – this patriotic gesture has a Leadville connection!

Red

The color red is represented by Colorado’s Official State Mineral: Rhodochrosite. And it’s here that the local connection weaves into the red, white and blue story. The official bill to designate a state mineral was sponsored in 2002 by State Senator Ken Chlouber and Representative Carl Miller, both from Leadville.

Governor Bill Owens signs the Yule Marble State Rock designation into law in 2011 as the Girls Scouts look on. Photo: Colorado Geological Survey

Governor Bill Owens signs the Yule Marble State Rock designation into law in 2011 as the Girls Scouts look on. Photo: Colorado Geological Survey

The initial suggestion was presented by a high school Earth Science class, located near Bailey, who became aware that Colorado did not have a state mineral. After some debate, the students decided that rhodochrosite, because of its red color (similar to Colorado, which means “reddish” in Spanish) should be the state mineral. They wrote a letter to Rep. Miller suggesting the designation. And for a couple of country-loving Americans like Miller and Chlouber, working jointly to introduce this legislation was easy! Within three months rhodochrosite was designated the Colorado State Mineral and signed into law by Governor Bill Owens on April 17, 2002.

White

The white color in the geologically patriotic combination is represented by Yule Marble, Colorado’s State Rock. Again, it was a group of young people – Girl Scout Troop 357 – who prompted State Representative Betty Boyd to introduce the bill.  As the state known for the majestic Rocky Mountains, the scout group argued, it seemed odd that the state did not yet have an official state rock. Being surrounded by Yule Marble in the floors and trim of the State Capitol building, it wasn’t too much of a legislative reach to accept the designation. 

In addition, the Girl Scouts urged, designating the Yule Marble would complete the official geological symbols to be red, white and blue. Smart young women! Gov. Owens had the honor of completing the star-spangled trifecta when he signed the bill into law in August 2011.

Yule Marble has been used in many famous buildings and sculptures, including the Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument, and the Tomb of the Unknowns.Obit_Spacer_ThinRedWhiteBlue_CO copy

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Rounding out the American-themed symbols is the color blue, represented by Aquamarine designated as the state gemstone of Colorado back in 1971.

You’ll need to head a bit south of Lake County, towards the mountain peaks of Mount Antero and Mount White in Chaffee County, to capture the finest quality of these “blue” aquamarines. According to the Colorado Geological Survey website, they are also among the highest in elevation, located at 13,000 to 14,200 feet. The crystals in these cavities range in color from light blue to pale blue and deep aquamarine green, and in size from very small to 6 cm in length.

There you have it! So as you celebrate Colorado’s Statehood this August 1, sing out a little song of “Three Cheers for the Red (Rhodochrosite), White (Yule Marble), and Blue (Aquamarine)!” That’s how we’ll be celebrating it, In The ‘Ville.

 

Latest News – July 31

SOS Outreach from the Ski Trail to the Dusty Trail

By Brennan Ruegg, Leadville Today Contributor

The SOS Outreach organization has brought back their Leadville Summer program, making positive long-term effects on the bodies and minds of Leadville youth. The mentoring and adventure sport program has a band of young stewards on the rise, kids from 8 to 12, who took to the woods this past week to explore, hike, bike, day-camp, and rock climb, learning to serve nature and the community.

SOS Outreach mentor Max Keleman leads the kids in a community service project along the Timberline Lake Trail. Photo: Brennan Ruegg.

SOS Outreach mentor Max Keleman leads the kids in a community service project along the Timberline Lake Trail. Photo: Brennan Ruegg.

Last Tuesday, July 28, the kids tackled their SOS Outreach service project in the Mount of the Holy Cross Wilderness. Lead by Max Keleman, who has been working several years for the national non-profit, out of Summit County, and Ellen Terry, Americorps VISTA member, the kids set out on the Timberline Lake Trail.

The project involved slimming down the trail from a two-rutted 4WD road to a narrow, unassuming footpath. Photo: Brennan Ruegg

The project involved slimming down the trail from a two-rutted 4WD road to a narrow, unassuming footpath. Photo: Brennan Ruegg

As their community service task, they hauled fallen trees out of the woods and laid them down to slim the trail from a two-rutted 4WD road to a narrow, unassuming footpath. Steve Sunday, of the National Forest Service oversaw the project, teaching the children about the impact of their work, and the wildlife that would thank them if it could.

During their outdoors service, they also discovered animal habitats, weird things hanging from spider webs, and the remnants of old horse corrals. They learned about the snow-shoe hare, and his prey, the lynx, and how advantage and disadvantage works in the natural world.

During breaks, Max and Ellen got the kids talking about core values like compassion and humility. They laugh and hang like any group of friends on an outdoor trip.

Steve Sunday with the Forest Service guides the kids through the work along the trail. Photo: Brennan Ruegg

Steve Sunday with the Forest Service guides the kids through the work along the trail. Photo: Brennan Ruegg

SOS Outreach started 21 years ago. This is the third summer the national non-profit have brought their work to Leadville, where they have connected with Leadville schools and Full Circle of Lake County to recruit youth into their mentoring program. In the winter, they take kids out onto the slopes with ski instructors for several days. They instill the values and experiences that make a healthy, mindful, and proactive life possible. If you see those kids out there, thank them, and think about how good they look for the future.  

Leadville Today Contributor Brennan Ruegg has returned to the Arkansas Valley for the summer, where he is continually camping.

The Leadville kids got to enjoy a nice picnic lunch at Turquoise Lake when their work was done. Good Job! Photo: Brennan Ruegg

The Leadville kids got to enjoy a nice picnic lunch at Turquoise Lake when their work was done. Good Job! Photo: Brennan Ruegg

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Youth Programs Come Alive During Summer Months 

By Carrie Click, Contributor

On a recent summer day, Colorado Mountain College’s campus in Leadville was abuzz with activity, though most of the students at the campus weren’t yet old enough to attend college, at least in a traditional sense.

Alongside regular college fare such as faculty member Bob Gilgulin’s midday ethics class, dozens of pre-college youth were taking part in two of the college’s expanding programs for younger students. First Ascent and Upward Bound inspire high school students to consider attending college, though the programs achieve this in very different ways.

First Ascent builds leadership skills 

On the campus’s lawn, 35 high school students were discovering how difficult it can be to communicate clearly – especially when blindfolded and unable to speak.

A hail storm sent First Ascent students and counselors inside during one afternoon. At far right, counselor Kristen Nestor helps facilitate a trust game called Werewolf. Besides offering students challenging outdoor activities such as climbing and river running, First Ascent offers leadership and communication training. Photo Kate Lapides

A hail storm sent First Ascent students and counselors inside during one afternoon. At far right, counselor Kristen Nestor helps facilitate a trust game called Werewolf. Besides offering students challenging outdoor activities such as climbing and river running, First Ascent offers leadership and communication training. Photo Kate Lapides

“It’s about trust and communication,” said George Hunsinger, a lead counselor and former First Ascent participant from Silverthorne who is now attending Colorado School of Mines. Groups of three students were tasked with guiding one of their team members, whose eyes were covered with a bandana. A second student used hand signals to prompt a third, with his back to the blindfolded student, to tell the sightless student where to go.

The game was one of many leadership-skills activities in which First Ascent high schoolers took part. Designed to instill confidence and leadership skills in youth, ultimately leading to higher education, this is a free program thanks to a partnership with the El Pomar Foundation. Now in its 21st year, the experience is offered for one week each summer to high school students living in Colorado Mountain College’s service area. This summer students came from high schools in Garfield, Eagle and Summit counties.

All of the program’s counselors participated in First Ascent during high school. Now these counselors immerse First Ascent students in activities that address problem solving, consensus building, conflict resolution and communication. 

Besides participating in interactive outdoor games and attending workshops, the students climb nearby Mount Elbert, Colorado’s highest peak; raft the Arkansas River; and rock climb at Camp Hale north of Leadville.

“Rafting, hiking, climbing,” said Dominique Pino from Rifle High School, who had never attended a camp before First Ascent. “This is real life! It’s important for us to build a strong team.”

Wyatt Barnes, the program’s facilitator, anticipates that students will be inspired to continue their education like he did after participating in the program in 2002.

Upward Bound high school students Yarestsi Gonzalez and Jose Velasco worked with robots made from Legos during an engineering class at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville. The two were participating in the Upward Bound Summer Academy, a federally funded, six-week college preparatory program coordinated through Colorado Mountain College. Photo Kate Lapides

Upward Bound high school students Yarestsi Gonzalez and Jose Velasco worked with robots made from Legos during an engineering class at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville. The two were participating in the Upward Bound Summer Academy, a federally funded, six-week college preparatory program coordinated through Colorado Mountain College. Photo Kate Lapides

“This is the kind of stuff that impacts lives,” he said. “These kids all have the potential to go to college. Because of First Ascent, I went to college. We want to give experiences to these students so they’ll want to go to college, too.”

Participating in First Ascent has other residual perks, as well.

“Once the students attend First Ascent, they typically take on more leadership roles in their lives,” said Yesenia Arreola, Colorado Mountain College’s youth outreach coordinator. “We hear from parents that instantly, they see positive changes in their children.”

Upward Bound prepares students for college

 As CMC faculty member Gilgulin led a discussion about ethical theories to a group of college students, down the hall 16 high school students from Eagle and Lake counties also attended classes.

Each summer Colorado Mountain College offers, free of charge, six weeks of the Upward Bound Summer Academy, a federally funded college preparatory program. It is designed for students who are at academic risk, who are from low-income households, and/or whose parents didn’t complete a bachelor’s degree. Sometimes, all factors are at play.

Students live in the campus’s residence hall and take four classes each day: language arts, science, engineering and French.

“The purpose of the academy is to expose students to the college environment, expand their knowledge, and build study and time management habits,” said Acacia Fike-Nelson, the Upward Bound coordinator at Colorado Mountain College in Leadville.

German Aguirre is 15 and is going into the 10th grade in Leadville this fall.

“My brother was in Upward Bound and he told me about it,” Aguirre said. “He said he enjoyed taking classes, prepping for college. Now my brother is going to school at CU in Denver. I like the college feeling.”

Ozi Valdez is also 15 and from Leadville. He will be a sophomore this fall, and said he appreciates the time he’s spending at Upward Bound, since it’s helped him realize he’d like to study for a career in healthcare. This is his second year of participating in the program.

“Before Upward Bound, I didn’t think about going to college, but now I know I’m going,” Valdez said. “I think this program helps you know yourself and what you really want to do.”

Latest News – July 30

Let the Boom Days Countdown Begin – What’s New?

Even though Boom Days is rolling around a little later on the calendar than usual this summer, it’s now officially one week away, running from August 7 – 9, 2015.

Check out the new Leadville Boom Days T-shirts honoring the Mt. Champion Mill. Get yours at Peoples Bank Today!

Boom Days T-shirts!

 

It’s time to firm up your plans about what you’re going to take in, who’s coming up to visit and where is everyone going to sleep. What?! They’ll be no sleeping – it’s Boom Days!

While all the standard happenings are on the schedule, Leadville Today wanted to bring to your attention to a some new happenings for the 65th year of Leadville’s premiere tribute to its mining heritage!

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First “Reunion of Reunions” – Calling all Panthers!

In what hopes to become an annual gathering, the inaugural “Reunion of Reunions” will kick off over Boom Days weekend on August 7-9, 2015.  In a grass-roots efforts headed by Lake County School District alumni Kelly (Bain) Tiffany and Tabitha (Fairchild) Taylor and committee members Renee (Montgomery) Griggs and Lori (Costa) Sullivan from the Class of 1985,  all alumni of Lake County Schools are invited to several special reunion events on Boom Days weekend! Reunion_LCHS_Ad

According to organizers, the reunion is for anyone who has ever attended Lake County schools and is being organized entirely by co-chairs Tiffany and Taylor and a small committee.  

“We have come together not only to unite the Class of 1985 for their 30th reunion, but to invite all classes to come and share in the reunion spirit,” said organizer (Kelly Bain) Tiffany. Taylor and Tiffany coordinated with the school district to arrange a special tour of the newly renovated Lake County High School (LCHS). 

The inaugural “Reunion of Reunions” kicks off on Friday evening, August 7 with some adult festivities: a pub crawl beginning at the Pastime Saloon and ending at the Eagles Lodge.  Family activities for Friday evening include Family Fun at Leadville Aquatic Center 1000 W. 6th St. and helping decorate the “1st Annual Reunion” float for the Boom Days Parade on Saturday.

The historic Pastime Bar on old State (2nd) Street will be the start of the Reunion Pub Crawl on Friday, July 7!

The historic Pastime Bar on old State (2nd) Street will be the start of the Reunion Pub Crawl on Friday, July 7

  

Tours of LCHS and a dinner in the school cafeteria are planned for Saturday. Dinner is $35/person for adults over age 18.  Visit the “Reunion of Reunions” Facebook page to get the schedule and location for all events planned.

Tours of LCHS and a dinner in the school cafeteria are planned for Saturday. Dinner is $35/person for adults over age 18.  Visit the “Reunion of Reunions” Facebook page for a complete schedule and sign-up information. 

“Growing up in a small town, you usually knew kids three grades up and three grades down from you, plus little brothers and sisters of classmates, cousins, etc., so bringing all of the classes together each year at the same time is how one big happy Panther family can unite,” said Tiffany who has resided for over twenty years in the Chicago area.  

On Sunday, August 9 there will be a picnic at the Ice Palace Park behind the old junior high, now the National Mining Museum and Hall of Fame’s Convention Center.  All Panther family members are welcome to enjoy hot dogs, hamburgers and the fixings.  Prices are $10 Adults/$5 for children (14 and under).

The "Reunion of Reunions" will include a tour of the newly remodeled Lake County High School. Photo: Leadville Today

The “Reunion of Reunions” will include a tour of the newly remodeled Lake County High School.

“As the years go by, we hope the Alumni Committee can connect with more classmates for future reunions. I didn’t graduate high school in Leadville and neither did Renee or Lori, but we have strong family ties and we share “Panther Pride” and the love of this town with all of you who touched our lives when we lived here,” added Taylor. 

Pre-registration is a must and the deadline to sign up is fast approaching. There is an online sign-up invitation that includes details for all events: LINK

Any Lake County School attendee including teachers, are encouraged to send their email address to: reunionofreunions2015@gmail.com for sign-up and details.  Even if you cannot attend, sending your current email addresses is encouraged so that the planning committee can become more organized and aid the alumni database for future communications.

So as Leadville looks ahead to another Boom Days celebration, perhaps Taylor said it best: “Leadville tends to take hold of your heart and draws you back no matter how far you wander.  I now live in the Phoenix area, so coming home each year to connect with my Panther family is an amazing opportunity.  We all look forward to seeing everyone!”    

Note: The Lake County School District wishes to express their gratitude to these women for organizing what will surely be a memorable event for Leadville alumni! Go Panthers!Obit_Spacer_Thin

Lift Lift BOOM Competition! Are You Tough Enough?

This is the inaugural Annual Olympic Weightlifting Competition, sponsored by the Leadville Lifters, Lake County High School’s weightlifting club. lift-lift-boomThis competition is being promoted as an Olympic Weightlifting Open Competition to be held Boom Days weekend, on Saturday, August 8. Weight in starts at 8 am on the North Side of Lake County High School. The entry fee is $20 which includes a t-shirt.

Athletes will be competing at more than 10,000 feet above sea level. The meet is open to any and all USA Weightlifting members and clubs. Entries must be received by TOMORROW – Friday July 31, 2015. After you register please email your age, weight class, and starting weights to leadvillelifters@gmail.com.

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The famous Champion Mine is being honored on the 2015 Leadville Boom Days Belt Buckle. Photo: Boom Days

The famous Mount Champion Mill at 11,600 feet is being honored on the 2015 Leadville Boom Days Belt Buckle. Photo: Leadville Boom Days

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Have you been wondering what the Leadville Boom Days garter colors are for this year? Black and Gold!

Have you been wondering what the Leadville Boom Days garter colors are for this year? Black and Gold!

Latest News – July 29

“Friday Nights in Leadville” Continues This Weekend

The “Friday Nights in Leadville,” series continues this Friday, July 31 for the summer season with an Open Mic Music Night at the Legendary Pastime Bar, 120 West Second Street.

The last "Friday Nights in Leadville" Open Mic Night saw a host of Leadville music legends, like the one-and-only Hairy Gary. See who shows up this Friday at the Pastime.

The last “Friday Nights in Leadville” Open Mic Night saw a host of Leadville music legends, like the one-and-only Hairy Gary. See who shows up Friday at Pastime.

The evening will be hosted by George Finnell and the fun starts at begins at 7 p.m. Everyone is invited – to perform or enjoy. They had a good showing and jam session at last month’s Open Mic, so should be a worthy show!

The “Friday Nights in Leadville,” organizers are also having an active “Call for Performed Monologues.” Basically, it’s an invitation to actors and would-be actors to perform ten-minute monologues on Friday, August 21, at 7 p.m. at “Upstairs at the Brewpub,” located at 115 East Seventh Street. This new performance venue is a Labbe-family venture and will host several of the Friday Nights in Leadville throughout the summer.  Bring your own beverage. 

These “Friday Nights in Leadville” cultural events are free and part of the summer’s Friday night series sponsored by Zuni Canyon Institute. For information call 719-486-1282.Obit_Spacer_Thin

The Scarlet Provides Live Music Thru Summer SeasonScarlet_Music_1